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  • Author or Editor: J. Ben-Jaacov x
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Abstract

Shoot segments of Grevillea rosmarinifolia A. Cunn. placed on solid half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 0.5 mg/liter 6-benzyiamino purine (BA) proliferated and formed shoots which were subcultured and rooted on paper bridges in Murashige and Skoog medium containing 0.1 mg/liter α-napthaleneacetic acid (NAA).

Open Access

Abstract

Pot plants of calamondin (Citrus madurensis Lour.) were dark-stored for 2 weeks at 10° or 20°C. There was considerable leaf and fruit abscission in plants stored at 20°. Plants stored in the dark for 2 weeks at 12° were of excellent quality and leaf and fruit drop was negligible during storage. These plants continued to flourish in a simulated home environment. Horizontal placement of plants during storage increased packing density by 50% without reducing plant quality, compared to plants packed in a vertical position.

Open Access

Abstract

Three clones of Ficus benjamina L. and one clone of Ficus retusa L. foliage pot plants were raised under 3 different light intensities. Variations in the morphological development of the clones in response to light intensity were recorded. Leaf abscission from these plants was followed at the end of 2 weeks of dark storage, and during a subsequent period of one month in a simulated home environment. In unstored plants, only low levels of leaf drop were observed. Leaf abscission was stimulated strongly during dark storage and in subsequent indoor environment. The degree of dark storage-promoted leaf abscission, and the response pattern to light intensity during the production phase, with regard to leaf drop during simulated home conditions, showed a clear clone-dependent specificity. It is concluded that the genetic background is a major factor affecting storability and subsequent performance under simulated home conditions.

Open Access

Abstract

The cultivation of a wide range of ornamental plants in a closed hydrosolaric greenhouse was studied. The hydrosolaric greenhouse was composed of a solar energy harvesting system and a hydroponic system. Energy collected by the greenhouse air from the sun during the day was conserved in the growth solution, which released it during the night. This system was able to maintain the air temperature 6 C above the outdoor temperature during the night. Relative humidity ranged between 85 and 100%, thus providing a favorable environment for tropical foliage plants. Philodendron bipinnatifidum Schott, Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, Ficus benjamina L., F. lyrata Warb., Anthurium andreanum Lind and Brassaia actinophylla Endl. produced under this system were of excellent quality.

Open Access

Abstract

Applications of fluoride and boron produced tipburn on Chlorophytum comosum Jacques ‘Vittatum’. Experiments were established to compare damage caused by F and B to Chlorophytum and to determine the influence of environmental factors and soil amendments on this damage. Damage incited by B was more severe than that incited by F and was unaffected by temperature. At 24°C and 15 µmol s-1m-2, increasing F did not produce tipburn, but at 31° maximum and 150 µmol s-1m-2, chlorophytum tips were damaged by increasing F. CaCO3 slightly decreased F damage but did not affect B damage.

Open Access

Abstract

Effects of Hydrosoil (ureafoam) amendment to a Florida sedge-peat, pine bark, cypress shaving medium (2:1:1 by volume) and watering frequencies were tested in a factorial experiment using Codiaeum variegatum pictum ‘Aucubifolium’ (croton). Hydrosoil-amended media held much more water by weight than media alone, but water retention by volume was increased only slightly. Hydrosoil had only slight effect when plants were watered twice weekly. The quality decreased when plants were watered once weekly and twice during 3 weeks. Hydrosoil did increase days to wilt of plants watered weekly or 2 times during 3 weeks.

Open Access

Abstract

Storage of Brassaia actinophylla Endl. (schefflera) for 30 days in the dark at 18°C temporarily reduced plant quality, but did not affect foliage color. Plants recovered from dark storage within 17 days after transfer to an environment with 15 μEm−2sec−1.

Open Access

Abstract

Dieffenbachia ‘Rudolph Roehrs’ plants were fertilized at 80, 160, and 240 mg/15-cm pot nitrogen and 80 and 240 mg/15-cm pot potassium every 2 weeks for 5 months, and placed in dark storage for 1, 2, and 3 weeks. Fertilization level did not affect development of leaf senescence or chlorosis during storage, but duration of storage did affect plant quality. Watering plants 24 hours prior to storing, or 10 days before storing, led to a difference in water usage by plants but did not affect storability. The main effect on quality reduction was duration of the dark period.

Open Access