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  • Author or Editor: E. R. Emino x
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Abstract

In vitro propagation of Mammillaria elongata DC plants was successful using tubercle explants grown on a medium based on Murashige and Skoog’s high salts supplemented with various auxins and cytokinins. Optimum callus proliferation occured in response to 2,4-dichlor-ophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) (2-10 mg/liter) with either kinetin or 6-(dimethylallylamino)-purine (2iP) (1-2 mg/liter). Root initiation was optimized with either napthaleneacetic acid (NAA) or indolebutyric acid (IBA) (60 mg/liter). Shoot initiation was optimized by addition of 2iP (10 mg/liter) and indoleacetic acid (IAA) (1 mg/liter). The auxin:cytokinin balance required for shoot initiation appears to be unique for each species of Mammillaria studied. Shoots developed in vitro of M. elongata were successfully transferred to greenhouse conditions, where they rooted and continued to grow.

Open Access

Abstract

Bulk density, moisture holding capacity, pH, initial nutrient level, aeration or soluble salt characteristics were not consistently related to growth response in 6 commercial growing media. Growth of Tradescantia albiflora Kunth ‘Albovittata’, Hemigraphis alternata (Burm,f.) T. Anderson, Wedelia trilobata(L.) A. S. Hitchc, Peperomia obtusifolia (L.) Dietr., Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. ‘Better Boy’, and Hypoestes phyllostachya Bak. were highly variable among media.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Chrysanthemum plants (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. cv. Bright Golden Anne) were grown for 84 days in plastic pots containing 6 different media treated with inorganic fertilizers or liquid digested sewage sludge at 50, 100, and 200 ml/week. Plants grown in 1 soil: 1 sand: 1 peat, 1 soil: 1 sand, and 1 soil: 1 peat were similar to each other in size, and larger than plants grown in 1 sand:1 peat, all sand, or all peat. Peat-grown plants were smallest. Plant size and flower diameter decreased with increasing rates of sludge application. Plants fertilized with inorganic sources of fertilizer looked the same as those grown with 50 ml/week sludge (6 mm), except the sludge-treated plants were shorter and had a smaller dry weight. Plants treated with 50 ml/week sludge had flowers with a diameter and dry weight equal to those of flowers grown with liquid or pelletized inorganic fertilizer.

Open Access

Abstract

Nitrogen zinc nitrate solution was applied to 18 species of container-grown woody ornamentals to determine if Zn levels could be increased and related to increased growth and plant quality. In 13 species there was an increase in Zn concentration as compared to untreated plants. Quality was improved in 3 species without a related increase in Zn content. Fe and Mn concentrations were unaffected in most species and no phytotoxicity was observed.

Open Access