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  • Author or Editor: Fumiomi Takeda Takeda x
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Differential thermal analyses (DTA) and freeze viability tests were conducted to investigate the biophysics of freezing in floral buds of `Danka' black (Ribes nigrutn L.) and `Red Lake' red currants [Ribe.s sativum (Rchb.) Syrne] sampled from Nov. 1989 through Mar. 1990. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to determine the relationship between floral morphology and the freezing characteristics of the buds. Floral buds had multiple abrupt low-temperature exotherms (LTEs) and one or two broad LTEs in DTA tests. Abrupt LTEs from DTA were associated with apparent injury to the inflorescence in viability tests. The number of LTEs did not correspond to the number of racemes or flowers per bud, indicating that several flowers froze simultaneously. DTA experiments conducted in Dec. 1990 revealed that the broad exotherm detected between - 14 and - 20C in `Danka' samples resulted from freezing of supercooled water in the outer nonliving region of the periderm of cane tissue attached to the bud.

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Abstract

Axillary buds on lateral branches of ‘Black Satin’ and ‘Hull Thornless’ thornless blackberries (Rubus sp.) were examined from September to May in 1984–1985 and 1986–1987, and in Spring 1988. Initial inflorescence development in ‘Black Satin’ was evident in October; however, most buds remained vegetative until January. Perianth primordia became distinct around the terminal floral apex in some buds in late February to early March. Buds sampled from lateral branches at the top portion of plants were more advanced than buds from the bottom portion at several sampling dates. Axillary buds of ‘Hull Thornless’, in contrast, remained vegetative in all floricane portions until late March. Subsequent developmental rates were rapid and uniform. Once the terminal flower appeared, the most basal floral apex in the primary (A1) axis was next to develop. Remaining floral apices along the axis developed sequentially in an acropetal direction. Neither uniformity and time of bud initiation nor subsequent rate of development appeared to affect the length of bloom period.

Open Access

Three experiments were performed to determine the effect of amending the soil surface layer and mulching with hydrophobic kaolin particle on weeds and blackberry (Rubus subgenus Rubus Watson) plants. In the first study a processed kaolin material (product M-96-018, Engelhard Corporation, Iselin, N.J.), was incorporated in August into the top 3 cm of freshly roto-tilled field that had been in pasture the previous 5 years. The following spring, dry weight of weed vegetation in the control treatment was 219 g·m–2 and was significantly higher (P = 0.05) than the 24 g·m–2 harvested from the treated soil. In two other studies, planting holes for blackberry transplants were either 1) pre- or postplant mulched with a 2- or 4-cm layer of 5% or 10% hydrophobic kaolin in field soil (w/w), or 2) postplant treated with a) napropamide, b) corn gluten meal, c) a product comprised of hydrous kaolin, cotton seed oil, and calcium chloride in water (KOL), d) hand weeded, or e) left untreated. Although untreated plots had 100% weed cover by the end of July, herbicide treatments, 4-cm deposition of hydrophobic kaolin particle/soil mulch, and KOL all suppressed weeds the entire establishment year. Preplant application of hydrophobic kaolin mulch and postplant application of KOL reduced blackberry growth and killed transplants, respectively. In year 2, blackberry plants produced more primocanes that were on average 10-cm taller in weed-free plots (herbicide, 4-cm kaolin soil mulch, and mechanical weeding) than in weedy plots (control and 2-cm kaolin soil mulch). In year 3, yield was significantly lower in control plots (1.5 kg/plant) than in plots that were treated with napropamide and 2- and 4-cm hydrophobic kaolin mulch, or hand weeded during the establishment year (4 kg/plant). The results showed that 4-cm hydrophobic kaolin mulch applied after planting can suppress weeds without affecting blackberry productivity. These kaolin products are excellent additions to the arsenal of tools for managing weeds in horticultural crops.

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`Danka' black currant floral buds produce multiple low temperature exotherms (LTEs). However, the absence of visual injury symbtoms in the buds after exposure to subfreezing temperatures make it difficult to assess injury in these buds. A 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction assay was used to determine whether LTEs corresponded to freezing injury of individual floral primordia or to the entire floral axis. Intact buds were cooled at 3C/n, removed at 3C intervals from -12 to -33C, and thawed on ice for 24 h. Duplicate samples were subjected to differential thermal analysis. Freeze injury Could not be measured with TTC in thawed, intact buds. However, incubation of excised floral primordia in TTC resulted in an all or nothing response. The number of LTES did not correspond to the number of floral primordia killed within a floral bud, but the median LTE did correspond with the temperature at which lethal injury of the whole inflorescence occurred. Therefore, preliminary results indicate that TTC reduction assay of individual floral buds is a fast, reliable technique to assess bud injury.

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Abstract

Movement of 14C-photosynthates in bearing and nonbearing branches of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) was examined during the period of inflorescence bud abscission. Most of the 14C transported from leaves accumulated in developing nuts. Inflorescence buds on defruited trees accumulated twice as much 14C-photosynthate as those on fruiting trees. Inflorescence buds competed poorly against the developing fruit for photosynthate and this might be responsible for inflorescence bud abscission and resultant alternate bearing.

Open Access

The majority of U.S. northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) and southern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum hybrids) for the fresh market is hand harvested because of the high bruising damage to the fruit caused by current machine harvesters. To reduce bruising, it is important to understand how the harvester’s machine parts interact with the fruit. A miniature instrumented sphere, hereafter referred to as Smart Berry, was developed to mimic a blueberry (Vaccinium species and hybrids) fruit and to quantitatively measure mechanical impacts experienced by a real blueberry fruit during mechanical harvesting. The Smart Berry sensor recorded impacts using three single-axis accelerometers with a maximum sampling frequency of 3 kHz and ±500 g n sensing range. Calibration tests showed that the maximum error of the measurement was 0.53% of the output span. The diameter of the sensor (1 inch) was only half of that for the current smallest instrumented sphere on the market. Used together with a close-up video, the fully calibrated sensors were used to identify and measure mechanical impacts occurring in a commercial rotary blueberry harvester. The data suggested that the catch pan created the largest single mechanical impacts. Thus, reducing the drop height or padding the surface could be effective measures to reduce bruising damage caused by the catch pans. The Smart Berry was also used to compare harvesters with two different detaching mechanisms. The rotary detaching mechanism created significantly fewer and lower-magnitude impacts than the slapper mechanism (P ≤ 0.05). Manual drop tests demonstrated that the impact data recorded by the Smart Berry can be correlated with bruising damage experienced by blueberry fruit. Taken together, the data can be used to improve the design of the current machine harvesters for reduction of bruising damage to blueberry fruit destined for the fresh market, and potentially lead to enhanced highbush blueberry production efficiency in the long run.

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Abstract

We found in light and scanning electron microscopic studies of buds of the pistillate ‘Kerman’ pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) that about 12 months elapsed from the time of inflorescence differentiation until the opening of individual flowers. Growth of the rachis and its lateral branches occurred from April to June; sepal differentiation, from late May to mid June; pistil initiation, from early October to March; and carpel development, from late March to early April. Cessation of the development of the inflorescence buds during July, August, and early September appears to be unrelated to nut growth and development, as buds were inactive during that period in both bearing and nonbearing trees.

Open Access

`Chandler' strawberry plants were propagated in tissue culture and grown from April to August in a protected environment to produce stolons. July-harvested daughter plants were stuck in cell packs with rooting media and placed under mist sprinklers, or cold stored at 2 °C for 42 days. Among the July transplants, some were kept in the greenhouse until field planting (14 Sept.) and others were moved into a cold room on 14 August. Daughter plant size and position on the stolon affected rooting and quality of transplants. July-harvested daughter plants that were plugged and misted after being cold stored for 42 days developed fewer roots than daughter plants plugged immediately after detaching from mother plants in July or August. In the field, transplants produced from daughter plants harvested in July and cold stored for 42 days developed more stolons than transplants from July- and August-harvested daughters that were not exposed to cold storage treatments. Larger daughter plants produced more branch crowns than did smaller daughter plants during the fall. All transplants from daughter plants harvested in July and propagated without cold treatment bloomed by November. Fruit production ranged from 521 to 703 g per plant. `Chandler' plants from daughter plants that weighed 10 g produced 10% greater yield than those that weighed <1.0 g. Plants generated from daughter plants plugged in July produced 26% more fruit than those plants plugged in August. Greenhouse soilless systems can be used to grow `Chandler' mother plants for generating runner tips and transplants for the annual plasticulture in colder climates. `Chandler' plants produced in July can yield a late fall crop under high tunnels and more fruit in the spring than August-plugged transplants

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A study was conducted to characterize vegetative growth of mature 'Chester Thornless' blackberry plants trained to the rotatable cross-arm (RCA) trellis in which up to six primocanes were retained. Cane emergence occurred from mid-April to late-May. The first (oldest) primocane attained a sufficient height to be trained in early May in 40% of plants, but younger primocanes could not be trained until late July. However, only 94%, 73%, 60%, and 42% of plants developed three, four, five, and six primocanes, respectively. In primocanes that were trained from 14 May to 3 June, eight or nine medium (0.7-1.3 m) to long (>1.3 m) lateral branches developed. Primocanes tied from 4 June to 16 July averaged less than six lateral branches that were mostly of medium and short (<0.7 m) categories. Primocanes trained after 16 July produced only two short lateral branches. The results indicated that training primocanes from mid-May to mid-June for 'Chester Thornless' blackberry on the RCA trellis would be advantageous to minimize labor costs.

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