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Trunk diameter, yield, root sprout production, and tree mortality of `Redglobe' peach were evaluated over a 14 year period on 5 rootstocks; `Lovell', `Halford', `Nemaguard', `Bailey', and `Siberian C'. Trunk diameter in year 14 was not different for trees on `Lovell' and `Halford', with diameters on 23.7 and 23.5 cm respectively, as compared to 93 and 45 kg on `Halford'. These were not significantly different from each other. Both `Lovell' and `Halford' produced 1.8 root sprouts per tree or less both years. Trunk diameter on `Nemaguard', `Bailey', and `Siberian C' was different from `Lovell' and `Halford'. Yields on `Nemaguard', `Bailey', and `Siberian C' were 92, 88, and 41 kg respectively, in year 12, with trees on `Siberian C' being different from the other 4 rootstocks. Yields in year 14 were 60 kg on `Nemaguard', 50 kg on `Bailey', and 28 kg on `Siberian C'. Root sprout averages per tree on `Nemaguard' were 1.6 and 6.7 in years 8 and 14 while `Bailey' averaged 1.1 and 7.7. Root sprouts on `Siberian C' were low in year 8, but increased in year 14 to 15.1 per tree. Tree mortality on `Siberian C' was 44% by year 14.

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Controlled crosses of a Vermillion red flesh color cultivar with 4 normal red flesh color cultivars were made. F1, F2, and backcross generations were grown in the field and the fruits evaluated for flesh color. All fruits of the F1 generation were Vermillion. The F2 generation segregated to a 9:7 ratio of vermillion to normal in all crosses. The probabilities of fit ranged from 0.10 to 0.95. This ratio is indicative of two dominant genes with complementary effects or double recessive epistasis, Backcrosses to the dominant parent produced almost all vermillion flesh fruit. Backcrosses to the recessive parents did not fit any documented ratios. Further analysis of the BC generations seems to suggest that flesh color is controlled by two dominant genes.

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Controlled crosses of a Vermillion red flesh color cultivar with 4 normal red flesh color cultivars were made. F1, F2, and backcross generations were grown in the field and the fruits evaluated for flesh color. All fruits of the F1 generation were Vermillion. The F2 generation segregated to a 9:7 ratio of vermillion to normal in all crosses. The probabilities of fit ranged from 0.10 to 0.95. This ratio is indicative of two dominant genes with complementary effects or double recessive epistasis, Backcrosses to the dominant parent produced almost all vermillion flesh fruit. Backcrosses to the recessive parents did not fit any documented ratios. Further analysis of the BC generations seems to suggest that flesh color is controlled by two dominant genes.

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Seed of 15 watermelon cultivars were evaluated for germinating ability at sub-optimum temperatures. Seeds of each cultivar were exposed to 12.8, 15.6, 18.3, 21.1, and 30.0°C for 8 days in a germinator in accordance to standard seed testing rules. Radical emergence was evaluated on day 5 and day 8. None of the cultivars germinated at 12.8C after 8 days exposure. At 15.6°C, 'Red-N-Sweet' and `Blackstone' had germinations of 54 and 40 percent respectively on day 5, and both increased to over 80 percent on day 8. At 18.3°C `Red-N-Sweet' and `Blackstone' exhibited at least 90 percent germination after 5 days while the other 14 cultivars ranged from 2.5 to 86 percent. At 21.1°C all cultivars except `Black Diamond' and `Allsweet' had germinations of 80 percent or higher on day 5. Germination increased to 90 percent or above by day 8 except for `Black Diamond' at 83 percent. There were no significant differences among cultivars at the 30°C optimum germinating temperature with cultivars having 89.5 percent or higher germination.

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Field tests at two locations examined the influence of length and spacing of root propagules on blackberry plant establishment. Root propagules 10.2 cm long spaced 61 cm resulted in greater emergence, plant stand, and shoot growth than 5 cm and 2.5 cm root propagules. Differences in emergence and shoot growth between 10.2 cm progagules spaced 61 cm and 5 cm propagules spaced 61 cm were non-significant. Greenhouse tests compared four lengths of root propagules (15.2 cm, 10.2 cm, 5cm, 2.5 cm) for production of nursery plants. Percent emergence, time of emergence, and number of shoots per propagule produced from 2.5 cm propagules were comparable to results from 15.2 cm and 10.2 cm propagules.

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