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  • Author or Editor: L.J. Mason x
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Abstract

Dipping ‘McIntosh’ apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) at harvest in a solution of calcium chloride (4% w/w) and keltrol, a commercial food thickener, (0.3% w/w), slowed the loss of firmness in cold storage. In January, treated apples averaged 0.52 kg firmer and in February, 0.73 kg firmer than the controls. Ca concentration of treated apple flesh was 839 ppm, and of controls 304 ppm. A dip solution of calcium chloride without Keltrol was much less effective in reducing the loss of firmness and in increasing the Ca concn of the flesh.

Open Access

Abstract

Softening of ‘McIntosh’ apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) during storage was reduced by dipping fruit 2 days after harvest in 4% CaCl2 solution (40 g of commercial CaCl2 in 1 liter of water). The addition of Keltrol, a commercial food thickener, at 3 g/liter to retain more Ca solution on the fruit increased the effectiveness of the treatment. After 4 months storage at 0°C, fruit treated with CaCl2 and with CaCl2 plus Keltrol was 0.30 and 0.56 kg firmer by the pressure test than untreated fruit.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Normal fruits of ‘Anjou’ pear and fruits with cork spot (pit) symptoms collected at harvest time from trees of various ages, were peeled, cored, and halved and the calyx ends analyzed for mineral nutrient concentration. Pitted fruits were significantly lower in Ca concentration, but there were no differences in Mg, K, Zn, Fe, Mn or Cu. Pitted fruits had a mean of 219 ppm Ca (dry-weight basis) with a range from 187 to 255 ppm. Normal fruits had a mean of 319 ppm with a range of 244 to 453 ppm.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Spartan’ apples from 29 orchards were dipped in 4% calcium chloride Solution at harvest Senescent breakdown was reduced from an average of 8.3% in the undipped fruit to 2.7% in the dipped fruit Firmness was increased by 0.38 kg (0.84 lb.) and Ca concentration in the fruit flesh by 76 ppm by the dip.

Open Access

Abstract

Fruits of ‘Spartan’ apple were dipped in solutions of commercial CaCl2 after harvest to increase their Ca concentration. Fruits were stored until the following June, then the flesh was analyzed for Ca. Undipped fruit contained 203 ppm Ca and fruit dipped in 4% CaCl2 (wt/vol) contained 278 ppm Ca, dry weight basis. When surfactants were added to the CaCl2 solution, the Ca concentration in dipped fruit was 230 to 250 ppm. When thickeners and surfactants were added, the Ca concentration in dipped fruit was 373 to 825 ppm. These results indicate that surfactants reduce the uptake of Ca by fruit from dips but thickners with surfactants increase it

Open Access