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  • Author or Editor: James D. McCreight x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Powdery mildew is a serious disease of melon (Cucumis melo L.) worldwide. Twenty-two melon cultigens have been used to define 22 reported races of the pathogen Podosphaera xanthii (sect. Sphaerotheca) xanthii (Castag.) U. Braun & N. Shish. Comb. nov. [syn. Sphaerotheca fuliginea (Schlecht. ex Fr.) Poll.]. Discrepancies in the reactions of eight cultigens to populations of P. xanthii races 1 and 2 in California, Japan, and Spain revealed genetic differences among them that can be used to differentiate P. xanthii race 1 and 2 populations in these countries. Implicit in these results is the existence of previously unknown virulence factors in these populations of P. xanthii races 1 and 2 that permit designation of new races of P. xanthii on melon. Synthesis of these results with previous reports resulted in the identification of 28 putative races of P. xanthii on melon that include eight variants of race 1 and six variants of race 2. Six of the cultigens exhibited resistant blisters in response to heavy infection by P. xanthii in field and greenhouse tests.

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Squash leaf curl (SLC) is a virus disease of squash transmitted by the sweetpotato whitefly [Bernisia tabaci (Germ.)]. 'Cucurbita maxima Duch. ex Lam., C. mixta Pang, and C. pepo L. cultivars and the wild taxon. C. texana Gray exhibited severe symptoms in response to SLC in greenhouse and field tests. Symptoms on C. moschata (Duch.) Duch. ex Poir. cultivars were much more severe in greenhouse tests than in field tests. Three wild species, C. ecuadorensis Cutler and Whitaker, C. lundelliana Bailey, and C. martinezii Bailey, were virtually immune in greenhouse tests, but were infected in field tests. Cucurbita foetidissima HBK expressed moderate symptoms in a field test. Benincasa hispida (Thunb.) Cogn., C. ficifolia Bouche, Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl., Luffa acutangula (L.) Roxb., Luffs aegyptiaca Mill., and Luffs graveolens Roxb. were resistant to SLC in greenhouse and field tests.

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Nineteen polymorphic and eleven monomorphic isozyme loci were identified in thirteen enzyme systems in a survey of four-hundred melon (Cucumis melo L.) accessions. Segregation of allozymes in F2 and backcross (BC) families for isozyme loci agreed with the expected 1:2:1 and 1:1 segregation ratios (P <0.01). Eleven isozyme loci were linked and were integrated to form a map containing two linkage groups spanning 98 cM with a mean linkage distance of ≈9 cM. Linkage groups (A and B) contain the following loci in the order: A Fdp-2, Pgd, Pgm, Mpi-1, Idh, and Ac, and B Pep-gl, Mdh-2, Mdh-4, Mdh-5, Mdh-6. The remaining eight loci (Acp-1, Acp-4, Ak-4, Fdp-1, Gpi, Mpi-2, Pep-la, and Pep-pap) segregated independently. The isozyme map constructed in this study provides genomic information for future linkage studies with economically important traits and concensus map construction through map merging.

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Abstract

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars and breeding lines differed in tolerance to lettuce infectious yellows virus. Correlations of symptom severity in field tests with fresh weight of control plants in a greenhouse test indicate a relationship between symptom severity and the inherent vigor of a cultivar. ‘Climax’ had the mildest symptoms and was the most vigorous cultivar. The level of tolerance exhibited by ‘Climax’ and a few other cultivars will not prevent occurrence of lettuce infectious yellows, but could ameliorate its effect on lettuce production.

Open Access

Genetic variation among 378 melon (Cucumis melo L.) germplasm accessions collected in India in 1992 and 26 accessions in China in 1994 was evaluated with 19 isozyme loci. `Top Mark' and `Green Flesh Honeydew', which represented two distinct C. melo ssp. melo L. groups, Cantalupensis and Inodorus, respectively, were used as reference cultivars. Genetic distances among accessions were calculated, and an initial cluster analysis using these distances resulted in 148 groups of varying size, ranging from two to 47 accessions. One accession from each of the 148 groups was chosen at random and used in a second cluster analysis that identified 11 accession groups. Group 1 was unique and consisted of only two C. melo ssp. agrestis (Naudin) Pangalo accessions. Two large branches were detected at cluster node 2. One branch was comprised of three groups of 3, 12, and 34 accessions, while the other branch contained seven groups of 2, 3, 14, 16, and 47 accessions, and the reference cultivars. Of the 148 accessions, 132 were from 41 sites in Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh, India, which were distributed unequally across the 11 groups. The 14 Chinese accessions originating from seven provinces were also dispersed unequally in the four major cluster groups. `Top Mark' and `Green Flesh Honeydew' were genetically distinct and uniquely clustered in the same group. These results indicate that additional collections of melon germplasm should be made in eastern and southern India.

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The spread of watermelon mosaic virus by the melon aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) was 31%, 74%, and 71% less to a melon aphid-resistant muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) breeding line than to the susceptible recurrent parent in a field cage study. Aphid-resistant and susceptible plants served equally well as the virus source. The highest rate of infection (97.9%) was noted when target plants were all melon-aphid susceptible, least (26.7%) when the target plants were all melon-aphid resistant, and intermediate (69.4%) when the target plants were an equal mix of aphid-resistant and susceptible plants. The number of viruliferous aphids per plant required to cause a 50% infection varied from five to 20 on susceptible controls and from 60 to possibly more than 400 on a range of melon aphid-resistant populations. An F family from a cross of the melon aphid-resistant AR Topmark (AR TM) with the susceptible `PMR 45' had significantly less resistance to virus transmission than AR TM. Breeding line AR 5 (an aphid-resistant population with `PMR 5' as the recurrent parent) had significantly greater resistance to transmission than other aphid-resistant populations.

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We report here the genetic characterization of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) based on polymorphisms of 50 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci in 114 accessions that included landraces, breeding lines, and commercial open-pollinated and F1 hybrid cultivars widely grown in Asia. Neighbor-joining tree analysis revealed a high level of genetic variability in the collection. The 114 accessions formed three subpopulations represented by five clusters. Distribution of accessions across the five clusters reflected their geographic origin to a large extent. South Asian accessions originating from India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan were more closely related to each other than to any other geographical group. Likewise, southeast Asian accessions that originated from Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, and Philippines were grouped together. Accessions that originated from Taiwan were genetically distinct and grouped separately. A landrace from Laos was genetically close to the accessions from Thailand and genetically distinct from the rest of the accessions. White-fruited genotypes were genetically distinct from green- and dark green–fruited genotypes. Low- and medium-bitter accessions were more similar to each other than to the high-bitter genotypes. Accessions with cylindrical fruit were genetically distinct from those with spindle or elongated fruit. Commercial cultivars in each cluster were closely related, which indicated a narrowing of the bitter gourd genetic base in Asia in response to market demands for uniformity and yield. Use of diverse germplasm resources in bitter gourd breeding will help in sustainable breeding and production.

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Abstract

Seven previously undescribed genes in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) for resistance to powdery mildew [Sphaerotheca fuliginea (Schlecht. ex Fr.) Poll., races 1 and 2] are reported. Progeny 92417 has a recessive gene for resistance to race 1, which is nonallelic to Pm-1. Breeding line WMR 29 has a gene for resistance to race 1 that is allelic to the recessive gene in 92417, but it is not known whether the two genes are identical alleles. Plant introduction 414723, 92417, and WMR 29 differentiated isolates of S. fuliginea race 2 at Montfavet, France, and Riverside, Calif. Comparative responses of F1, F2, and BC progenies from crosses involving 92417, PI 414723, and WMR 29 revealed six new genes for resistance to race 2. Genetic relationships among these seven genes are not fully known. Allelic and linkage relationships of these seven genes with the five previously known genes for powdery mildew resistance are also unknown.

Open Access