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  • Author or Editor: A. E. Einert x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Parboiled rice hulls were used in growing media for tulips ‘Hibernia’ and ‘Paul Richter’ grown by the rooting room method for cut flowers. Three-component media of 1 rice hulls: 1 sand. 1 peat (v/v/v), 1 soil: 1 rice hulls: 1 peat and 2 component mixes of 1 rice hulls: 1 peat and 1 soil: 1 rice hulls were compared to standard media of 1 soil: 1 sand:l peat and 1 sand:l peat. Media containing rice hulls produced tulip plants equal to those produced in standard media and the 1 soil: 1 rice hulls medium significantly increased root growth. Rice hulls comprising 1/3 to 1/2 of the growing medium had no appreciable effect on pH, soluble salts, or nutrient element levels of the mix. Leaf tissue analyses also indicated that rice hulls did not contribute nutrients for tulip growth. Media containing rice hulls were lighter in weight and enabled easier handling of the flats. Rice hull media did not pack in the flats; and therefore, facilitated easier harvesting of the tulip plant with the bulb attached.

Open Access

Abstract

Four-hour dark period interruptions of incandescent, red and far-red radiation each night during natural cooling hastened flowering by 22, 15 and 8 days, respectively, over natural daylengths. No additional acceleration occurred when night breaks were applied during natural cooling and forcing as compared to lighting during natural cooling only. The accelerating effect of night breaks was found to be the response to light alone and not total radiant energy or temperature. Bloom date acceleration by night breaks of incandescent light was due to a proportionate acceleration in flower bud initiation. For every week of acceleration there was an average decrease of 2 flower buds and 7 leaves per stem. Bulb potting depth also influenced bloom date. The depth effects on flowering time were independent of lighting treatments. A 4-day acceleration was obtained by setting the bulb nose at the soil line as compared to a 2 inch planting depth.

Plant height was independently influenced by photoperiod-light quality and by potting depth. Height was only slightly affected by supplemental lighting during natural cooling. After forcing temperatures were reached, red and incandescent lighting caused slight height increases while far-red caused pronounced stem stretching. Exposure of the bulb above the soil at potting reduced plant height at maturity.

Open Access

Abstract

Intact stem apices of Lilium longiflorum Thunb. cv. ‘Ace’ were prepared for scanning electron microscopy to determine floral initiation and differentiation by viewing topographical changes. The apices, after removal of leaves under running water, were frozen in liquid N2, freeze-dried on carbon discs and coated with carbon prior to viewing. Electron photomicrographs were taken of vegetative, transitional and reproductive apices. This method of tissue preparation permitted microscopic evidence of flower bud initiation and differentiation to be obtained in less than 9 hr after removal of the apex from the plant. The apices retained their in vivo configuration, but as dry, permanent, 3-dimensional mounts. Cell net studies of the apical meristem are possible with this technique. This method of preparation is also adaptable to light microscopy.

Open Access