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  • Author or Editor: Thomas A. Fretz x
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Abstract

Rooted and unrooted cuttings of geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum, Bailey cv. Irene), poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima, Wild cv. Annette Hegg Dark Red), tallhedge buckthorn (Rhamnus frangula L. cv. Columnaris), Regel's privet (Ligustrum obtusifolium Sieb. & Zuce. cv. Regelianum), and compact European cranberrybush viburnum (Viburnum opulus L. compactum), were stored up to 9 weeks using low pressure (LP) and refrigerated (RF) storage systems at 1.1 to 2.2°C with 95% relative humidity except for the poinsettia and geranium cuttings which were stored at 5±.5°C. Low pressure storage extended the storage life of rooted geranium and poinsettia cuttings 2 weeks beyond that achieved with RF storage. Unrooted geranium and poinsettia cuttings had 2 week and 4 day longer storage periods, with LP than RF storage, respectively. Unrooted compact European cranberry bush viburnum, Regel's privet, and tallhedge buckthorn cuttings stored 6 weeks using LP storage were superior to RF storage. Regardless of treatment, quality of all stored plant materials decreased with increased time in storage.

Open Access

Abstract

Many individuals view the need to deliver an occasional paper at a national meeting as an occupational hazard of their profession. Others take the more optimistic view that the presentation of a paper not only presents an opportunity to assist others, but also offers an excellent means to accelerate one’s career and argue that as much attention should be given to the presentation (both oral and written) as was given to the actual research. There is more at stake than one’s own reputation; after all, in an oral presentation you are holding your colleagues captive.

Open Access

Abstract

The United States has a rich and varied heritage. Beginning with the early settlements of Jamestown, Va., Plymouth, Mass., and St. Augustine, Fla., we have been influenced by a great diversity of climates, natural resources, ethnic populations, and foreign inputs. These influences and their products are well-documented in the traditional artifacts collected in museums: art, furniture, craftwork, and impliments. In communities across this nation many old buildings have been restored and furnished with the help of existing historical records. The desire for accuracy in such an undertaking extends to a need for historically accurate landscaping as well as architecture and furnishings. Horticultural restoration is of increasing interest and concern.

Open Access