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  • Author or Editor: R. E. McDonald x
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The objective of this study was to determine the effects of prestorage heat treatments on chilling tolerance of tomatoes. Mature-green `Agriset' tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), either C2H4-treated or not, were immersed in 42C water for 60 min, held in 38C air for 48 hours, or not treated, and then stored at either 2C (chilled) or 13C (nonchilled) for 14 days before ripening at 20C. Heat-treated fruit stored at 2C and transferred to 20C ripened normally while nonheated fruit decayed before reaching red ripe. Color (a*/b* ratio), lycopene content, and internal quality characteristics of fruit were similar at the red-ripe stage irrespective of method of heat treatment. In red-ripe heat-treated fruit, free sterol levels were significantly higher in chilled fruit than in nonchilled fruit. Heating fruit in 38C air resulted in significantly higher levels of some free sterols compared with heating fruit in 42C water. Of the 15 flavor volatiles analyzed, six showed significantly decreased concentrations as a result of C2H4-treatment and seven showed decreased concentrations when stored at 2C before ripening. Some volatiles were decreased by the heat treatments. Prestorage short- and long-term heat treatments could allow for storage of mature-green tomatoes at lower temperatures with little loss of their ability to ripen normally.

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Mature-green `Sunbeam' tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were treated in varying order with C2H4, 42 °C water for 1 hour, 38 °C air for 2days, held 2 days at 20 °C (partial ripening), or not treated and then stored at 2 °C (chilled) for 14 days before ripening at 20 °C. Heat-treated fruit stored at 2 °C and transferred to 20 °C ripened normally, while 63% of nonheated fruit decayed before reaching the red-ripe stage. Partially ripened fruit developed more chilling injury, were firmer, were lighter, and were less red in color than fruit not partially ripened. Lycopene content and internal quality characteristics of fruit were similar at the red-ripe stage irrespective of sequence of C2H4 exposure, heat treatment, or a partial ripening period. Of the 15 flavor volatiles analyzed, 10 were reduced by storage at 2 °C, Exposure to C2H4 before the air heat treatment reduced the levels of four volatiles, while C2H4 application either before or after the water heat treatment had no effect on flavor volatiles. Two volatiles were decreased and two were increased by partial vipening, Storage at 2 °C decreased the level of cholesterol and increased levels of campesterol and isofucosterol in the free sterol pool. Exposure to C2H4 before or following heat treatments, the method of heat treatment, and partial ripening had little effect on free sterols, steryl esters, steryl glycosides, or acylated steryl glycosides in the pericarp of red-ripe fruit. A shortor long-term heat treatment of mature-green tomatoes could permit storage at low temperatures with little loss in their ability to ripen normally, whereas partial ripening did not reduce chilling injury.

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Mature green `Sunbeam' tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were treated in water for 1 hr at 27 (ambient), 39, 42, 45, or 48°C, and then either ripened at 20°C (nonchilled) or stored at 2°C (chilled) for 14 days before ripening at 20°C. The most-effective heat treatment was 42°C, which reduced decay 67% in chilled fruit and 53% in nonchilled fruit. Heat treatment had no effect on time required to ripen the fruit. Red-ripe tomatoes had higher respiration rates and evolved more ethylene following nonchilling storage, but heat treatment had no effect on respiration or ethylene evolution. Red color development was enhanced by heat treatment, and inhibited by chilling. At red ripe, fruit were firmer as a result of storage at the chilling temperature, while heat treatment had no effect on firmness. Heat-treated fruit were preferred in terms of taste and texture over nontreated fruit in informal taste tests, with the exception of the 45°C treatment. With increasing temperature of heat treatment, there was increased electrolyte leakage following chilling storage. Of the 15 flavor volatiles analyzed, the levels of five were decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment. Storage at the chilling temperature reduced the levels of six flavor volatiles. Prestorage heat treatments can reduce decay with only minimal adverse effects on tomato fruit quality.

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Mature, green tomatoes were either gassed or not gassed with C2H4 for 24 h, immersed in 42C water for 60 min, or held in 38C air for 48 h or not treated, and then stored at either 2C or 13C for 14 days before ripening at 20C. During ripening, the fruit were evaluated for color development, internal quality, and decay and for volatiles when full ripe. Both high-temperature treatments reduced chilling injury and inhibited decay. Days to ripen after removal from storage at 2C or 13C was not influenced by heat treatment method. Color development, lycopene content, and internal quality characteristics of fruit were similar at the ripe stage, irrespective of heat treatment. Of 15 volatiles analyzed, seven showed decreased levels of concentrations as a result of C2H4 gassing, nine showed decreased levels when stored at 2C prior to ripening, and most were unaffected by the heat treatments. Heat treatments appear to be beneficial for maintaining tomato fruit quality.

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Mature green `Sunbeam' tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), were treated in varying order with C2H4, 42°C water for 60 minutes, 38°C air for 48 hours, partial ripening for 48 hours at 20°C, or not treated, and then stored at 2°C for 14 days before ripening at 20°C. Heat treated fruit stored at 2°C and transferred to 20°C ripened normally while 63% of nonheated fruit decayed before reaching red ripe. More chilling injury (CI) developed when C2H4 was applied following heat treatment rather than before. There was more CI in fruit that were 42°C water treated compared with the 38°C air treatment. Less CI developed on fruit that were partially ripened for 2 days at 20°C before a 42°C water treatment rather than following it. At red ripe, nonchilled fruit were firmer than chilled heat treated fruit. Fruit treated in 42°C water were firmer when the heat treatment was applied before the C2H4 treatment rather than following it. Chlorophyll and lycopene content and internal quality characteristics of fruit were similar at the red ripe stage irrespective of C2H4 or heat treatment. Chilling and heat treatments reduced some of the 15 flavor volatiles analyzed. Volatile levels were lower in fruit treated with C2H4 before heat treatment compared with fruit treated with C2H4 following heat treatment. Prestorage heat treatments could allow for storage of mature green tomatoes at low temperatures with little loss in their ability to ripen normally.

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The objective of this work was to determine if lipid composition of grape fruit flavedo tissue differed with canopy position and if changes in flavedo lipid composition occurred during the development of chilling injury (CI). `Marsh grapefruit were harvested from interior (IN) and exterior (EX) canopy positions and stored at 5C for up to 8 weeks. During storage, EX fruit developed severe CI, whereas IN fruit developed only trace CI. Electrolyte leakage from EX fruit flavedo increased during storage and significantly greater than from IN fruit At the time of harvest, flavedo oleate and linoleate, on a μg % basis, were higher in IN than in EX fruit During storage at 5C, the amount of oleate in IN fruit flavedo decreased and was similar to EX fruit after 4 weeks at 5C. The relative amount of flavedo linoleate decreased in IN fruit and increased in EX fruit during storage at 5C and following 8 weeks at 5C was higher in EX fruit than in IN fruit At the time of harvest, total lipid P in flavedo was higher in IN fruit than in EX fruit; during storage the amount of flavedo lipid P in IN fruit decreased and was equivalent to EX fruit following 8 weeks at 5C. Total sterols in flavedo did not differ with canopy position and remained constant during storage.

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Irradiation is being evaluated as a quarantine treatment of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf. `Marsh'), but it can cause damage to the fruit. Research was conducted to determine if preirradiation heat treatments would improve fruit tolerance to irradiation as they improve tolerance to low temperature injury and to determine if canopy position influenced fruit tolerance to irradiation. Initially, grapefruit were irradiated at 0 or 2.0 kGy at a dose rate of 0.14 kGy·min-1 and selected biochemical changes were monitored over time. There was a marked increase in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity following irradiation. Maximum activity (≈18-fold increase) was attained 24 hours after irradiation. Subsequently, grapefruit were harvested from interior and exterior canopy positions and irradiated at 0 or 1.0 kGy at a dose rate of 0.15 kGy·min-1 before storage for 4 weeks at 10 °C. Following storage, pitting of flavedo was the most evident condition defect noted as a result of irradiation. Pitting was observed on 27% and 15% of irradiated exterior and interior canopy fruit, respectively, whereas there was no pitting on nonirradiated fruit. Heat treatment before irradiation decreased susceptibility of fruit to damage. Pitting was 26%, 19%, and 17% when fruit were held 2 hours at 20 (ambient), 38 or 42 °C, respectively. Irradiation-induced PAL activity was reduced by temperature conditioning at 38 or 42 °C. Exterior canopy fruit flavedo contained higher levels of total phenols, including flavanols and coumarins compared with interior canopy fruit. Deposition of lignin was not related to canopy position. Neither irradiation nor heat treatment had an effect on total phenols or lignin deposition. Generally, cholesterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, and isofucosterol were found to be higher in four steryl lipid fractions in exterior canopy fruit compared with interior canopy fruit. Irradiation increased campesterol in the free sterol and steryl glycoside fractions and decreased isofucosterol in the free sterol fraction. Heat treatments had no effect on individual sterol levels. It seems that irradiation causes a stress condition in the fruit, which leads to pitting of peel tissue. Heat treatment before irradiation reduced damaging effects of irradiation.

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Abstract

‘Bearss’ lemons (Citrus limon Burm f.) stored 21 days at 1°C and held 14 days at 21° sustained 15% chilling injury (Cl) compared to 1% after 10° storage and 21° holding period. Decay, predominantly caused by Penicillium digitatum Sacc., was negligible during storage at either 1° or 10°, but developed during the holding period at 21°. After storage at 1° or 10° plus 2 weeks at 21°, decay averaged 7.4% and 0.7%, respectively. Fruit size, method of curing, and presence of oleocellosis were not related to Cl or decay development.

Open Access

Tolerance of many citrus cultivars to low-dose irradiation treatment is not known. Ten citrus cultivars grown in Florida, including the five orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] cultivars, Ambersweet, Hamlin, Navel, Pineapple, and Valencia, and the five mandarin hybrids (Citrus reticulata Blanco), `Fallglo', `Minneola', `Murcott', `Sunburst', and `Temple', were exposed to irradiation at 0, 0.15, 0.3, and 0.45 kGy, and stored for 14 days at 1 °C or 5 °C plus 3 days at 20 °C, to determine dose tolerance based on fruit injury. Softening of `Valencia', `Minneola', `Murcott', and `Temple' was dose-dependent, but that of other cultivars was unaffected. Only `Ambersweet', `Valencia', `Minneola', and `Murcott' did not develop peel pitting at 0.15 kGy or higher. Total soluble solids of `Ambersweet' and `Sunburst' declined slightly with increasing dose. Titratable acidity (TA) of oranges was not affected, but TA of `Sunburst' and `Temple' juice was slightly reduced by irradiation at 0.45 kGy. Juice flavor of `Hamlin', `Navel', `Valencia', and `Minneola', and pulp flavor of `Hamlin', `Valencia', `Fallglo', `Minneola', and `Murcott' was less acceptable after irradiation at 0.3 or 0.45 kGy. The appearance of all cultivars was negatively affected by the loss of glossiness with the 0.45 kGy dose. Less than 1.0% of fruit decayed and irradiation treatment had no effect on decay. Our study indicates that growers and shippers need to be aware that the effects of irradiation on citrus fruits are highly variable and both cultivar-dependent and dose-dependent.

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Freshly harvested `Sharpblue' blueberries (Vaccinium spp.), a hybrid of complex parentage (Sharpe and Sherman, 1976), were irradiated by electron beam at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0 kGy to determine its effects on condition and quality after treatment and subsequent storage. Berry firmness was not affected by increased doses following 1 or 3 days of storage at 1C, but it declined with higher doses when stored for 7 days at 1C. In general, berry flavor and texture declined as dosage increased; however, neither flavor nor texture were rated unacceptable by a sensory panel. Weight loss, decay, soluble solids concentration, acidity, pH, skin color, or waxy bloom were not affected by dosage or storage.

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