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  • Author or Editor: D. R. Paterson x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Exposure of potato tubers to an atmosphere of 80% CO2-20% O2 increased sprout growth and yield. There was a significant interaction between CO2 treatment and cultivar. Treated potato tuber halves absorbed CO2 and had a higher respiratory rate than control pieces of the same tuber. Treated tissues demonstrated a greater rate of nonosmotic water uptake than similar nontreated tissue. Exposure of the root system of ‘Red LaSoda’ plants to 80% CO2 20% O2 atmosphere for 12 hours resulted in the formation of significantly more tubers than on checks. Treated plants showed either increased tuberization along the length of the stolons or vegetative tuber stolons and branching of the stolons. High levels of CO2 in the internal atmosphere of potato tubers were accompanied by physiologically active levels of ethylene (C2H4).

Open Access
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Abstract

The internal atmosphere extracted from the basal 6 inches of sweet potato plants held for one minute at 48°C in tap water was higher in ethylene (C2H4) and oxygen (O2) and lower in carbon dioxide (CO2) than similar samples from untreated plant material. This increase in endogenous C2H4 content of treated sweet potato slips was accompanied by increases in respiration rate, early growth and total root yield at harvest. C2H4 content, respiration rate, early growth and yield appeared to be essentially quadratic functions of treatment time at 48°C. Maximum values for the above parameters occurred after treatment for 1 to 2 minutes at 48°C.

Open Access

Abstract

Studies were conducted to determine the effects of mulch treatment and soil moisture on plant production, soil temperature and the metabolism of sweetpotato roots. The use of petroleum agricultural mulch resulted in the harvest of sweetpotato slips 2 weeks before any of the other mulch treatments produced usable plants. A single layer or clear plastic, roofing felt, and also black plastic increased the earliness of sweetpotato plant production. The use of a single and a double layer of clear or clear over black plastic resulted in lower slip production and injury to the bedded roots. At a depth of 3 inches all the mulch treatments increased average soil temperatures when compared to the unmulched treatment. A double layer of clear plastic gave the highest average soil temperature at the 3 inch depth. There was little difference in average soil temperature 3 inches under the clear over black plastic, clear plastic, or petroleum mulch treatments.

Sweetpotatoes growing in soil and in soil covered with a layer of petroleum mulch (ENCAP) or hexadecanol (TAGE) had a higher respiration rate than roots growing in air at 30°C. ENCAP and TAGE increased the CO2 emission of sweetpotato roots in comparison to non-mulched controls. Roots growing in soil and in soil mulched with ENCAP had more top and root growth than roots growing in air. TAGE restricted top and root growth of sweetpotato roots growing in soil. Soil moisture increased the respiration rate of sweetpotato roots more than ENCAP at 30°.

Open Access

Abstract

Bench chip budding was tested as an alternative to T-budding of roses in field bush production. Greater than 90% success was obtained when ‘Mirandy’ scions (Rosa hybrida L.) were bench chip budded to rooted ‘Brooks 56’ R. multiflora Thunb. rootstocks with a Liliput budding tool. Growth of chip budded scions was inhibited by the presence of rootstock lateral shoots. This correlative inhibition was overcome by selected forcing, girdling, and pruning treatments to promote vigorous scion growth. Best chip bud growth was obtained when scions were budded onto the same side as rootstock lateral shoots and rootstock stems were partially cut or girdled. A positive correlation existed between ‘Mirandy’ scion shoot growth and flowering.

Open Access