Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 31 items for

  • Author or Editor: James R. McFerson x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Philip L. Forsline, Warren F. Lamboy, James R. McFerson and Cecil Stushnoff

The USDA–ARS germplasm collection of cold-hardy Vitis held at the Plant Genetic Resources Unit, Geneva, N.Y., has over 1300 clonal accessions maintained as field-grown vines. Security back-up using field-grown or potted vines at remote sites or via in vitro methods is costly. Cryopreservation offers a safe, cost-effective alternative. While we routinely employ cryogenic storage of dormant buds of Malus, dormant buds of Vitis generally do not appear to tolerate the desiccation levels required by our current cryopreservation protocol. Since tolerance to desiccation and cold appear to be correlated in Vitis, we tested desiccation tolerance of 60 germplasm accessions selected from the core subset to represent a range of cold hardiness. Budwood was collected in December 1995 in Geneva, stored at –4°C in sealed bags, and systematically desiccated to 30% and 20% moisture. In some treatments, additional desiccation was imposed by slow freezing to –25°C. Microscopic examination of rehydrated buds indicated 60% of accessions tolerated desiccation as low as 20% moisture. Freeze-desiccation at –25°C after desiccation at –4°C neither increased nor decreased viability in these accessions. Only slight modification so current protocols should be necessary for cryopreservation of this class. Of the remaining accessions, 25% tolerated desiccation to 30% moisture, but 15% were intolerant to any desiccation level tested. Techniques must be developed to successfully cryopreserve both these classes of accessions.

Free access

Amy K. Szewc-McFadden, Sharon Bliek, Christopher G. Alpha, Warren F. Lamboy and James R. McFerson

Simple-sequence repeats (SSRs) are efficient and informative DNA markers with great potential for germplasm characterization. When used to characterize large arrays of accessions, such as the core subset of the USDA/ARS Malus collection, SSRs may be more effective than other approaches, such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). For example, SSRs can be PCR-amplified and fluorescence-based detected; they also appear to be abundantly disbursed throughout plant genomes and yield abundant polymorphisms in most taxa studied. We are conducting an extensive screening of a size-fractionated library of Malus ×domestica cv. Golden Delicious to identify and characterize selected SSR loci. We are applying genetic information revealed by SSR loci in combination with passport and horticultural data to better comprehend genetic identity and relatedness in Malus germplasm collections and help develop the Malus core subset. Ultimately, application of molecular marker data will permit improved conservation and use of genetic resources.

Open access

R. Karina Gallardo, Kara Grant, David J. Brown, James R. McFerson, Karen M. Lewis, Todd Einhorn and Mario Miranda Sazo

Advances in precision agriculture technologies provide opportunities to improve the efficiency of agricultural production systems, especially for high-value specialty crops such as fresh apples (Malus domestica). We distributed an online survey to apple growers in Washington, New York, and Michigan to elicit stakeholder perceptions of precision agriculture technologies. Findings from this study demonstrated that growers are willing to adopt precision agriculture technologies when they receive results from applied research projects and are engaged with active extension programs. The availability of customized services and purchasing and rental options may minimize the effects of the economies of size that create barriers to adopting increasing access to technologies. Finally, respondents deemed collaborative efforts between industry and academic institutions crucial for adapting the innovation to better address the needs of growers.

Free access

Stan C. Hokanson, Phil L. Forsline, James R. McFerson, Warren F. Lamboy, Herb S. Aldwinckle and Aimak D. Djangaliev

Malus sieversii, the main progenitor of domesticated apple, is native to areas in Central Asia. To better represent Malus wild germplasm in the USDA–ARS germplasm collections, maintained in Geneva, N.Y., a cooperative project was initiated with the Republic if Kazakhstan to collect and assess that country's wild populations of M. sieversii and to develop more secure in situ reserves to complement ex situ holdings in the United States and Kazakhstan. To date, four exploration trips to the region have included participants from the United States, Kazakhstan, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa. Four Kazkh scientists have toured USDA–ARS sites, exchanged information, and collected germplasm in the United States greenhouse screens of 1600 have revealed potentially new sources of resistance to apple scab, cedar apple rust, and fire blight. An isozyme analysis of maternal half-sib families from four regions suggests the populations of M. sieversii collected represent a single panmictic population, with over 85% of total genetic variation due to differences among families. The most recent collections in 1995 were directed towards more ecologically diverse regions, including a site (Tarbagatai) at the most northern limit for M. sieversii equivalent to northern Minnesota in the United States. Some trees in this region produced fruit nearly 70 mm in diameter with excellent aroma, firmness, and color. This germplasm is being systematically characterized for horticultural traits, pest and disease resistance, and molecular markers.

Free access

Philip L. Forsline, Leigh E. Towill, John W. Waddell, Cecil Stushnoff, Warren F. Lamboy and James R. McFerson

Clonally propagated crops, unlike seed-propagated crops, require intense and costly maintenance, generally in ex situ field gene banks. Consequently, large germplasm collections of tree species especially, are difficult to conserve in a well-replicated fashion and are vulnerable to damage from environmental stresses. Accordingly, long-term storage in liquid nitrogen presents a viable conservation alternative. To assess effectiveness of one approach to cryopreservation, dormant buds from 64 apple (Malus ×domestica Borkh. and other Malus spp.) accessions were collected and preserved in liquid nitrogen using a dormant-vegetative-bud method. Buds were retrieved from liquid nitrogen storage, rehydrated, and grafted onto rootstocks to determine survival. Mean recovery was 76% for 40 cold-hardy accessions, 66% for 20 moderately cold-hardy accessions, and 24% for four cold-tender accessions (range: 16% to 100%). Only four accessions had ≤25% recovery while 54 accessions had ≤50% recovery and 35 accessions had ≤75% recovery. No significant decline in recovery of these accessions by bud grafting occurred after 4 years of liquid nitrogen storage.

Free access

Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James Luby, Alicia Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, David Bedford, Susan Brown, Kate Evans, Cholani Weebadde, Audrey Sebolt and Amy F. Iezzoni

Systematic studies of the relative importance of apple traits for U.S. apple producers to inform U.S. apple breeding programs have been lacking. To fill this gap, a series of audience surveys with instant feedback at five apple producer meetings across the United States was conducted. The traits included in this study were fruit crispness, juiciness, firmness, flavor, soluble solids concentration, sugar–acid balance, shelf life at retail, freedom from storage disorders, host plant disease resistance, and other fruit and tree traits provided by the producer. Producers rated fruit flavor and crispness as the most important traits for a successful apple cultivar. The relative importance assigned to traits was associated with growing location and producers’ years of experience in the decision-making process of managing apple orchards. This study contributes directly to a larger effort that provides breeding programs with systematic knowledge of trait preferences of supply chain members, including producers, and should result in a more targeted approach to developing and commercializing new apple cultivars.

Free access

Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James J. Luby, Alicia L. Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, Nnadozie Oraguzie, Cholani Weebadde, Audrey Sebolt and Amy Iezzoni

Developing new cherry cultivars requires breeders to be aware of existing and emerging needs throughout the supply chain, from producer to consumer. Because breeding programs in perennial crop plants like sweet and tart cherries require both extended time and extensive resources, understanding and targeting priority traits is critical to improve the efficiency of breeding programs. This study investigated the relative importance of fruit and tree traits to sweet and tart cherry producers using ordered probit models. Tart cherry producers considered productivity and fruit firmness to be the most important traits, whereas sweet cherry producers regarded fruit size, fruit flavor, fruit firmness, freedom from pitting, and powdery mildew resistance as important traits. The location of producers’ orchards and their demographic backgrounds influenced their perceptions of the importance of traits. Our findings provide a quantitative basis to reinforce existing priorities of breeding programs or suggest new targets.

Free access

Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James J. Luby, Alicia L. Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, Tom Gradziel, Ksenija Gasic, Gregory L. Reighard, John Clark and Amy Iezzoni

We conducted audience surveys at three major peach producer meetings across the United States. We found that the relative importance assigned to fruit quality and tree traits by producers varied across producers’ end markets. Fresh peach producers indicated fruit flavor and size were the most important fruit quality traits, whereas processed peach producers viewed fruit size, fruit firmness, and absence of split pits as being the most important traits for a successful peach cultivar. These results have potential to ensure that peach breeding programs are consonant with fresh and processed peach producers’ needs for fruit and tree traits.

Free access

Stan C. Hokanson, James R. McFerson, Philip L. Forsline, Warren F. Lamboy, James J. Luby, Aimak D. Djangaliev and Herb S. Aldwinckle

Free access

Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James Luby, Alicia Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, Vance M. Whitaker, Chad E. Finn, James F. Hancock, Cholani Weebadde, Audrey Sebolt and Amy Iezzoni

The primary goal of this research was to evaluate the relative importance of strawberry fruit quality and plant traits to strawberry producers. Previous studies focus on strawberry traits that impact postharvest quality and marketable yield; however, studies emphasizing the importance of these traits to strawberry producers are scarce. To investigate U.S. strawberry producer trait preferences, a series of audience surveys were conducted at four strawberry producer meetings across the United States. Results indicate that fruit firmness, fruit flavor, and fruit shelf life at retail were the most important fruit/plant traits to producers for a successful strawberry cultivar to possess. Growing state and producers’ years involved in the decision-making process of strawberry farms impacted the relative importance of the fruit/plant traits. This study directly contributes to a larger investigation of supply chain members’ trait preferences to improve the efficiency of Rosaceae fruit crop breeding programs and to increase the likelihood of new cultivar adoption. The overall project should result in a more efficient approach to new strawberry cultivar development and commercialization.