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  • Author or Editor: G. W. Varseveld x
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Abstract

‘Oregon 17’ is an early maturing bush green bean of ‘Blue Lake’ pod type. Its use may permit an earlier beginning of operations by Oregon processors. ‘Oregon 17’ is about two days earlier than ‘Oregon 1604’, a standard cultivar for commercial canners in western Oregon. ‘Oregon 17’ should yield less than ‘Oregon 1604.’ However, this deficiency may be offset by greater processing efficiency of ‘Oregon 17’ pods, which are smoother and straighter than those of ‘Oregon 1604’.

Open Access

‘Oregon 83’ is a bush green bean developed for commercial processing in western Oregon, where beans of the ‘Blue Lake’ type, either bush or pole, have been important for about 50 years. ‘Oregon 83’ is generally ‘Blue Lake’ in foliage and pod characteristics (Fig. 1). It may supplement or partially replace ‘Oregon 1604’, a high yielding cultivar from the Oregon State University breeding program. Compared to ‘Oregon 1604’, ‘Oregon 83’ is slightly later, has a shorter, straighter pod, and better growth habit. The medium-length, generally straighter pods should facilitate more efficient processing.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon 91’ is a bush green bean developed for commercial processing in western Oregon. It results from 22 years of breeding to develop bush bean cultivars with pod characteristics of ‘Blue Lake’ pole bean and an acceptable growth habit. ‘Oregon 91’ should complement or partially replace ‘Oregon 1604’, a bush green bean of ‘Blue Lake’ type which has been important to Oregon processors because of its earliness and dependable production. Compared to ‘Oregon 1604’, ‘Oregon 91’ is slightly later in maturity and slightly less productive, but has a better growth habit and straighter pods. It should be most useful to processors who need pods of smaller diameter than those of ‘Orergon 1604’.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon 43’, is a bush green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) of ‘Blue Lake’ type, developed for processing in western Oregon. ‘Oregon 43’ will usually equal or exceed the yield of ‘Oregon 1604’, a currently important cultivar, at smaller sieve sizes. It thus may give more favorable grades and higher return to the grower, but, pod wall fiber can develop by the sieve-6 stage of maturity, requiring careful management by processors. General quality of ‘Oregon 43’ has been acceptable for canning and freezing when it is harvested within a normal commercial maturity range. It may be of most value where a large percentage of sieve-4 pods are needed.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon Trail’ combines ‘Blue Lake’ flavor, color, and texture in a large pod borne on a bush plant. It differs from other bush green bean cultivars (1–5) recently released by Oregon State University in its longer pod and slightly less concentrated bearing habit. ‘Oregon Trail’ is recommended primarily for home gardens but may be useful also for processing or fresh market where large sieve pods are acceptable.

Open Access

Abstract

Lines Oregon 4, 5, 6, and 14 carrot CDaucus carota L.) were released for breeding or further selection, after the Oregon State University breeding program was terminated in 1978. These lines were developed at Corvallis with consistent exposure to wet autumn weather and are considered to have useful resistance to cracking and rotting under such conditions. They are primarily for processing use, and have shown good quality when canned or frozen, with deep orange to red-orange color and little occurrence of green core.

Open Access

Abstract

An accurate, rapid, and simple method of determining % moisture of cultivars of sweet corn (Zea mays L.) using a microwave oven is described. Working with corn in the moisture range of 65.5 to 72.4%, it was possible to obtain readings within ± 1% of those obtained with the standard 24-hour vacuum oven method.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Linn’ is a moderately vigorous and productive cultivar of strawberry (Fragaria ⨯ ananassa Duch.) with firm fruit for machine harvest or for a combination of machine and hand harvest. It was named for Linn County, Oregon, an area important in the early development of the strawberry industry in Oregon.

Open Access