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  • Author or Editor: J.D. Norton x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Inheritance of resistance to Colletotrichum lagenarium (Pass.) Ell. & Halst. race 2 in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai) was determined in progeny from crosses between resistant plant introductions (PIs) 189225, 271778, and 326515 and susceptible cultivars ‘Charleston Gray’, ‘Jubilee’, ‘Crimson Sweet’ and AWB-10 advanced line. Parents and progenies were screened for resistance in field and greenhouse plantings. Resistance of F1 plants indicated resistance was dominant. The F2 plants segregated 3 resistant: 1 susceptible. The backcross of the F1 to the susceptible parent segregated 1:1. Resistance in all Pis tested was controlled by a single dominate gene pair.

Open Access

Abstract

Progeny from a hybridization of C. melo L. (PI 140471), a feral Cucumis melo, with the nematode-resistant African horned cucumber (C. metuliferus E. Mey.) (PI 292190) were screened for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita acrita Chitwood. Although C. metuliferus exhibited resistance, no resistance was observed in PI 140471 nor in the F2 generation after inoculation with a larval suspension having 600 larvae/ml. However, when grown in contact with chopped galled roots, certain progeny appeared to be resistant. Evaluation of egg mass production revealed that the resistant plants produced significantly fewer eggs than susceptible plants.

Open Access

Abstract

A high level of resistance to the cowpea strain of bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV-CS) in southern pea, Vigna sinensis, was found in P.I. 297562. Its mode of inheritance was determined in crosses with 3 susceptible cvs.: Knuckle Purple Hull, Mississippi Silver, Princess Anne, and an Alabama breeding line, Ala. 562.3-1-2.

Results of virus inoculation tests of F1, F2 and backcross populations showed that resistance in P.I. 297562 was governed by a single recessive gene pair. The high level of resistance of P.I. 297562 should prove valuable for breeding and development of resistant cultivars.

Open Access

Abstract

Watermelons Plant Introductions (PI) 189225, PI 271775, PI 271778, and PI 299379 were resistant to a population of Colletotrichum langenarium (Pass.) Ell. & Halst. in 3 states. Entries PI 203551, PI 270550, and PI 271779 were resistant in some field and greenhouse tests.

Open Access

Abstract

The inheritance of resistance to cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) in southern pea, Vigna sinensis (L.) Savi., Plant Introduction 255811, was determined in crosses with the susceptible cvs. Knuckle Purple Hull, Mississippi Silver, and Princess Anne. Segregation of F2 and backcross populations indicated that resistance to CCMV in P.I. 255811 is governed by 1 major recessive gene pair.

Open Access

Graft compatibility was investigated for 15 Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima Bl.) cultivars, nine American chestnut [C. dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.] selections, six Japanese chestnut (C. crenata Sieb.) cultivars, and two putative Japanese hybrids on two known rootstocks of Chinese chestnut. Intraspecific grafting of Chinese chestnut resulted in 80% success after two growing seasons. An unusual anatomical structure of the chestnut stem had a significant effect on graft success. The phloem fiber bundles related to graft failure are described in the study. Interspecific grafts of seven American and five Japanese chestnut selections resulted in ≥70% success. The putative Japanese hybrids had a significantly lower success rate (<50%) regardless of rootstocks. A marked graft incompatibility was found in one Japanese/Chinese and two American/Chinese combinations. Graft incompatibility related to morphological abnormalities at the graft union was also observed in interspecific grafts. Comparisons of cambial isoperoxidase isozymes between successful and unsuccessful grafts did not support the hypothesis that peroxidase isozymes are indicators of rootstock-scion compatibility. The results suggest that genetic incompatibility is not a major cause of graft failure in Chinese chestnut.

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