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  • Author or Editor: Arthur Villordon x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Genetic uniformity was assessed among sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) clones propagated through adventitious and nodal procedures. A single sprout each of `Jewel,' `Sumor,' and L87-95 was used as source of clonal plants that were simultaneously propagated through conventional adventitious procedures and a tissue culture-based nodal culture technique. A sample of 15 decamer primers generated 64 scorable amplified fragments in a PCR-based assay, 29 of which were putatively polymorphic across n = 60 samples (10 each of nodal and adventitiously derived plants/genotype). Within adventitiously derived materials, putative polymorphisms ranged from 4.7% to 31.3% depending on the genotypic class. In contrast, putative polymorphisms ranged from 0.0% to 3.1% among nodally derived samples. Marker loci differentiated genotypes as well as putative marker phenotype variants through a multidimensional scaling analysis of the genetic similarity matrix. An `analysis of molecular variance' shows that genotypic effects accounted for 88.7% of the total molecular marker variability, while propagation effects (within genotypic groups) accounted for 11.3%. Results confirm that clonal plants derived from preexisting meristematic regions are more genetically uniform than plants propagated from adventitious origins.

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Polymorphism analysis and yield tests were conducted among `Jewel' sweetpotato clones [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] obtained from eight state foundation seed programs. Initially, 38 arbitrary primers generated a total of 110 scorable DNA fragments in a sample of virus-indexed plants from each clone source. The number of marker loci scored for each primer varied from one to eight with an average of 2.89. Twenty-one bands (19.1%) were scored as putative polymorphic markers based on the presence or absence of amplified products. Further estimation of variability within each clone source was accomplished by an assay of 10 sample plants per clone group by 14 marker loci generated by four selected primers. Polymorphic bands ranged from 7.1% to 35.7 % in five of eight clone groups. Field studies show variation in nearly all yield grades measured. In three tests during the 1991 and 1992 seasons, yield differences ranged from 27% to 46% within the economically important U.S. no. 1 root grade. The results suggest the usefulness of arbitrarily-primed markers in detecting intra-clonal sweetpotato DNA polymorphisms and indicate an underlying genetic cause for phenotypic variability in the crop.

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Greenhouse and field culture systems were used to study the effect of drought conditions on the storage root (SR) formation in ‘Beauregard’ sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). In the greenhouse culture system, drought was simulated by withholding water for 5 and 10 days after transplanting (DAT) cuttings in dry sand. Control plants received water at planting and every 3 days thereafter. In the field studies, natural drought conditions and selective irrigation were used to impose water deprivation during the critical SR formation period. Greenhouse drought for 5 and 10 DAT reduced the number of SRs by 42% and 66%, respectively, compared with the controls. Field drought resulted in a 49% reduction in U.S. #1 SR yield compared with the irrigated condition. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed differential expression of a set of sweetpotato transcription factors and protein kinases among greenhouse-grown plants subjected to well-watered conditions and water deficit during 5 DAT. A significant enhancement of expression was observed for known drought stress-associated genes such as an abscisic acid-responsive elements-binding factor, dehydration-responsive element-binding factor, and homeo-domain-zip proteins. Members of calcium-binding proteins showed differential expression under drought stress. For the first time it is reported that knotted1-like homeobox and BEL1-like genes showed altered expression in response to drought stress under a greenhouse condition. In summary, the results suggest that water deprivation during the SR formation period influences root development and expression patterns of stress-responsive genes and those previously found associated with SR formation in sweetpotato.

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