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  • Author or Editor: B. K. Harbaugh x
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Abstract

The minimum water requirement to produce the greatest number of marketa- bie cut flowers of Chrysanthemum × morifolium Ramat. ‘Manatee Yellow Iceberg’ was 35 cm with trickle irrigation, a 91% reduction in water uses as compared to overhead irrigation systems. Linear responses for fresh weight, dry weight, leaf area, leaf number, and flower number between 13.6 and 40.7 cm of water supplied during production indicated that an additional 6 cm of water would improve marketable stem's quality.

Open Access

Abstract

Damage by leafminer [Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)], increased linearly as leaf nitrogen increased from 2.2% to 4.0% in spring and fall plantings of Chrysanthemum x morifolium Ramat. ‘Manatee Yellow Iceberg’. The number of marketable stems was related quadratically to leaf nitrogen with maximum yields estimated to occur at 3.6% at harvest.

Open Access

Abstract

Interactive effects of trickle irrigation rates, cultivars and culture (single or pinched stem), on Chrysanthemum × morifolium Ramat. cut flower yield and quality were evaluated. The minimum amount of water required to produce the greatest number of marketable stems of high quality was estimated to be from 0.96 to 1.07 cm/day. Responses to irrigation rate were similar regardless of culture or cultivar variables. Seasonal water use, however, would vary due to differences in cropping time influenced by the production method and choice of cultivars.

Open Access

Seedlings of commercial lisianthus cultivars form rosettes when grown at 25 to 28°C. Rosetted plants have a basal cluster of leaves, very short internodes typical of biennials, and do not bolt or flower for months without being exposed to 3 to 4 weeks at <15 to 18°C to reverse heat-induced rosetting. Semirosetted plants develop when seedlings are grown at a constant 22 to 25°C or at <22°C night with >28°C day. Semirosetted plants have one or more side shoots which may elongate and flower, but plants flower unpredictably and are of poor quality as cut flowers or potted plants. `Maurine Blue' and Florida Blue' were released from the Univ. of Florida in 1995. To our knowledge, they are the first heat-tolerant lisianthus cultivars. Seedlings and plants can be grown at 28 to 31°C without rosetting. `Maurine Blue' ranged in height from 38 cm (summer) to 67 cm (spring) during 1994 and 1995 production trials in Florida. `Maurine Blue' has potential for use as a tall bedding plant if sold as green transplants, a flowering potted plant if grown with three plants per 15-cm-diameter pot with a growth retardant, or as a bouquet-type cut flower. `Florida Blue' plants (38 cm) grown in an 11.5-cm square pot (0.65-L) with capillary mat irrigation were similar in height to `Blue Lisa' (32 cm) and taller than `Little Belle Blue' (22 cm) and `Mermaid Blue' (24 cm). `Florida Blue' was designated as a semi-dwarf cultivar with an intended use as a bedding plant. Growth retardants would be useful for production in pots <10 to 12 cm in diameter. Complete descriptive information, photographs and pedigrees will be presented.

Free access

Abstract

Experiments were designed to develop information on commercial production systems for Episcia cupreata (Hook.) Hanst. (flame violet) encompassing nutrition, propagation, light intensity, and insect pest management. A 200–250 ppm N and 150 ppm K solution applied at a rate of 50 ml/10-cm pot per week provided adequate nutritional requirements for these major elements. Propagation techniques involving combinations of rooted or unrooted plantlets 5–13 cm in canopy diameter provided crop turnover rates from 4 to 12 weeks for production in 10-cm pots. Optimum light intensity was established at 17–22 klx. Acephate and oxamyl eliminated mealybugs (Ferrisia virgata) on Episcia plants and were not phytotoxic to the foliage.

Open Access

Abstract

A study was conducted to investigate environmental factors which affect leaf water potential (LWP) response of chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum × morifolium Ramat). Meteorological parameters, including air temperature (TEMP), relative humidity (HUM), total solar radiation (RAD), and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were measured simultaneously as LWP determinations were made diurnally for plants grown with 5 different irrigation rates. Stepwise multiple regression analyses using the meteorological parameters as independent variables and LWP as the dependent variable showed that models developed for each irrigation rate included TEMP, HUM, and PAR as statistically significant (P = 5%) independent variables. Coefficients of determination (R2) for the models ranged from 0.83–0.87. A combined model, including irrigation rate (R) as an independent variable along with the meteorological parameters, revealed that TEMP, PAR, HUM, and R were statistically significant at P = 1% and had an R2 = 0.84. Results reveal environmental factors which must be considered in studies involving LWP measurements for chrysanthemums in order to avoid misinterpretation of data.

Open Access

Bacteriophages specific to Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii (Xcp), the causal agent of bacterial blight of geranium, Pelargonium ×hortorum L.H. Bailey, were isolated from soil and sludge samples from Florida, California, Minnesota, and Utah. Sixteen phages were evaluated for their potential to lyse 21 Xcp strains collected from around the world. The Xcp strains varied in their susceptibility to the phage isolates with 4 to 14 phages producing a lytic or highly virulent reaction. A mixture of five h-mutants was developed from phages that exhibited the broadest host-ranges and tested against the same Xcp strains. The h-mutant phage mixture lysed all 21 Xcp strains. Three experiments were designed to determine the efficacy of using a mixture of four h-mutant phages to control the spread of the bacterial blight pathogen on potted and seedling geraniums under greenhouse conditions. Plants surrounding diseased inoculated plants were treated with a phage mixture at 5 × 108 pfu/mL daily, biweekly, or triweekly, or treated with Phyton-27®, at 2.0 mL·L-1 every 10 or 14 days. In potted geraniums, daily foliar sprays of the phage mixture had reduced disease incidence and severity by 50% and 75%, respectively, relative to control plants after 6 weeks. In two plug experiments, the phage mixture applied daily also had reduced disease incidence and severity by 69% and 86%, and 85% and 92%, respectively, when compared with controls after 5 weeks. In all three experiments, disease incidence and severity were less for plants treated daily with phages than for those treated less frequently with phages or with Phyton-27®. Chemical name used: copper sulfate pentahydrate (Phyton-27®).

Free access

A mixture of host-range mutant (h-mutant) bacteriophages specific for tomato race 1 (T1) and race 3 (T3) of the bacterial spot pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Doidge) Dye was evaluated for biological control of bacterial spot on `Sunbeam' tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) transplants and field-grown plants for two seasons (Fall 1997 and Fall 1998). Foliar applications of bacteriophages were compared with similar applications of water (control) and of copper/mancozeb bactericides, the commonly used chemical control strategy for tomato seedling and field production. In 1997, the incidence of bacterial spot on greenhouse-grown seedlings was reduced from 40.5% (control) to 5.5% or 0.9% for bactericide- or bacteriophage-treated plants, respectively. In 1998, the incidence of bacterial spot was 17.4% on control plants vs. 5.5% and 2.7% for bactericide- and bacteriophage-treated plants, respectively, although these differences were not statistically significant at P ≤ 0.05. Applications of bacteriophages to field-grown tomatoes decreased disease severity as measured by the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC) by 17.5% (1997) and 16.8% (1998) compared with untreated control plants. Preharvest plant vigor ratings, taken twice during each field season, were higher in the bacteriophage-treated plants than in either bactericide-treated plants or nontreated controls except for the early vigor rating in 1998. Use of bacteriophages increased total weight of extra-large fruit 14.9% (1997) and 24.2% (1998) relative to that of nontreated control plants, and 37.8% (1997) and 23.9% (1998) relative to that of plants treated with the chemical bactericides. Chemical names used: manganese, zinc, carboxyethylene bis dithiocarbamate (mancozeb).

Free access

Abstract

In Florida, most producers of cut chrysanthemums (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev.) use overhead irrigation systems and fertilize with soluble fertilizer injected through the system. Trickle irrigation can be used to produce cut chrysanthemums with substantial savings in water (2). Controlled-release fertilizers can be successfully used to produce cut chrysanthemums (1) and may be advantageous in certain production situations (3). Direct yield comparisons influenced by the four possible combinations of irrigation and fertilization practices have not been researched in previous studies. We, therefore, evaluated main and interactive effects of overhead or trickle irrigation in conjunction with soluble or controlled-release fertilization on the yield and postharvest quality of cut chrysanthemums.

Open Access

Abstract

Chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat cv. Jackpot) forced in 10 cm pots were test marketed for 8 days through a mass market outlet at prices ranging from $1.87 to $0.87 per plant. At low retail prices, consumers bought sufficiently more plants to partially or totally offset reduced retailer’s return per plant. At $0.60 wholesale, retailer’s gross margins were $10.10, $25.41, $36.92, and $32.94 at retail prices of $1.87, $1.37, $1.12, and $0.87, respectively.

Open Access