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  • Author or Editor: J. Benton Storey x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Adjuvants at various concentrations were evaluated for phytotoxicity and capacity to enhance foliar absorption of N and P. Some adjuvants among the following classes were phytotoxic to soybean (Glycine max Merr.) leaves at concentrations of 0.25% and 0.5% active ingredient on a volume or weight/volume basis: sulfonates, alcohols, ethyoxylated hydrocarbons, esters, sulfates, and amines. Many adjuvants in the following classes: alcohols, sulfonates, ethoxylated hydrocarbons, polyethylene glycols, carbohydrates, proteins, and phosphates were not phytotoxic at concentrations as high as 1.0%. Sometimes increasing phytotoxicity occurred at increasing concentrations, but the humectants, such as glycerol and propylene glycol, were not phytotoxic at concentrations of 10.0%. Selected adjuvants were mixed with a foliar fertilizer (12.0N–1.7P–3.3K–0.5S) and evaluated for enhancement of foliar absorption of N and P. The average increases in percentage of N and P for the glycerol, lecithin, and Pluronic L-121 (an ethyoxylated hydrocarbon), and foliar fertilizer combinations, respectively, were 8.9%, 2.2%, and 2.5% for N and 34.2%, 27.6%, and 20.8% for P over the foliar fertilizer control, respectively, for the 3 adjuvants.

Open Access

Abstract

Tank mixing Uran (0.5% by weight) with ZnSO4 increased leaflet Zn concentration compared to ZnSO4 alone in pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch]. Zinc nitrate was more efficient than ZnSO4 in increasing leaflet Zn concentration especially if tank mixed with Uran (0.5%). Zn concentration of spray solutions can be reduced by 1/8 to ¼ of the current recommended rate of Zn at 86 g/100 liters of water as ZnSO4. Use of the lowest rate of Zn(NO3)2, 10.8 g/100 liters of water + Uran, increased yield and income over the recommended rate of ZnSO4.

Open Access

Annual variation in fruiting by pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] obtained from anecdotal records and state, district, county, and orchard data from Texas indicate exceptionally high synchronous fluctuations typically occurred every 34 years with a range of 2-7 years over the 66-year data base examined. Synchrony in fruit production was inversely related to the spatial distribution of pecans reflected in coefficients of variation ranging from about 60 at the state level to about 120 for two 10-ha orchards. These characteristics show that pecan exhibits roasting and that the species warrants further examination vis a vis interactions with nut feeders.

Free access