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  • Author or Editor: J.B. Jones x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Hawaii 7998 (foliage resistant to bacterial spot) was crossed with ‘Walter’ (susceptible) and F1, backcross, and F2 generations were derived. These genotypes were grown in the field at Bradenton, Fla. in the summers of 1984 and 1985 and inoculated with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, the incitant of bacterial spot. Disease severity for respective genotypes was similar both years, although somewhat greater in 1985. Disease severity in the F1 was intermediate to the parents, but slightly skewed toward resistance both years. The percentage of F2 plants with resistance comparable to Hawaii 7988 was 9.6% in 1984 and 4.6% in 1985. There was no evidence of cytoplasmic inheritance from three sets of reciprocal crosses tested in 1985. The data fit an additive-dominance genetic model, but dominance variance was negative both years, which indicates a small or negligible dominance effect. The negative dominance variance resulted in biased estimates of additive variance, narrow-sense heritability, and the number of effective factors. Nevertheless, narrow-sense heritability was moderate to high. When incorporating this resistance into new genetic backgrounds, we suggest that a modified backcrossing scheme with rigorous disease screening be used to obtain plants from homozygous resistant BCF3 lines before crossing.

Open Access

Abstract

Mouse ear is an abnormal condition in pecans [Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch] in which the leaflets of the compound leaf fail to elongate in a normal manner and develop into a “mouse ear” shape. Mouse-ear trees had more Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Mo and less Mg in leaf and stem tissues than normal trees. In both normal and mouse ear pecan, 92–96% of total Ca in leaves and stems was nonextractable in 2% acetic acid solution, being in the form of Ca-oxalate crystals. Crystals of cross-sectional area as large as 2000 μm2 and 6000 μm2 were found in leaves and stems, respectively. Although only 600 to 1200 ppm of Ca was available for physiological functions in leaf tissue other than for precipitation of oxalic acid. There was no significant evidence to show that mouse ear is a Ca-deficiency problem.

Open Access

Hawaii 7981 tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), resistant to race T3 of the bacterial spot pathogen [Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Doidge) Dye], was crossed to the susceptible tomato inbred, Fla. 7060, and subsequently F2 and backcross seed were obtained. These generations were planted in the field, inoculated with the race T3 pathogen and evaluated for disease severity over two summer seasons. Data were tested for goodness-of-fit to a model based on control by the incompletely dominant gene Xv3 that confers hypersensitivity. The F1 was intermediate in disease severity to the parents for both seasons. When data were combined over both seasons, the backcrosses fit the expected 1:1 ratios although each deviated from the expected ratio in one of the 2 years tested. The F2 did not fit the expected 1:2:1 ratio in either year or when data from the two years were combined due to a deficiency of resistant plants. Thirty-three F2 plants representing an array of disease severities and hypersensitivity reactions were selected in the second season and their F3 progeny were inoculated and evaluated for disease severity. Hawaii 7981 was significantly more resistant than the 12 most resistant F3 selections even though all expressed hypersensitivity. A hypersensitive F3 with intermediate field resistance was crossed to Hawaii 7981 and subsequently, F2 and backcross generations were obtained. These generations were field inoculated with the race T3 pathogen and evaluated for disease severity. Hawaii 7981 was significantly more resistant than the F3 parent as in the previous year. The data did not fit an additive-dominance model and epistatic interactions were significant. Thus, it appears that field resistance to race T3 of bacterial spot found in Hawaii 7981 is conferred quantitatively by Xv3 and other resistance genes. Breeding implications are discussed.

Free access

Crosses were made between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) inbreds susceptible to races T2 and T3 of bacterial spot (Xanthomonas vesicatoria and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, respectively) and accession PI 114490 with resistance to races T1, T2, and T3. Resistance to race T2 was analyzed using the parents, F1, and F2 generations from one of the crosses. The F1 was intermediate between the parents for disease severity suggesting additive gene action. The segregation of F2 progeny fit a two-locus model (χ2 = 0.96, P = 0.9-0.5) where four resistance alleles are required for a high resistance level, two or three resistance alleles provide intermediate resistance, and zero or one resistance allele results in susceptibility. The narrow sense heritability of resistance to T2 strains was estimated to be 0.37 ± 0.1 based on F2 to F3 parent-offspring regression. A second cross was developed into an inbred backcross (IBC) population to facilitate multilocation replicated testing with multiple races. Segregation for T2 resistance in the inbred backcross population also suggested control was by two loci, lending support to the two-locus model hypothesized based on the F2 segregation. To determine if the same loci conferred resistance to the other races, selections for race T2 resistance were made in the F2 and F3 generations and for race T3 resistance in the F2 through F4 generations. Six T3 selections (F5), 13 T2 selections (F4's that diverged from seven F2 selections), and control lines were then evaluated for disease severity to races T1, T2, and T3 over two seasons. Linear correlations were used to estimate the efficiency of selecting for resistance to multiple races based on a disease nursery inoculated with a single race. Race T1 and race T2 disease severities were correlated (r ≥ 0.80, P< 0.001) within and between years while neither was correlated to race T3 either year. These results suggest that selecting for race T2 resistance in progeny derived from crosses to PI 114490 would be an effective strategy to obtain resistance to both race T1 and T2 in the populations tested. In contrast, selection for race T3 or T2 will be less likely to result in lines with resistance to the other race. PI 114490 had less resistance to T3 than to T2 or T1. Independent segregation of T2 and T3 resistance from the IBC population derived from PI 114490 suggests that T3 resistance is not controlled by the same genes as T2 resistance, supporting the linear correlation data.

Free access

Abstract

Glasshouse microclimate during 3 growth periods in the Southern Piedmont region of the United States was characterized. An increase in density of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) by one-third, which doubled radiation interception, was suggested by early observations. Maintenance of clean glass surfaces was found to be particularly important during cloudy weather. There was no significant difference between mean air temperature and mean rooting media temperature in the raised beds used. CO2 concentration was found to be low (240 ppm) when fans were not circulating outside air. CO2 generators, installed to increase greenhouse CO2 levels, were not effective possibly because control was inadequate. The use of CO2 enrichment requires further study under Southeastern conditions. Relative humidity remained below the recommended 90% in the green-house except during cloudy-mild weather. Although inside relative humidity was generally less than outside relative humidity, values ranged from 90 to 100%.

Open Access

Abstract

Increases in the darkness and redness of both thawed and cooked highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), indicated by tristimulus measurements, were cultivar-related but not dependent on blueberry pH or anthocyanin content. Waxy bloom was retained in thawed berries but lost during cooking. Pigmented exudate appeared with some cultivars during thawing. Differences among cultivars in exudate formation and reddening during thawing are explained in terms of changes in epidermal cells, cuticle, and wax structure which were observed by light and electron microscopy. The color of blueberry cooking water depended primarily on the berry anthocyanin content, acidity, and the extent of leaching.

Open Access

Abstract

The effect of cultivar on cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) fruit size and composition was investigated. ‘Ben Lear’, ‘Crowley’, ‘Early Black’, and ‘Franklin’ berries contained about twice the anthocyanin of the other clones. Based on projections of analytical data, potential gain could be enhanced by increasing the proportion of berries that attain high anthocyanin content, seen in individual fruits within samples, as compared to the alternative strategies of breeding for improved anthocyanin content, for small berries, or for synchronous ripening.

Open Access

Abstract

A nutrient medium which enabled rapid formation of new spears and roots in shoot apices excised from buds as well as lateral branches of Asparagus officinalis L. spears was developed. This medium was composed of the following, in mg/1 : Murashige and Skoog’s inorganic salts; NAA, 0.3; kinetin, 0.1; thiamin·HC1, 1.0; pyridoxin·HCl, 5.0; nicotinic acid, 5.0; myo-inositol, 100; adenine sulfate·dihydrate, 40; sucrose, 25,000; Difco Bacto malt extract, 500; NaH2PO4·H2O, 170; and Difco Bacto agar, 6000. The shoot apices were cultured under 1000 lux Gro Lux or Plant Gro light and at constant 27°C. The explants were 0.15 mm in height and composed of the apical meristem plus a few visible subjacent primordial leaves. Within 6 weeks an avg of 80-90% of the cultures developed into miniature plants with several spears and roots. These plants, however, could not be transferred to soil with much success. The transfer necessitated further culture under another set of conditions, details of which are currently under investigation. The nutrient medium was inapplicable to shoot apex cultures of A. densiflora (Kunth) Jessop cv. Meyers, A. densiflora (Kunth) Jessop cv. Sprengeri, and, A. sarmentosus (Hort.).

Open Access

Baked ceramic aggregates (fritted clay, arcillite) have been used for plant research both on the ground and in microgravity. Optimal control of water and air within the root zone in any gravity environment depends on physical and hydraulic properties of the aggregate, which were evaluated for 0.25-1-mm and 1-2-mm particle size distributions. The maximum bulk densities obtained by any packing technique were 0.68 and 0.64 g·cm-3 for 0.25-1-mm and 1-2-mm particles, respectively. Wettable porosity obtained by infiltration with water was ≈65%, substantially lower than total porosity of ≈74%. Aggregate of both particle sizes exhibited a bimodal pore size distribution consisting of inter-aggregate macropores and intra-aggregate micropores, with the transition from macro- to microporosity beginning at volumetric water content of ≈36% to 39%. For inter-aggregate water contents that support optimal plant growth there is 45% change in water content that occurs over a relatively small matric suction range of 0-20 cm H2O for 0.25-1-mm and 0 to -10 cm H2O for 1-2-mm aggregate. Hysteresis is substantial between draining and wetting aggregate, which results in as much as a ≈10% to 20% difference in volumetric water content for a given matric potential. Hydraulic conductivity was approximately an order of magnitude higher for 1-2-mm than for 0.25-1-mm aggregate until significant drainage of the inter-aggregate pore space occurred. The large change in water content for a relatively small change in matric potential suggests that significant differences in water retention may be observed in microgravity as compared to earth.

Free access