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  • Author or Editor: Jean E. English x
  • HortScience x
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Abstract

The visual recognition of abnormal plant growth caused by faulty nutrition has been widely used in diagnosis and subsequent remedial action to restrict crop losses. Fortunately, symptoms of nutrient imbalance are usually quite characteristic and can be readily identified by the trained observer.

On occasion, however, visual symptoms may be masked or occur as a syndrome. In these cases it may be necessary to make major investigations into the chemical, and perhaps physical, characteristics of the soil. Unsuitable soil pH, excessive salinity, or severe nutrient imbalance are major causes of a complex of symptoms rather than those which are typical of a single element imbalance. Despite these exceptions, we believe that the visual method of diagnosis provides the most rapid means of identifying the commonly encountered nutritional problems.

General descriptions (8, 9, 11, 12) of nutrient disorders, keys (1, 10, 14, 17) and detailed descriptions for individual elements and crop plants (3, 4, 13, 16) are found in the literature. This key for nutritional disorders of vegetable crops was developed to provide detailed, yet concise, information on these crops. We believe that it will be useful as a teaching aid in vegetable crops and plant nutrition, and as a working key for diagnosis of field nutritional problems.

Open Access

Abstract

Seedlings of 5 strains of tomato (Lycopersicon spp.) were grown in low-Ca nutrient solutions in a greenhouse for 4 weeks in order to determine whether Ca-efficient and inefficient strains differed in concentrations of water-soluble Ca. Aqueous extracts from dried tissues of efficient strains were lower in percent of Ca and in electrical conductivity than were extracts from inefficient strains. Efficient strains may suffer less than inefficient strains from precipitation or displacement of Ca from functional sites in tissues by other ions.

Open Access