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  • Author or Editor: F. D. Stroud x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Bearing trees of ‘Loring’, ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Babygold 5’ peach trees (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) on Siberian C seedlings defoliated earlier than those on the other seedling rootstocks. Early cold acclimation of scions in the fall and scion cold hardiness in mid-winter were enhanced more by Siberian C seedlings than by those of the other seedling rootstocks. Bud survival and fruit set of ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Bablygold 5’ scions were greater on Siberian C seedlings than on any of the other seedling rootstocks following an outdoor cold stress at -23.4°C in January. The cold hardiness of phloem, cambium, and xylem stem tissues were closely correlated with each other in the fall, but were not correlated with cold hardiness of flower buds on the same shoots. Seedlings of Siberian C appeared to enhance early scion dormancy and they increased scion bud hardiness by as much as 4.7° in the fall, and 1.3° in mid-February, compared with those of other rootstocks tested.

Open Access

Abstract

An 8-year study was made to assess the performance of Harrow Blood and Siberian C rootstock seedlings in comparison with the commercial seedling rootstocks Rutgers Red Leaf, Veteran, Halford and Bailey. Rootstocks significantly influenced tree size of ‘Loring’, ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Babygold 5’ peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch). Siberian C had the largest influence on size control, reducing tree volume by about 20%. Tree height and spread, trunk circumference and trunk cross-sectional areas were also influenced by rootstocks, but annual growth of terminal shoots was not. Rootstocks influenced crotch angle development of ‘Loring’, but had no effect on crotch angle development of ‘Redhaven’ or ‘Babygold 5’. Cropping efficiency of ‘Babygold 5’ was influenced by rootstocks but cropping efficiency of ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Loring’ were not. Yields were significantly influenced by rootstocks. The highest cumulative yields of ‘Loring’ were on Veteran seedlings, the highest of ‘Redhaven’ were on Rutgers Red Leaf and the highest of ‘Babygold 5’ were on Halford. Yields were also a function of tree size with the highest yields being obtained on the largest trees. Trunk circumference and crosssectional area were the only growth measurements that were significantly correlated with the yield of each cultivar. Tree survival was best on Harrow Blood and Siberian C and poorest on Rutgers Red Leaf and Veteran. Tree mortality was associated with winter injury and canker (Leucostoma spp.) infection but not with incompatibility.

Open Access