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  • Author or Editor: Akira Sugiura x
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Callus cultures were initiated in the dark from leaf primordia, stem internodes, and young leaves of adult Japanese persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) to induce adventitious buds. A high frequency of regeneration occurred on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) with half the normal NH4NO3 and KNO3 concentration (1/2N) and containing 10 μm zeatin or 1 μm 4PU-30 in combination with 0.1 μm IAA, or MS(1/2N) medium containing 0.03 to 0.1 μ m IAA or 0.01 to 0.03 μm NAA combined with 10 μm zeatin. No significant differences in the capacity of regeneration were observed among the calli from different explant sources. Only eight of 16 cultivars formed adventitious buds on MS(1/2N) medium containing 10 μm zeatin and 0.1 μm IAA, with the percentage of explants forming adventitious buds ranging from 2% to 72%. Chemical names used: indole3-acetic acid (IAA); 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA); N-phenyl-N'-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)urea (4PU-30).

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Abstract

Ethanol production in the seeds and its accumulation in the flesh were compared among 47 Japanese persimmon cultivars (Diospyros kaki L.) in relation to their degree of astringency. Those which produce relatively high amounts of ethanol and accumulate it in the flesh, i.e. pollination-variant/nonastringent (PVNA) cultivars, lose astringency on the tree, while those producing less ethanol, i.e. pollination-variant/astringent (PVA) ones, remain astringent. Pollination-constant/nonastringent (PCNA) and pollination-constant/astringent (PCA) cultivars generally produced little ethanol in the seeds and accumulated small amounts or none in the flesh. Thus, 2 different mechanisms exist that are involved in the loss of astringency. One is associated with PVNA, PVA, and PCA types and is dependent upon the production and accumulation of ethanol and presumably acetaldehyde. The second is associated with PCNA types which apparently do not produce these volatile substances.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Leaf extracts of 163 Japanese persimmon cultivars (Diospyros kaki L.) and six other Diospyros species were analyzed for isozyme variation of glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI, E C 5.3.1.9) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH, E C 1.1.1.37). With both systems, the bands were sharp and well-resolved, and intracultivar polymorphism was absent. Isozyme phenotypes were more varied with GPI than with MDH. With Japanese persimmons, GPI yielded 24 different banding patterns, and six cultivars were uniquely discriminated by this enzyme alone. MDH produced only three different banding patterns, with none of the cultivars discriminated. When both enzyme systems were taken together, 18 cultivars were uniquely discriminated and the rest could be classified into 22 groups of 2 to 18 cultivars each.

Open Access

Interspecific hybrids between Diospyros glandulosa (2n = 2x = 30) and D. kaki cv. Jiro (2n = 6x = 90) were produced by electrofusion of protoplasts. Protoplasts were isolated from calli derived from leaf primordia, fused electrically, and cultured by agarose-bead culture using modified KM8p medium. Relative nuclear DNA contents of calli derived from fusion-treated protoplasts were determined by flow cytometry. One-hundred-forty-nine of 166 calli obtained had the nuclear DNA content of the sum of those of D. glandulosa and D. kaki cv. Jiro. RAPD analysis showed that the 149 callus lines yielded specific bands for both D. glandulosa and D. kaki cv. Jiro and they appeared to be interspecific somatic hybrid calli. Shoots were regenerated from 63 of the 149 interspecific hybrid calli. PCR-RFLP of chloroplast DNA analysis, flow cytometric determination of nuclear DNA content, and RAPD analysis revealed that the 63 interspecific hybrid shoot lines contained nuclear genome from both the parents but only chloroplast genome from D. glandulosa. Microscopic observation of root tip cells confirmed that somatic chromosome numbers of the interspecific hybrids were 2n = 8x = 120.

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Abstract

Gibberellic acid at 50, 100, and 200 ppm sprayed on leaves of bearing Kaki shoots 3 clays before harvest greatly increased the storage life of fruit. In Hiratanenashi cultivar, GA sprayed fruits had more than double the storage life of unsprayed fruits. Sprayed fruits also remained firm on the tree, so period of harvest could be extended. Sprayed trees showed delay in defoliation. No injurious effects of the spray were observed.

Open Access

A method for collecting the vacuolar contents of intact tannin and parenchyma cells of persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) fruit using a micropipette was developed. Thin sections of the mesocarp tissue from mature persimmon fruit, `Miyazaki-mukaku' and `Hiratanenashi', were placed on a glass slide. Using a micromanipulator and an inverted microscope, a micropipette was inserted into a vacuole and its contents were withdrawn. A 5-nL sample of vacuole sap was collected per tannin cell from `Hiratanenashi' and 7 nL from `Miyazaki-mukaku', whereas only 2 nL was withdrawn from adjacent parenchyma cells. Analyses of the vacuolar sap revealed that the tannin cells of both cultivars contained 10% to 12% (m/v) of tannin as (+)-catechin equivalents and 10% to 13% (m/v) of soluble sugars, whereas the parenchyma cells contained trace amounts of tannins and ≈20% of soluble sugars. Tannin cells contain only a slight amount of sucrose, in contrast to a relatively large amount in parenchyma cells.

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Abstract

Dormant bud explants taken from mature trees of Japanese persimmon cv. Hiratanenashi were established successfully on modified Murashige and Skoog's medium with nitrate reduced to half-strength [MS (½NO3)] or woody plant medium, both supplemented with 22.2 μM (5 mg°liter−1) BA. Shoot proliferation in subcultures also was best at 22.2 μM (5 mg°liter−1) BA in MS (½NO3) medium, but growth was of the rosette type. Shoot elongation, however, was stimulated the most in the same medium supplemented with 24.6 μM (5 mg°liter−1) 2iP instead of BA. Rooting of the proliferated shoots was enhanced by the treatment with IBA at 1.23 mM (250 mg°liter−1). Chemical names used: N-(phenylmethyl)-1H-purin-6-amine (BA), N-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1H-purin-6-amine (2iP), 1H-indole-3-butanoic acid (IBA).

Open Access

Abstract

Primordial leaves of Japanese persimmon (Diospyros kaki L. cv. Jiro) were excised from dormant buds and cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium with the nitrates reduced to half strength (MS½N) and supplemented with 0.1 to 10.0 µm zeatin + 0.1 to 10.0 µm IAA. After 40 days of culture in the dark, yellowish-white calli were formed at 10.0 µm zeatin + 1.0 µm IAA. When these calli were transferred to MS½N medium supplmented with zeatin (1.0 to 10.0 µm) + IAA (0 to 10.0 µm), 24% of them produced adventitious buds at 10.0 µm zeatin + 0.1 µm IAA under a 12-hr photoperiod. Further shoot growth occurred on the same medium without IAA. Basal ends of the shoots were quick-dipped in 1.25 mm IBA and placed on half-strength MS½ N medium. Nearly two-thirds of the dipped shoots rooted within 30 days. Plantlets regenerated in vitro were then transferred to a mixture of 1 peat: 1 perlite: 1 vermiculite and acclimatized for potting. Chemical names used: 1H-indole-3-acetic acid (IAA); 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA); (E)-2-methyl-4-(1-H-purin-6-ylamino)-2-buten-1-o1 (zeatin).

Open Access

Self-compatible cultivars of Japanese apricot (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) have a horticultural advantage over self-incompatible ones because no pollinizer is required. Self-incompatibility is gametophytic, as in other Prunus species. We searched for molecular markers to identify self-compatible cultivars based on the information about S-ribonucleases (S-RNases) of other Prunus species. Total DNA isolated from five self-incompatible and six self-compatible cultivars were PCR-amplified by oligonucleotide primers designed from conserved regions of Prunus S-RNases. Self-compatible cultivars exhibited a common band of ≈1.5 kbp. Self-compatible cultivars also showed a common band of ≈12.1 kbp when genomic DNA digested with HindIII was probed with the cDNA encoding S 2-RNase of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.). These results suggest that self-compatible cultivars of Japanese apricot have a common S-RNase allele that can be used as a molecular marker for self-compatibility.

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