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  • Author or Editor: Gary E. Vallad x
  • HortScience x
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Verticillium wilt of lettuce caused by Verticillium dahliae can cause severe economic damage to lettuce producers. The pathogen exists as two races (Races 1 and 2) in lettuce, and complete resistance to Race 1 is known. Resistance to Race 2 isolates has not been reported, and production of Race 1-resistant cultivars will likely increase the frequency of Race 2 strains. The objective of this research was to select lettuce accessions for resistance to Race 2 isolates of V. dahliae. Two independent populations totaling 314 randomly sampled PIs were evaluated for Verticillium wilt disease incidence (DI) caused by V. dahliae isolate VdLs17 in one unreplicated and two replicated greenhouse experiments. Selection for PIs with reduced DI was conducted between each experiment and plant stems were plated on semiselective media to identify colonized plants that remained non-symptomatic. No accession with complete resistance was identified, although accessions with partial resistance were selected. Genetic variation for the frequency of V. dahliae-colonized plants that remain symptomless was detected. Four PIs (169511, 171674, 204707, and 226641) were selected for further testing in three replicated greenhouse experiments and demonstrated significantly lower disease incidence than the susceptible control cultivars. The results indicate that lettuce has genetic variation for partial resistance to a Race 2 isolate of V. dahliae. The resistant PIs selected in this research are morphologically diverse, and no dependence between rate of bolting and resistance was found. PIs with partial resistance may be useful for breeding lettuce cultivars with resistance to Race 2 isolates of V. dahliae.

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Studies were conducted at three locations in Florida to evaluate the effects of kasugamycin alone, in alternation, or as a tank-mix partner with copper bactericides and other fungicides against bacterial spot of tomato. In greenhouse trials, kasugamycin, formulated as Kasumin® 2L, reduced bacterial spot severity by up to 37.5% compared with a non-treated control. Little advantage in disease control was observed by mixing kasugamycin with other fungicides. Kasugamycin was assessed in six field trials. In the four field trials that tested kasugamycin alone, it was as effective as the standard copper + mancozeb treatment for the control of bacterial spot. In four trials, no benefit was observed in applying kasugamycin as a mixture with copper + mancozeb, and only one of three trials did alternating kasugamycin with copper + mancozeb improve bacterial spot control over either the copper + mancozeb standard or kasugamycin alone. Although kasugamycin was effective for the control of bacterial spot in greenhouse and field trials, rapid development of resistance in field populations of X. perforans may shorten the effective use of this antibiotic.

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