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  • Author or Editor: Michael J. Havey x
  • HortScience x
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Garlic has been propagated exclusively by asexual means since time immemorial. The recent discovery of male fertile garlic accessions allowed studies on genetics and garlic improvement. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) based genetic linkage map was developed for garlic using a segregating population derived from one plant of PI 540316. Progenies segregated for male fertility and other morphological characters. Distortion of segregation was observed for most of the markers. This was expected due to the segregation of recessive deleterious alleles present in the garlic genome. The map contained 23 loci distributed on five linkage groups. It covered 319 cM with the average of 18 cM between loci. Linkage with the male fertility (Mf) locus was established with SNP marker AOB155 (26.7 cM).

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Onion pungency is a major quality attribute with many consumers demanding less pungent onions. In recent years, some growers and retailers have attempted to measure pungency of onions produced in different regions to guarantee a desired level of pungency. However, there are few data on the variability among laboratories using standardized protocols to estimate relative levels of pungencies. Onion cultivars were grown in replicated trials at three locations. Random samples of bulbs from each experimental unit were harvested and shipped to at least three cooperating laboratories, each of which measured soluble solids content (SSC) and pungencies using the same techniques. As expected, cultivars and environments showed significant (P < 0.001) differences. For all three trials, laboratories were a highly significant source of variation (P < 0.024 to 0.001) for measurements of SSC and pungency. Therefore, one cannot make recommendations on relative pungencies of the same lots of onions measured by different labs. The onion research community must identify specific procedures to reduce variation among laboratories to develop a more repeatable standardized assay for the measurement of onion pungency.

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