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  • Author or Editor: W. A. Dozier Jr. x
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Abstract

Foliar and dormant shoot nutrient content and tree survival of ‘Loring’ and ‘Redhaven’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] on 8 seedling rootstocks (Lovell, Halford, Harrow W-208, NA8, Nemagard, Siberian C, NC NRL-4, and NC 152-AI-2) were determined during 2 seasons. Foliar Ca levels of both ‘Loring’ and ‘Redhaven’ peach trees were lower on Siberian C rootstock than on any other rootstock in the study. Dormant stem Ca levels were lower when cultivars were on Siberian C rootstock than when on most other rootstocks. Cultivars on Siberian C had lower foliar K levels than most other scion/rootstock combinations. Some differences in foliar and stem N, P, Mg, and Mn levels were evident; however, these differences generally were small and inconsistent. After 6 years in the orchard, greatest tree loss occurred with ‘Loring’ on Siberian C and ‘Redhaven’ on Siberian C or NA-8. Other rootstocks did not affect tree survival of either cultivar. Tree width was smallest with Siberian C rootstock, but few differences in trunk circumference and tree height were observed.

Open Access

Abstract

Three rootstock—Elberta seedling (Elb), Lovell seedling (Lov), and Vila Fria seedling (VF)—were evaluated on an old peach-orchard site to determine their susceptibility to nematodes and their effect on growth, yield, survival, and foliar nutrient content of ‘Loring’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch]. During the first 6 years of the orchard's life, mortality rates of the trees were 18% (Elb), 21% (Lov), and 47% (VF). Rootstock did not affect tree height, spread, trunk circumference, or yield the first 3 crop years. However, Lov produced higher yields the 4th crop year and had a greater cumulative yield for the first 4 crop years than Elb or VF. When tree loss was taken into account, tree yield per hectare did not differ with Lov and Elb but was lower with VF. Rootstock did not affect nutrient level in the foliage. Nematode populations were low in the orchard and were unaffected by rootstock. Tree loss, yield differences, and cropping efficiency of trees on the different rootstock could not be accounted for by foliar nutrient levels, nematode populations, tree vigor, or size.

Open Access

Average leaf area (LA) and petiole length (PL) was determined for 13 red maple selections May–Sept. 1993. Bloom types were determined based on the predominate flower structures present in Spring 1993 and 1994. Leaves were collected from an existing field study installed in Mar. 1990. Trees were drip-irrigated throughout the study, thereby eliminating moisture stress concerns. Acer×freemanii `Scarsen' (LA = 131.5 cm2), `Morgan' (LA = 93.6 cm2), and `Autumn Blaze' (LA = 83.9 cm2) had the largest leaves. Acer rubrum `Autumn Flame' (LA = 40.0 cm2) had the smallest leaves. Acer rubrum `October Glory' (PL = 17.1 cm) had the longest petioles followed by `Fairview Flame' (PL = 15.4 cm). Shortest cultivar petioles were on A. rubrum `Franksred' (PL = 9.3 cm) and `Tilford' (PL = 9.3 cm). Flowers were predominately pistillate on `Autumn Flame', `Franksred', `Morgan', `October Glory', `Redskin', `Scarsen', and `Schlesingeri'. Flowers were predominately staminate on `Fairview Flame', `Karpick', `Northwood', and `Tilford'. `Autumn Blaze' did not exhibit flowers in 1993 or 1994. Some seedlings in the study were pistillate, and others were staminate.

Free access

Production of high tunnel tomatoes and snapdragons was evaluated over a 2-year period at the Wiregrass Experiment Station, in southeastern Alabama. `BHN 640', `Florida 91', `Sunleaper', and `Carolina Gold', were evaluated in early Spring 2004. Results indicated that `BHN 640' outperformed `Florida 91' and `Carolina Gold' in early production of high tunnel grown tomatoes. A late Fall 2005 study examined `BHN 640' and `Florida 91'. Results indicated that `BHN 640' was superior to `Florida 91' in total marketable fruit. Season extension of both spring and fall tomato production were accomplished. A planting date study was completed in the early Spring 2005. The following four planting dates were evaluated: 31 Jan., 17 Feb., 4 Mar., and 25. Mar 2005. Wind damage to the high tunnel caused some mortality; however, the two earliest planting dates (31 Jan. and 17 Feb. 2005) produced over 10 lbs. of marketable tomatoes per plant. These were both superior to the last planting date of 25 Mar 2005. Cut snapdragons were evaluated for suitable colored mulch (red, white, or blue) and varieties for summer (`Opus Yellow', `Opus Rose', `Monaco Red', and `Potomac Early White') and fall (`Apollo Purple', `Apollo Yellow', `Monaco Red', `Monaco Rose', and `Potomac Early Orange') production. Results indicated that inflorescence length was affected by the color of mulch. The red mulch had increased inflorescence length compared to the white in Summer 2005. The Fall 2005 study revealed that white mulch had longer inflorescence length than the red or blue mulch. Some varietal differences were observed. The `Apollo Purple' had longer stem lengths than all other varieties for the fall study. The summer study revealed that `Opus Yellow' had longer inflorescence lengths than all others but stem lengths were all similar.

Free access

Abstract

Effects of 8 peach seedling rootstocks on tree growth, survival, and fruit yield of ‘Redhaven’ and ‘Loring’ peach scion cultivars were tested in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Lovell seedling rootstock was a standard for comparison. Six years of data indicated that Siberian C was not an acceptable rootstock because tree survival and fruit yield were low. Halford was equivalent to Lovell for tree growth, fruit yield, and survival. Fruit size was unaffected by rootstock. Nemaguard and 2 North Carolina selections were resistant to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) but they were not resistant to ring nematodes [Criconemella xenoplax (Raski) Luc and Raski]. Soil fumigation improved tree survival in nematode-infested soil.

Open Access