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  • Author or Editor: R. J. Henny x
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Twenty-two spathiphyllum cultivars were evaluated for resistance to Cylindrocladium root rot (CRR). Four isolates of the fungus Cylindrocladium spathiphylli Shoult., El-Gholl & Alf. were selected from two different locations each in Florida and Hawaii. Spores of isolates were applied as a soil drench in replicated experiments using a randomized complete block design. The most severe symptoms were those produced by C. spathiphylli isolates from Hawaii. None of the spathiphyllum cultivars tested were highly resistant to CRR although resistance among the cultivars was observed. The cultivars Chris and Textura were the most promising cultivars, having fairly uniform resistance to the four isolates of C. spathiphylli. The cultivars Cupido, Daniel, Frederik, Jetty, and Vanessa were moderately resistant when combined data from all tests were analyzed. Results from this research permit the selection of more resistant breeding lines and also creates a baseline against which resistance of newly developed cultivars can be compared.

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Abstract

Relatively few Dieffenbachia cultivars have become widely grown, although they have been important ornamental tropical foliage plants for many years. Most new cultivars have originated from private plant collections or by mutation from commercial cultivars, with breeding playing a minor role. A Dieffenbachia breeding program was initiated in 1976 at the Central Florida Research and Education Center at Apopka, which resulted in three previous cultivar releases (Henny et al., 1987a, 1987b, 1988). ‘Starry Nights’, herein described, is the fourth Dieffenbachia hybrid to be released from that program.

Open Access

Abstract

Dieffenbachia species and cultivars are important tropical ornamental foliage plants due to their attractive foliar variegation, ease of production, and adaptability to interior environments. About 20 cultivars have been produced commercially in Florida. Previously, most new cultivars were obtained from private plant collections or as mutations of established cultivars. Because dieffenbachia occur naturally in a variety of sizes, growth habits, and variegation patterns, they were included as part of the foliage plant breeding program at the Central Florida Research and Education Center–Apopka. The hybrid Dieffenbachia cultivar Triumph was developed and selected as part of that program.

Open Access

Abstract

Dieffenbachia species and cultivars have been important ornamental tropical foliage plants for many years. Their attractive foliar variegation, ease of production, and adaptability to interior environments are major reasons for their importance as commercial foliage plants. About 20 cultivars have been produced commercially in Florida. Most new cultivars were obtained from private plant collections or as mutations of established cultivars. Because dieffenbachias occur naturally in a diversity of sizes, growth habits, and variegation patterns, they were included as part of the foliage plant breeding program at the Central Florida Research and Education Center—Apopka. The hybrid Dieffenbachia × ‘Victory’, herein described, was developed and selected as a part of the program.

Open Access

Abstract

Although Dieffenbachia have been important ornamental tropical foliage plants for many years, relatively few cultivars have become widely grown. Most new cultivars have originated from private plant collections or mutations of commercial cultivars, with breeding playing a small role. Due to the natural diversity of this genus, a breeding program involving Dieffenbachia was initiated in 1976 at the Central Florida Research and Education Center, Apopka. ‘Tropic Star’, herein described, is the third hybrid Dieffenbachia to be released to Florida foliage growers from that program (1, 2).

Open Access

Abstract

Aglaonema species and cultivars are valuable ornamental foliage plants because of their tolerance of interior environments. A few man-made hybrids have become commercially important, although most new cultivars have been obtained directly from jungle exploration. About 20 Aglaonema cultivars are currently produced in Florida. Recent discoveries of Aglaonema species with unique foliar variegation patterns and petiole coloration have significantly added to the available germplasm. Many such plants were obtained and included as part of the foliage plant breeding program at the Central Florida Research and Education Center, Apopka. The hybrid Aglaonema cultivar Stripes herein described, was developed from that program.

Open Access

Abstract

Many cultivars of Anthurium andraeanum are grown for production of cut flowers because of their large and showy spathes, which occur in shades of red, orange, pink, or white. Most A. andraeanum have been bred for large spathes, which may reach 0.25 m in length and 0.16 m in width. However, their long petioles and large leaves are not in good proportion for growing as a pot plant. Since A. andraeanum can be grown under the same cultural conditions as ornamental foliage plants, attempts were made to produce hybrids suitable for use as potted ‘flowering’ foliage plants.

Open Access