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  • Author or Editor: M. N. Westwood x
  • Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science x
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Abstract

Pear plots established in 1923 and 1926 with trees composed of several rootstock and trunk combinations were assessed for tree size, susceptibility to pear decline and for fruit quality. In general, Pyrus ussuriensis Max. and P. pyrifolia Burm. & Nak. rootstocks resulted in small trees, P. communis L. and P. calleryana Decne. intermediate, and P. betulaefolia Bunge large. The latter was most resistant to decline, followed by P. calleryana and P. communis, with P. pyrifolia and P. ussuriensis susceptible. The use of the oriental hybrid cvs. Variolosa and Tolstoy as interstocks increased the severity of pear decline symptoms though all trees were not uniformly susceptible. The use of the P. communis cv. Old Home as a scion rooted trunkstock decreased the degree of decline. Fruit quality was good on most combinations but was generally better on P. calleryana than other rootstocks. Pyrus betulaefolia caused cork spot and poor quality of ‘Anjou’ but this same rootstock resulted in outstanding quality of ‘Seckel’.

Open Access

Abstract

A pre- or postharvest foliar B application was found to increase fruit set of ‘Italian’ prune (Prunus domestica L.). A prebloom B spray failed to increase set. Neither fall nor spring applications influenced the amount of fruit lost in the midsummer or “blue” drop. All trees involved in the experiment had adequate B by the standard index of tree nutrition, August mid-shoot leaf analysis. Incipient B deficiency did not appear to be involved.

Fall foliar B increased B levels in dormant bud and spur tissues and in flower buds and flowers. A prebloom B spray increased B levels of floral tissues to a lesser degree. The highest B concentration was found in the ovary. Boron concentration in flower buds in April following a fall B spray was as much as five times the amount found in mid-shoot leaves in August. August mid-shoot leaf analysis revealed higher levels in leaves from trees treated the previous fall in only one of the 2 years.

Several morphological and physiological effects of the fall B spray were observed. Among these were a slight delay in the time of bud break, a decrease in the size of flower buds and mature flowers accompanied by reduction of style and pedicel length, and a decrease in pollen germinability. B level of pistil and pollen had no effect on in vivo pollen tube growth rate.

Open Access