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  • Author or Editor: Charles E. Johnson x
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Influence on productivity of `Harvester' peach trees to three methods of preplant soil preparation were studied for five years. The three methods were as follows: 1) a backhoe was used to prepare the soil, 2) a turn-plow, and 3) no preparation. Trunk yield data were taken after the first three growing seasons. There were no significant treatment differences for yield at the .05 level of probability. Trends show an increase in yield using the turn-plow and the backhoe method showed better early tree growth, but by the fifth year, there were no apparent differences.

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Inheritance of dark green stripe and light green rind color in watermelon was investigated. Controlled crosses were made between watermelon cultivars: `Louisiana Sweet'-light green rind with dark green stripe; `Calhoun Sweet'-dark green rind without stripes; and `Charleston Gray' and `Calhoun Gray' both having light green rind without stripes. Plants of parental, F1, F2, and BC lines were classified as to rind color and presence or absence of stripe. All F1 progenies produced only striped fruit. Chi Square analysis of F2 and BC generations corresponded to 3:1 and 1:1 ratios respectively, for stripe:no stripe, indicating dark green stripe was controlled by one dominant gene. The cross `Louisiana Sweet' × `Calhoun Sweet',(light green × dark green rind color), resulted in F1 and F2 progeny having only dark green rind fruit, indicating obvious dominance for dark green rind color. Segregation in BC populations indicated a single dominant gene for dark green rind color; however, lack of segregation in the F2 suggests additional factors may be involved.

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Growth in juice-based products is supported by an increasing consumer base, which perceives fruit and fruit-based beverages as an integral component of nutritious food types that can benefit health. New flavor combinations, as well as added ingredients (i.e., vitamins) continue to help boost juice appeal as a nutraceutical. New juice-based food products such as blends, jellies, marinades, and pastry fillings could benefit from the unique flavor attributes specific to mayhaw fruit juice. Juice from one cultivar of muscadine grape (Vitisrotundifolia Michx.) `Carlos' (bronze skinned) was mixed with varying levels of juice from one cultivar of mayhaw (Crataegusopaca) `Texas Star' (reddish-orange skinned) fruit. Five different blend combinations were tested for both individual juice quality and for juice-blend compatibility. A consumer preference test was conducted (n = 75) on a 9-point hedonic scale for color, taste, and overall liking. Next to the taste/flavor preference scores for control (6.8), mayhaw juice used as the primary flavor ingredient in blends was the second most preferred of all juices by the panelists. A 50/50 juice blend and 70/30 mayhaw/muscadine blend were the least desirable of the five combinations tested. Juices from 60/40, 30/70, and 40/60 mayhaw/muscadine were considered by the panelists as best in flavor and overall acceptability. “Taste” had the strongest effect on overall acceptability of juice from varying levels of mayhaw juice in combination with muscadine grape juice. Panelists' mean score averages collectively were favorable of 60:40 and 50:50 juice blends and were significant (P < 0.05) toward acceptance of a “mayhaw-muscadine” fruit juice blended drink.

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