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  • Author or Editor: L. J. Kushman x
  • HortScience x
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Abstract

After harvest, sweetpotato roots are usually cured for about a week at 85°F with high relative humidity before storage at 55° to 60°. If the curing period exceeds a week, or the storage temperature after curing cannot be kept as low as 60°, sprouts grow and often become excessively long. In most storages, sprout growth is difficult to control in the top part of storage rooms where heat and moisture tend to accumulate. Consequently, sprouts often must be removed by hand during preparation for marketing and this labor increases the cost of grading.

Open Access
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Abstract

Weight and volume losses of roots of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. cv. Centennial) during curing were reduced by increasing relative humidity (RH) from 80 to 90, 90 to 97, but not from 97 to 100%. Loss of skin increased loss of weight at all RH but significantly only at 80% RH. Loss of weight during storage was about the same for injured and non-injured roots unless weight loss during curing was high (above 6%), which resulted in a high loss during storage. Loss of weight during curing was highly and positively correlated with subsequent development of decay. During curing RH should be near saturation but during storage RH should not exceed 90%.

Open Access
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Abstract

Recent studies showed that at harvest sweetpotato storage roots contain as much as 10 milliliters of intercellular space per 100 milliliters of root; during storage intercellular space increases to the extent that it becomes visible and is classified as pithiness or internal breakdown (1). A preliminary report shows that by accounting for the intercellular space tissue specific gravity values can be computed and correlated with drymatter content in much the same manner as for Irish potatoes (2). At harvest intercellular space for each of four varieties was relatively constant for a given variety and differed significantly among varieties (4).

Open Access
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Abstract

Changes in pH and total acidity, comparable to those that occur in chilled roots during storage, take place in the field while the roots are still in the ground if wet, cold, soil conditions develop.

Open Access

Abstract

A technique is described for pulling a 1/8-inch wide strip of periderm (skin) from a sweetpotato root with an Instron Model TM. Peeling force values from 3.6 to 14.0 g were recorded. Root skin of ‘Earlyport’ and ‘Julian’ showed lower peeling forces than those of ‘Gem’ and ‘Centennial’. Failure force values were 2 to 4 times as great as peeling force values and did not differ significantly among cultivars. The data are related to known cultivar differences in skin characteristics.

Open Access