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  • Author or Editor: Harry E. Sommer x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

The acclimatization or hardening-off of in vitro-cultured sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) plantlets was studied using scanning electron microscopy. Comparisons were made among leaves of plantlets differentiated in culture, plantlets acclimatized after transfer from in vitro conditions, greenhouse seedlings, and mature trees. Leaves of plantlets directly from tissue culture had superficial, circular stomata and epidermal cells with irregular, sinuous undulations in the anticlinal walls. Leaves from acclimatized plantlets had ellipsoid, depressed stomata and irregularly shaped epidermal cells. Seedling and field-grown leaves had depressed, ellipsoid stomata and well-defined isodiametric epidermal cells. Stomata in all cases were confined to the abaxial surface, with densities significantly greater in leaves of in vitro plantlets than in acclimatized plantlets or greenhouse-grown plants. Epicuticular wax was generally smooth and absent of waxy outgrowths in all conditions.

Open Access

Abstract

The anatomy of in vitro- and in vivo-developed leaves of sweetgum, Liquidambar styraciflua L., grown under three quantum fluxes (PPF), was evaluated using light and scanning electron microscopy. Leaf characteristics of both in vitro- and in vivo-developed plants were modified by light: high irradiance was associated with more compact mesophyll and larger cells than low irradiance. However, when compared to plants grown in vivo under corresponding irradiance levels, all plants grown in vitro had smaller, thinner leaves and smaller mesophyll cells lacking extensive vacuolar components. Leaves developed in vitro had larger, raised stomata regardless of light level and, except at the highest irradiance, exhibited significantly greater stomatal densities than in vivo-developed leaves.

Open Access