Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Kathleen M. Kelley x
  • HortScience x
Clear All Modify Search

The effect of kaolin (Surround™) on walnut quality parameters, including edible yield, reflected light index, insect damage, off grade, price per pound, and the incidence and severity of sunburn, were evaluated over a 4-year period in `Vina' and `Chandler' walnut orchards. Results indicate that applications of kaolin significantly improved edible yield, reflected light index, price per pound, and the incidence and severity of sunburn in most orchards in most years. Improvements in these parameters were more consistent with the `Vina' cultivar. Off-grade was not significantly reduced by the use of kaolin. Codling moth damage levels were too low to detect in all orchards in all years.

Free access

Two separate consumer-marketing studies were conducted between 30 Oct. and 2 Dec. 2002 to determine consumer awareness and potential demand for edamame [Glycine max (L.) Merrill]. The first study consisted of a sensory evaluation that included 113 participants who tasted and rated three edamame cultivars based on firmness and overall appeal and then ranked the beans in order of preference at The Pennsylvania State University, University Park Campus. To estimate demand, the participants answered questions regarding their likelihood to purchase edamame after the sensory evaluation. The second study, a telephone survey, was administered by a marketing firm to determine consumer awareness of edamame as well as their produce purchasing habits. Responses were collected from 401 consumers within the Metro-Philadelphia area. Consumer reaction to the sensory evaluation was positive, and after reading about the health benefits, a majority of consumers (92%) indicated they would likely purchase edamame and serve it in a meal whereas 89% gave this response after only sampling the edamame beans. When responses were compared among cultivars, overall liking for `Green Legend' (6.29; 1 = extremely dislike; 9 = like extremely) was significantly lower than for `Kenko' (6.84); however, neither cultivar was significantly different from `Early Hakucho' (6.62). Participants also rated `Kenko' as having a firmness that was `just about right'. Verbal comments from participants leaving the evaluation site included interest in purchasing edamame and inquiries as to where it could be purchased in the vicinity of the university. Telephone survey participants also expressed a willingness to purchase edamame and serve it in a meal after hearing about the potential health benefits (66%). Based on consumer responses to selected telephone survey questions, three distinct marketing segments were created. Potential purchasers (58% of participants), consisted of consumers who were more likely to consider the importance of the nutritional content of vegetables they purchased (73%), included the greatest percent of consumers who had purchased soy or soy-based products (70%), and were very likely (51%) and somewhat likely (46%) to eat edamame after learning about the health benefits. The second largest segment of participants characterized as unlikely edamame eaters (22% of participants) consisted of individuals who were very likely (20%) and somewhat likely (43%) to purchase vegetables they had never eaten before if evidence suggested that it might decrease the risk of cancer and/or other diseases. However, within this group, none of the participants were either very likely or somewhat likely to eat edamame after being told about the health benefits. The last group, characterized as requires convincing (20% of participants), consisted of individuals who were the least likely to base produce-purchasing decisions on the nutritional content of vegetables. After learning about health benefits specific to edamame, 8% of these participants were very likely and 48% were somewhat likely to eat edamame. Hence, separate marketing strategies may need to be developed to target these distinct segments based on interest in eating edamame, importance of nutritional information, and current vegetable purchasing habits.

Free access

A sensory evaluation was conducted on 9–10 Feb. 2005 at The Pennsylvania State University, University Park campus, to determine consumer acceptance of two edamame [Glycinemax (L.) Merrill] -based patties. This value-added product was chosen because of the increasing popularity of vegetable-based burgers. Patties were mainly composed of edamame, mushrooms, and onion; however, they differed, based on the type of mushroom and seasonings used and the addition of walnuts to one of the recipes. One type of patty was evaluated each day with participants rating it on overall appeal, flavor, appearance, and texture. A total of 209 consumers participated in the 2-day sensory evaluation, 106 on the first day and 103 on the second; and 23.6% and 25.2%, respectively, were familiar with or had heard of edamame before. Overall mean liking for the patties was 6.38 and 6.58 (1 being dislike extremely and 9 being like extremely) and mean liking for flavor was 6.44 and 6.83, respectively. Based on the sample, 43.4% and 35.9% of participants each day indicated that they “probably would buy” or “definitely would buy” this item from a supermarket. Consumers also ranked select product characteristics that influence their decision to purchase new food items in terms of importance. Results were similar for both days with flavor, nutritional value, and price ranked as the three most important factors that influence their purchasing deci-sions. Verbal comments from participants indicated a strong interest in purchasing this product. Results suggested that consumers found the two edamame-based patties acceptable. Small-acreage growers could consider marketing edamame for use in value-added products such as these.

Free access

The loss of container-grown nursery stock during winter months may be due to lack of root hardiness when exposed to cold temperatures. After Euonymus alatus `Compactus', Weigela florida `Java Red', and Hibiscus syriacus `Paeonyflora' reached midwinter hardiness, replicates of each cultivar were subjected to 12 hours of 21°C followed by 12 hours of 0°C each 24-hour period for up to 16 days. Controlled temperature freezing was conducted after each 48-hour period, with temperatures ranging from –6 to –27°C to determine the level of root hardiness. Plants were placed in a greenhouse environment to observe post-stress performance. Weigela was the most cold hardy, followed by Euonymus and Hibiscus. In general, the early accumulation of warming temperatures decreased root hardiness and delayed budbreak, with a noticeable loss of vigor. Results of this research will be presented.

Free access

A direct-mail survey was administered to gain perspective of the audio/visual tools Penn State Master Gardeners currently use to teach their clientele and their comfort level with using computers and accessing the Internet. Of the 700 surveys that were distributed to active MG during the month of November 2002, 386 completed surveys were returned. Male MG were more likely to use slides (44%) and less likely to use posters (15%) than female MG to teach consumer clientele (29% and 26%, respectively). Participants from single-adult households (20%) were more likely to use PowerPoint than those from households with two or more adults (11%). A greater percentage of participants, 54 years of age and younger reported having Internet access at their home (90%) and at work (42%) compared to MG age 55 years and older (75% and 16%, respectively). Over half of the younger MG (53%) responded that they were “very comfortable” with using the Internet to search for information compared to 37% of their counterparts. Currently MG use computers as a teaching tool on a limited basis, with younger MG possessing a greater degree of comfort with both the computer and Internet. By teaching MG how to use this technology the ability to reach a large audience can increase, thus further extending the reach of this component of Cooperative Extension. Though use of high tech methods to deliver information is continually gaining momentum, the number of MG who use less technical teaching tools should also be considered and appropriate tools should remain available.

Free access

A mail survey was conducted in 2000 to determine awareness and use of integrated pest management (IPM) practices by nurseries in Pennsylvania. Survey participants were randomly selected from the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, list of certified nurseries. Participants answered questions pertaining to awareness of common practices, frequency that IPM practices were employed, and specifics on monitoring and pest management decision-making processes. Responses were analyzed by Cluster Analysis (SPSS Inc., Chicago), which resulted in the formation of three distinct segments. The segments were labeled “IPM Savvy” (nursery managers who were more likely to employ IPM practices); “Part-time IPMers” (nursery managers who employed some IPM strategies and were interested in future adoption of IPM practices); and “Reluctant IPMers” (nursery managers who were least likely to employ IPM strategies). The “Part-time IPMers” and “Reluctant IPMers” segments represent a substantial part of the industry (51%), who continues to have concerns about the cost, efficacy, and implementation of IPM practices into their businesses. Overall, Pennsylvania growers are aware of IPM practices; however, maintaining permanent records of pests identified and pest management strategies employed remain low. Continued education is warranted to enhance pest monitoring skills and recordkeeping along with demonstrable evidence to the cost effectiveness and marketing benefits that the implementation of IPM practices offer the nursery operators.

Free access

Four-inch (10.2-cm) potted floweringCampanula carpatica Jacq. 'Blue Clips' (campanula) traditional herbaceous perennials, were sold in floral departments of three retail supermarket chain stores from 5 May through 20 May and 16 June through 1 July 2000. The intent was to determine whether repositioning campanula as a “new” indoor flowering potted plant would add to total floral department sales or detract from sales of more traditional flowering potted plants. Unit sales for all 4- and 4.5-inch (10.2- and 11.3-cm) flowering potted plants stocked in three supermarket floral departments were recorded weekly and compared with unit sales from three stores where campanula were not sold (control). Unit sales for campanula were similar to those of traditional indoor flowering potted plants frequently stocked in floral departments. Statistical analysis showed that mean unit sales of traditional potted flowering plants for stores that did and did not stock campanula were similar. Therefore, adding campanula to the flowering potted plant mix did not detract from or jeopardize sales of similar indoor flowering potted plants.

Free access

Three intercept surveys were conducted at the Penn State Southeast Research and Extension Center in Landisville, Pa., at three separate field days during the period of 28 July 2004 to 4 Aug. 2004 to determine grower (n = 78), retailer (n = 52), and consumer (n = 55) preference for annual planters. Survey participants were self-selected and asked to answer questions evaluating both their preference for and past experience with purchasing annual planters, as well as sociographic and demographic questions. Growers who were 45 years of age or younger were more likely to take price into consideration when creating an annual planter (68.8%) than those who were 46 years of age or older (43.3%), but less likely to use point-of-purchase material to educate consumers on proper container care (45.2% and 75.0%, respectively). Additionally, retailers whose business was 89% retail or less were less likely to consider price when creating annual planters (53.3%) than those participants whose business was 90% retail or greater (84.2%), and were also found to be less likely to use point-of-purchase material to educate consumers on proper container care (46.7% and 72.2%, respectively). Consumers were more likely to consider price when purchasing an annual planter if they were female (92.7%) than if they were male (66.7%). Consumer participants who resided in single-family homes were more likely to take the color combination into consideration when purchasing annual planters (100.0%) than those who live in another form of housing (e.g., apartment or mobile home; 66.7%). Additionally, consumers who live in single-adult households were less likely to consider color combination when purchasing an annual planter (88.9%) than those who live in households with two or more adults (100.0%).

Free access

An in-store marketing study was conducted in Fall 2004 to determine consumer demand for fresh, inshell edamame [Glycinemax (L.) Merrill]. Each Wednesday from 1 Sept. to 6 Oct. 2004, thirty 12-ounce plastic clamshells were placed in the produce department of four supermarkets in metro-Philadelphia, Pa. Packaged edamame remained in the supermarkets for 1 week and was replaced with fresh product when the next weekly delivery was made. A sample recipe, a follow-up survey and an addressed, postage-paid reply envelope were attached to the bottom of each clamshell. The survey was used to determine consumer perceptions, interest in Pennsylvania-grown edamame and the criteria they consider when choosing new produce items sold at supermarkets for themselves and their families. Of the 480 clamshells that were delivered, 312 were purchased. The total number of clamshells purchased weekly ranged from 64 to 87, while the number of clamshells purchased weekly at individual stores ranged from 6 to 30. Thirty-three surveys were returned with all participants responding that they had heard of or were familiar with edamame prior to purchasing the container. Of those who responded, 78.8% had purchased edamame before. Based on the total number of packages sold, a potential demand for fresh, inshell edamame exists among consumers in metro-Philadelphia. Results from this study will be used to assist small-acreage growers interested in marketing specialty vegetable crops, such as edamame, to chain supermarkets. By understanding consumer interests, we are able to more effectively determine which type of packaging and promotional materials best attract the attention of potential buyers.

Free access

Two studies were conducted to determine consumer interest in fresh, in-shell edamame [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] and acceptance of two edamame-based patties. An in-store consumer research study was conducted in metropolitan Philadelphia to determine consumer demand for and interest in fresh, in-shell edamame. In fall 2004, plastic clamshells of edamame were placed in the produce department of four supermarkets. Consumers who purchased the clamshells were asked to return a survey that was attached to the container. Of the 480 clamshells that were delivered to the four selected supermarkets, 312 (65.0%) were purchased and 33 (10.6%) of the surveys were returned. All respondents indicated that they had heard of or were familiar with edamame before purchasing the container, and 81.2% had previously purchased edamame. Results indicate that 51.6% of respondents were more likely to purchase the edamame because it was grown in Pennsylvania, and 84.4% were more likely to purchase it because it was grown without the use of pesticides. In addition, a friend's recommendation, price, and sample of the product at the supermarket were rated highest among factors likely to affect respondents' purchasing decisions regarding new produce items. Based on the total number of packages sold and conversations with produce department managers, there appears to be a demand for fresh, in-shell edamame among supermarket consumers in metropolitan Philadelphia. A second study involving a consumer sensory evaluation was conducted in Feb. 2005 to determine consumer acceptance of two edamame-based patties. A total of 209 adults were involved, with 106 participants sampling the edamame-based patties on the first day and 103 sampling on the second day. Participants were asked to rate the patty they sampled on overall appeal, appearance, and flavor on a scale of 1 to 9 points (1 point being “dislike extremely” and 9 points being “like extremely”). Overall mean liking for the two patties was 6.38 points and 6.58 points, and mean liking for flavor was 6.44 points and 6.83 points on days 1 and 2 respectively. Based on the sample evaluated, 43.4% and 35.9% of participants, each day, indicated that they “probably would buy” or “definitely would buy” this item from a supermarket. Results suggest that consumers found the two edamame-based patties acceptable, indicating the potential for commercial production. Across the two studies, consumers expressed interest in purchasing fresh, in-shell edamame and edamame-based patties from a supermarket.

Free access