Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Garvin Crabtree x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Five weed-control treatments (unweeded; hand-weeded; bensulide and naptalam; bensulide, naptalam, and paraquat; black polyethylene mulch) were combined factorially with three row-cover treatments (no cover, spun-bonded polyester, highly perforated polyethylene) in a 2-year experiment. Slicing cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.) were transplanted 26 (1985) or 23 (1986) days after application of the bensulide-naptalam. This combination of herbicides provided weed control for up to 4 weeks after transplanting, but was less effective in 1986 than in 1985. Row covers reduced herbicide efficacy. Spraying paraquat through the covers 2 to 3 days before setting transplants significantly improved weed control and cucumber yield. Soil crusting was reduced, and earliness and total yield were enhanced by mulch and row covers. Greatest yields and estimated net economic return in both years occurred with row covers with mulch followed by mulch alone in 1986 and by mulch alone or hand-weeding with row covers in 1985. Weed control, earliness, and yield were not affected significantly by type of row cover in either year. Chemical names used: O,O-bis(1-methylethyl)-S-[2-(phenylsulfonyl)amino]ethyl]phosphorodithioate (bensulide); 2-[(1-napthalenylamino)carbonyl]benzoic acid (naptalam); 1,1′-dimethyl-4,4′-bipyridinium salts (paraquat).

Open Access

Abstract

Close plant spacing in bush snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), sweet corn (Zea mays L.), and onions (Allium cepa L.) resulted in less weed competition, as measured by crop plant reproductive parts, than wider row spacings. Early weed competition was important in all crops but weed competition at any time reduced onion yields significantly. Corn required 2 weeks and bush snap beans 3 weeks of cultivation after emergence to eliminate losses due to weed competition. Fresh weights of weed at harvest time were significantly less (0.8 kg) in plots of bush snap beans at the narrow row spacing than in plots with the medium and wide spacings (2.8 and 2.4 kg) in an 0.81 m2 area.

Open Access