Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 79 items for

  • Author or Editor: Carl E. Sams x
Clear All Modify Search

Glucosinolates (GSs) and carotenoids are important plant secondary metabolites present in several plant species, including arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Although genotypic and environmental regulation of GSs and carotenoid compounds has been reported, few studies present data on their regulation at the molecular level. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore differential expression of genes associated with GSs and carotenoids in arabidopsis in response to selenium fertilization, shown previously to impact accumulations of both classes of metabolites in Brassica species. Arabidopsis was grown under 0.0 or 10.0 μM Na2SeO4 in hydroponic culture. Shoot and root tissue samples were collected before anthesis to measure GSs and carotenoid compounds and conduct gene expression analysis. Gene expression was determined using arabidopsis oligonucleotide chips containing more than 31,000 genes. There were 1274 differentially expressed genes in response to selenium (Se), of which 516 genes were upregulated. Ontology analysis partitioned differentially expressed genes into 20 classes. Biosynthesis pathway analysis using AraCyc revealed that four GSs, one carotenoid, and one chlorophyll biosynthesis pathways were invoked by the differentially expressed genes. Involvement of the same gene in more than one biosynthesis pathway indicated that the same enzyme may be involved in multiple GS biosynthesis pathways. The decrease in carotenoid biosynthesis under Se treatment occurred through the downregulation of phytoene synthase at the beginning of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. These findings may be useful to modify the GS and carotenoid levels in arabidopsis and may lead to modification in agriculturally important plant species.

Free access

The effects of 36 organosilicone and conventional carbon-based surfactants on postharvest infiltration of radiolabeled and unlabeled Ca solutions into `Golden Delicious' apples (Malus domestica Borkh) were examined to devise a more efficient pressure infiltration technique to increase fruit Ca concentration. Radiolabeled Ca infiltration and the proportional increase in fruit Ca estimated by fruit weight gain from Ca solutions of known concentration were significantly enhanced by a range of surfactants having different chemical structures. Tween 60 and 80; Triton X-45, X-100, X-114, X-305, and X-405; and Silwet L-77 and L-7604 enhanced Ca infiltration. The two organosilicone surfactants, Silwet L-77 and Silwet L-7604, known for their greater capacity to lower the surface tension of solutions than conventional carbon-based surfactants, were the most effective at augmenting Ca infiltration. Applications of surfactants to fruit were as or more effective when used as a pretreatment rather than mixing the surfactant with the Ca solutions. The pressure necessary to increase Ca to levels considered sufficient to maintain fruit firmness and resist decay during storage could be lowered in fruit treated with organosilicone surfactants. Sequential postharvest surfactant and Ca treatments may be a practical means of increasing the Ca concentration in apples.

Free access

`Golden Delicious' apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) were treated after harvest with heat (air at 38 °C for 4 days or 42 °C for 1 day) or 2% CaCl2 (w/v; applied as a dip or pressure-infiltrated) or a combination of the two and stored at 0 °C for ≤6 months. Decay caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr. after inoculation to a depth of 2 mm with a conidial suspension virtually was eliminated in stored fruit heated at 38 °C, regardless of Ca treatment. Apples punctured to a depth of 0.5 mm (but not 2 mm) and inoculated with B. cinerea on removal from storage were almost completely protected from poststorage decay if they had previously been pressure-infiltrated with 2% CaCl2, regardless of the heat regime. Heating fruit at 42 °C and dipping in 2% CaCl2 were only partially effective in preventing decay from either pre- or poststorage inoculations. Fruit firmness was not related to resistance to decay.

Free access

Heating `Golden Delicious' apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) for 4 days at 38C or pressure-infiltrating them with a 4% CaCl2 solution reduced decay and maintained fruit firmness during 6 months of storage at 0C. Heating reduced decay caused by Penicillium expansum Link ex Thorn by ≈30%, while pressure infiltration with CaCl2 reduced decay by >60%. Pressure infiltration with CaCl2 after heating reduced decay by ≈40%. Pressure infiltration maintained firmness best (>84 N), as measured with a manually driven electronic fruit-firmness probe, followed by heat and CaCl2 (76 N), heat alone (71 N), and no treatment (control) (60 N). Force vs. deformation (FD) curves from a puncture test with a fruit-firmness probe mounted in a universal testing machine showed that fruit heated before storage were firmer than all nonheated fruit, except those pressure-infiltrated with 4% CaCl2. However, FD curves also showed that apples pressure-infiltrated with 4% CaCl2 differed quantitatively from apples in all other treatments, including those heated.

Free access

Prestorage infiltration of `Golden Delicious' apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) with calcium (Ca) retarded texture changes during storage at 0C and inhibited ethylene production of the fruit at 20C. Infiltration of the fruit with the polyamines (PA) putrescine (PUT) or spermidine (SPD) also altered texture changes, but did not inhibit ethylene production. When the fruit were treated with Ca first and then with PA, cell wall-hound Ca concentrations increased 4-fold, but PA levels in the cell wall increased only slightly. When the fruit were treated with PA first and then with Ca, PA levels in the cell wall increased 3-fold, but Ca concentration increased only 2-fold. These results indicate that Ca and PA may he competing for the same binding sites in the cell wall and that the improvement of fruit quality during storage by these cations could involve strengthening of the cell wall.

Free access

`Golden Delicious' apples (Malus domestics Borkh.) were treated with heat or CaCl2 solutions or a combination thereof to determine the effects of these treatments on decay and quality of fruit in storage. Heat treatment at 38C for 4 days, pressure infiltration with 2% or 4% solutions of CaCl2, or a combination of both, with heat following CaCl2 treatment affected decay and firmness during 6 months of storage at 0C. The heat treatment alone reduced decay caused by Botrytis cinerea (Pers.:Fr.) by ≈30%, while heat in combination with a 2% CaC12 solution reduced decay by ≈60 %. Calcium chloride solutions of 2% or 4% alone reduced decay by 40 % and 60 %, respectively. Heat treatments, either alone or in combination with CaC12 treatments, maintained firmness (80 N) best, followed by fruit infiltrated with 2% or 4% solutions of CaCl2 alone (70 N) and the nontreated controls (66 N). Instron Magness-Taylor and Instron compression test curves show that heat-treated fruit differed qualitatively and quantitatively from nonheated fruit. Heat treatment did not increase the amount of infiltrated Ca bound to the cell wall significantly, and a combination of heat treatment after CaCl2 infiltration increased surface injury over those fruit heated or infiltrated with CaCl2 solutions alone.

Free access

Previous research in our group demonstrated that short-duration exposure to narrow-band blue wavelengths of light can improve the nutritional quality of sprouting broccoli (Brassica oleacea var. italica) microgreens. The objective of this study was to measure the impact of different percentages of blue light on the concentrations of nutritional quality parameters of sprouting broccoli microgreens and to compare incandescent/fluorescent light with light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Microgreen seeds were cultured hydroponically on growing pads under light treatments of: 1) fluorescent/incandescent light; 2) 5% blue (442 to 452 nm)/95% red (622 to 632 nm); 3) 5% blue/85% red/10% green (525 to 535 nm); 4) 20% blue/80% red; and 5) 20% blue/70% red/10% green in controlled environments. Microgreens were grown at an air temperature of 24 °C and a 16-hour photoperiod using a light intensity of 250 μmol·m−2·s−1 for all light treatments. On emergence of the first true leaf, a nutrient solution of 42 mg·L−1 nitrogen (N) (20% Hoagland’s #2 solution) was used to submerge the growing pads. Microgreens were harvested after 20 days under the light treatments and shoot tissues were processed and measured for nutritionally important shoot pigments, glucosinolates, and mineral nutrients. Microgreens under the fluorescent/incandescent light treatment had significantly lower shoot fresh mass than plants under the 5% blue/95% red, 5% blue/85% red/10% green, and the 20% blue/80% red LED light treatments. The highest concentrations of shoot tissue chlorophyll, β-carotene, lutein, total carotenoids, calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), boron (B), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), glucoiberin, glucoraphanin, 4-methoxyglucobrassicin, and neoglucobrassicin were found in microgreens grown under the 20% blue/80% red light treatment. In general, the fluorescent/incandescent light treatment resulted in significantly lower concentrations of most metabolites measured in the sprouting broccoli tissue. Results from the current study clearly support data from many previous reports that describe stimulation of primary and secondary metabolite biosynthesis by exposure to blue light wavelengths from LEDs.

Free access

Glucosinolates are sulfur-containing secondary plant metabolites commonly found in the family Brassicaceae. The presence of selenium in soils increases the uptake of sulfur and inhibits the production of glucosinolates in brassicaceous plants. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of selenium's impact on sulfur uptake and glucosinolate production in Brassica oleracea L. Rapid-cycling B. oleracea plants were grown hydroponically in half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution with selenium treatments delivered as sodium selenate concentrations of 0.0, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.5 mg·L−1. Elevated sulfur treatments of 37 mg·L−1 sulfate and 37 mg·L−1 sulfate/0.75 mg·L−1 selenate were incorporated to compare with selenium treatments. Plants were harvested and freeze-dried 1 day before anthesis. Selenium and sulfur content of plant tissue was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and a carbon–nitrogen–sulfur analyzer. Glucosinolate content of leaf tissue was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Selenium and sulfur uptake in plants positively correlated with selenium concentration in the nutrient solution. The sulfur concentration of plants exposed to selenium equaled or exceeded the sulfur concentration of plants exposed to elevated sulfur. Despite higher sulfur concentrations, there occurred a statistically significant decrease in production of five of the seven glucosinolates analyzed in selenium-enriched plants. Plants that underwent elevated sulfur treatments had higher glucosinolate production than selenium-treated plants. These results suggest that selenium either upregulates or prevents the downregulation of sulfur uptake in B. oleracea. In addition, the presence of selenium within the plant appears to have a negative impact on the production of certain glucosinolates despite adequate availability of sulfur.

Free access

`Golden Delicious' and `Red Rome' apples were pressure infiltrated (69 kPa for 2 or 4 min) at harvest with 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4%, and 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8% CaCl2 solutions (w/v), respectively, and placed in 0°C storage. Juice was extracted from the apples after 0, 2, 4 or 6 months in storage. Sensory evaluation of the juice was conducted to determine if CaCl2 concentration affected color, off-flavors, suspended particles or overall acceptability of the juice. Juice color was judged lighter with increased CaCl2 in both cultivars. Detection of off-flavors decreased as CaCl2 was increased in juice from `Red Rome'; whereas, off-flavors increased as CaCl2 was increased in `Golden Delicious' juice. CaCl2 treatments decreased suspended particles in both cultivars. As CaCl2 was increased overall acceptability of juice from `Red Rome' increased, while acceptability of juice from `Golden Delicious' decreased.

Free access

`Golden Delicious' and `Red Rome' apples were pressure infiltrated (69 kPa for 2 or 4 min) at harvest with 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4%, and 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8% CaCl2 solutions (w/v), respectively, and placed in 0°C storage. Juice was extracted from the apples after 0, 2, 4 or 6 months in storage. Sensory evaluation of the juice was conducted to determine if CaCl2 concentration affected color, off-flavors, suspended particles or overall acceptability of the juice. Juice color was judged lighter with increased CaCl2 in both cultivars. Detection of off-flavors decreased as CaCl2 was increased in juice from `Red Rome'; whereas, off-flavors increased as CaCl2 was increased in `Golden Delicious' juice. CaCl2 treatments decreased suspended particles in both cultivars. As CaCl2 was increased overall acceptability of juice from `Red Rome' increased, while acceptability of juice from `Golden Delicious' decreased.

Free access