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  • Author or Editor: Donald H. Spalding x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

‘Irwin’, ‘Tommy Atkins’, and ‘Kent’ mangos (Mangifera indica L.) softened (ripened) with less decay at 21°C in air under normal pressure, and had a higher percentage of acceptable fruits, if they had been stored for 3 weeks at 13°, 98-100% relative humidity, and an atmospheric pressure of 76 or 152 mm Hg rather than at normal atmospheric pressure. ‘Keitt’ mangos softened similarly whether stored at low or normal pressure. Low pressure storage extended shelf life: mangos stored at 152 mm Hg required 3-5 days longer to soften after storage than similar fruits stored at 760 mm Hg. Softening times were similar for mangos of the same cultivar stored at 76 and 152 mm Hg.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Tahiti’ (‘Persian’) limes (Citrus latifolia Tanaka) retained green color, juice content, and flavor acceptable for marketing and had a low incidence of decay during storage at a low atmospheric pressure of 170 mm Hg for up to 6 weeks at 10.0°C or 15.6° and a relative humidity (RH) of 98—100%. Check fruits turned yellow within 3 weeks at normal atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg). Limes stored for 4 weeks at 170 mm Hg at 2.2°C and 98—100% RH developed as much chilling injury as comparable limes stored at normal atmospheric pressure. Limes coated with wax containing 0.1% of either thiabendazole or benomyl remained green and suitable for marketing after 3—4 weeks at 170 mm Hg at 21.1°C.

Open Access

Abstract

Tobelle’ sweet corn (Zea mays var. saccharata (Sturtev.) Bailey) stored for 3 weeks at 1.7°C and 98100% relative humidity in controlled atmospheres (2 or 21% 02 with 0, 15, or 25% CO2) or at low atmospheric pressure (50 mm Hg) did not differ significantly in appearance or flavor. Sucrose content of stored corn remained higher in 2% O2 at normal or low atmospheric pressure (76 mm Hg) than in other atmospheres. Ethanol content increased during storage, except in 21% O2 without added CO2, and was highest in corn stored in atmospheres containing 25% CO2. The high sucrose content of ‘Florida Sweet’ even after 3-weeks-storage suggests that for maintenance of high market quality, breeding cultivars that retain quality in combination with prompt precooling offers more chance of success than modified atmospheres.

Open Access