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  • Author or Editor: G.W. Lightner x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Branch growth of compact (CT) and “Pillar” (PI) peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.], a columnar growth type, and progeny of CT × PI was analyzed. PI trees were distinguished from CT trees by narrower branch angles and relatively fewer and longer branches. CT × PI hybridization produced two distinct classes of trees in a 1:1 ratio—globe shape (GL) and upright (UP). GL trees had a large number of branches, resembling CT trees, but had narrower branch angles. UP trees resembled PI trees, but with wider branch angles. Analysis of seedling growth at 1, 2, and 3 months indicated that height and number of lateral branches could be used to classify UP and GL mature tree form. Branch angle measured at 2 months was important in distinguishing GL from CT seedlings. Such measurements on young seedlings may be used for early selection of growth habit. The reported results indicate that peach tree form, in respect to branching density and branch angle, can be readily manipulated through hybridization of the appropriate growth types. The columnar form of the PI tree suggests its potential for high-density production systems and its use as a parent in developing narrow canopied trees.

Open Access

Abstract

In the article “Dry Matter Distribution and Responses to Pruning Within a Population of Standard, Semidwarf, Compact, and Dwarf Peach Seedlings”, by Ralph Scorza, Li Zailong, G.W. Lightner, and Lenard E. Gilreath (J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 111:541–545, July 1986), Table 2, under the “Variable” column, which reads “Avg length of shoots (cm)”, should read “Avg length of shoots (mm)”.

Open Access

Abstract

Ice formation was initiated between –0.6° and –2.6°C in mature Prunus persica (L.) Batsch trees growing in the field. Trees supercooled very little. Ice formation was initiated at several locations in the tree and subsequently spread throughout. The release of the latent heat of fusion following ice formation in the tissue maintained tissue temperatures 1° to 3° above air temperature for several hours and mitigated the tissue's response to ambient temperatures.

Open Access

Abstract

Sample sizes for detection of differences of flower bud survival in peach and nectarine [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] were chosen on the basis of theoretical confidence intervals (Cl) and least detectable differences (LDD) for the binomial distribution. Theoretical Cl and LDD for 1000-bud samples were comparable to Cl and Duncan's multiple range test separation computed from an analysis of variance for 1000 buds, based upon 10 replicates of 100 buds. Variability in survival was a function of eultivar, height of bud in canopy, and bud type. Variability may be minimized by sampling a given bud type (single, double, distal) at >1.5 m above ground level.

Open Access

Abstract

Three-year-old limbs of unpruned standard (ST), semidwarf (SD), compact (CT), and dwarf (DW) seedling peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] trees were separated into component parts at harvest. CT and DW trees had allocated higher percentages of dry matter to one- and 2-year-old branches than ST and SD trees. Although the proportion of dry weight in current season shoots was highest in CT trees compared with the other tree types, fruit dry weight was relatively low. In a separate study ST, SD, and CT trees were pruned and left unpruned, and current season shoot and fruit growth was recorded. Pruning increased the wood dry weight per trunk cross sectional area in current season growth in ST trees and increased the average length of shoots and lowered light penetration in ST and SD trees, but pruning did not affect current season shoot dry weight or length in CT trees. Shoot dry weight and shoot length were greatest in pruned ST trees. The number of shoots was not affected by pruning in any tree type. Total fruit dry weight did not differ with pruning or tree type.

Open Access