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  • Author or Editor: Jeanna Mueller x
  • HortScience x
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Glycinebetaine (GB) seed priming enhances stress tolerance in various plants during the germination and seedling growth stage; however, information regarding turfgrass is limited. In this study, GB at 5 to 50 mm was used to prime seeds of six turfgrass species to evaluate the potential of GB priming in enhancing tolerance to drought, salinity, and sub-optimal temperature during germination. Stress tolerance was determined as relative final germination percentage (FGP) and daily germination percentage (DGP), expressed as percentage of germination under stress conditions compared with the control treatment (i.e., unprimed seeds germinated under non-stress condition) for each species. Daily germination percentage was more sensitive to stress than FGP. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) showed high tolerance to drought, salinity, and chilling temperatures (5 and 10 °C below optimal germination temperature) followed by tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris L.), whereas kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon var. dactylon (L.) Pers.], and zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.) were stress-sensitive. Kentucky bluegrass and bermudagrass showed higher germination at 10 mm GB under temperature stress and drought and temperature stresses, respectively; however, other grasses showed limited responses to seed priming. Our results showed that the efficacy of GB priming is plant-, GB concentration-, and stressor-dependent.

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