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  • Author or Editor: Hong Lin x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and RAPD fragments are potentially useful methods for identifying turfgrass cultivar breeding lines. RAPD markers were studied in 25 vegetatively propagated buffalograss lines using oligonucleotide random primers and agarose-gel electrophoresis to determine their potential for identifying cultivar breeding lines. The variation of RAPD markers was extensive. The RAPD markers produced by one random primer were sufficient to separate the 25 buffalograss lines. Cluster analysis baaed on' the RAPD markers produced by two random primers revealed that the 25 buffalograss lines generally fell into two groups: diploid and hexaploid. Three DNA extraction methods—sarcosyl lysis-chloroform extraction-isopropanol precipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) lysine-isopropanol precipitation, and boiling in the presence of Chelex-100 resin—and fresh or oven-dried tissues were tested for reproducibility of RAPD markers. The three DNA extraction methods, using dry or fresh plant tissues, produced highly comparable RAPD marker profiles. More than 80%1 of the RAPD markers was consistently detected in six replicate analyses. The above studies demonstrate that small quantities (5 mg) of oven-dried leaf tissue and several DNA extraction methods can be used for buffalograss fingerprint studies.

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Volatile chemicals emitted from the flowers of chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinenesis) and japanese wisteria (W. floribunda) were collected using a dynamic headspace technique and identified using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry; 28 and 22 compounds were detected from chinese wisteria and japanese wisteria flowers, respectively. These chemicals can be classified into four major classes, including fatty acid derivatives, benzenoids/phenylpropanoids, terpenoids, and nitrogen-containing compounds. Two monoterpenes, (E)-β-ocimene and linalool, belonging to the class of terpenoids, were the most abundant compounds emitted from both species. Despite strong similarity, the floral volatile profiles of the two species displayed variations in both quality and quantity. Chinese wisteria was selected as a model for further study of volatile emission from different parts of flowers, emission dynamics, and regulation of floral scent production. Although floral volatiles were detected from all flower parts, petals emitted the most. The emission of floral volatiles displayed a diurnal pattern with the maximal emissions occurring during the daytime. This rhythmic pattern was determined to be light-dependent. Regulation of floral volatile emission by exogenous chemicals, including silver thiosulphate (an ethylene inhibitor), salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid, also was analyzed. Generally, jasmonic acid promoted the emission of floral volatiles. In contrast, neither silver thiosulphate nor salicylic acid showed a significant effect on floral volatile emission. The results presented in this article suggest that wisteria can serve as a useful system for exploring novel biochemistry of floral scent biosynthesis. They also build a foundation for the study of the biological/ecological significance of floral volatiles on the reproductive biology of wisteria species.

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