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  • Author or Editor: Doyle A. Smittle x
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An irrigation scheduling model for snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was developed and validated. The irrigation scheduling model is represented by the equation: 12.7(i - 4) × 0.5ASW = Di-1 + [E(0.31 + 0.01i) - P - I]i, where crop age is i; effective root depth is 12.7(i - 4) with a maximum of 400 mm; usable water (cm3·cm-3 of soil) is 0.5 ASW, deficit on the previous day is Di-1; evapotranspiration is pan evaporation (E) times 0.31 + 0.01i; rainfall (mm) is P, and irrigation (mm) is I. The model was validated using a line source irrigation system with irrigation depths ranging from 3% to 145% of tbe model rate in 1985 and from 4% to 180% of the model rate in 1986. Nitrogen fertilization rates ranged from 50% to 150% of the recommended rate both years. Marketable pod yields increased as irrigation rate increased in 1985. Irrigation at 4%, 44%, 65%, 80%, 150%, and 180% of the model rate produced yields that were 4%, 39%, 71%, 85%, 92%, and 55% as great as yields with the model rate in 1986. Marketable pod yields increased as N rate increased when irrigation was applied at 80%, 100%, or 150% of the model rate in 1986, but pod yields varied less with N rate when irrigation was applied at 4%, 44%, 65%, or 180% of the model.

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Responses of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L>) Lam) to irrigation rates were evaluated under line-source irrigation systems on Tifton loamy sand soil in Georgia and on a Bude silt loam soil in Mississippi. Total water (rainfall plus irrigation) rates ranged from about 55% to 160% of pan evaporation (Epan). Marketable yields increased with irrigation rate until total water was about 75% of Epan then decreased rapidly with greater irrigation rates. Sweet potato yields were more sensitive to excessive water rates when grown on a silt loam than on a sandy loam soil. Storage loss and quality of cooked 'Jewel' sweet potato roots also increased as the irrigation rate increased until total water was 75% to 95% of Epan then decreased rapidly at water rates of 135 to 160% of Epan.

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A line-source irrigation design was used to provide continuously increasing amounts of irrigation at each application to sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam]. Marketable yields increased with applied irrigation amounts until a total water application of 76% of pan evaporation (Epan) was reached and then decreased rapidly with applied irrigation amounts. Weight loss and decay of roots during storage showed quadratic responses to irrigation amounts and were minimal at the irrigation level of maximum yields. Contents of dextrins and maltose increased with irrigation amounts. Glucose content was maximum at a total water amount of 94% Epan and fructose content decreased with increased amounts of irrigation. Sensory ratings for appearance, flavor, texture, and preference, and objective color measurements of cooked flesh also reached their highest values near the irrigation amount of maximum yield.

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The effect of irrigation scheduling method (variable crop factor, 1; constant crop factor, 2; empirical, 3), soil water tension (25, 50, 75kPa SWT), tillage (disc arrow, DA, moldboard plow, MP) and planting dates (PD) on total irrigation (TI), number of irrigations (NI), useful (UR) and lost rainfall (LR) was studied using a Pascal program that simulated water budgets of 720 crops of snap bean over 10 years. NI and TI were significantly (p<0.01) lower with met.1. Met.3 had the lowest LR and highest UR, but did not allow the complete calculation of the water balance. TI was significantly higher at 25kPa. MP tillage requested fewer NI and less TI, had lower LR and higher UR. Early PD requested fewer NI and TI, and had higher LR. Hence, when water supply was not limiting and weather data were available, a combination of Met.1, MP at any PD provided a continuous supply of water to the crop while controlling water deficit.

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A TurboPascal computer program was developed to calculate daily water budgets and schedule irrigations. Daily water use (di) is calculated as pan evaporation (Ep) times a crop factor (CFi), where i is crop age. The water balance uses a dynamic rooting depth, the soil water holding capacity (SWC) and rainfall data (Ri). di is added to the cumulative water use (Di-1) and Ri is subtracted from Di. An irrigation in the amount of Di is recommended when Di approximates allowable water use. The program cart be adapted to most crop and soil types, and can be used for on-time irrigation scheduling or for simulating water application using past or projected weather data. This program should increase the acceptance of modem scheduling irrigation techniques by farmers and consultants. Additionally, this program may have application in an overall water management programs for farms, watersheds or other areas where water management is required.

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Turnip (Brassica rapa L.) and mustard (Brassica juncea L.) were grown in drainage lysimeters under controlled soil water regimes during 2 years. Irrigation regimes consisted of water applications when the soil water tension at a 10-cm depth exceeded 25,50, or 75 kPa throughout growth of the two crops on two soil types during spring and fall production seasons. Leaf yield and water use were highest when irrigation was applied at 25 kPa soil water tension. Regression equations are presented to describe the relationships of daily pan evaporation and water use to plant age, and to compute daily evapotranspiration: pan evaporation ratios (crop factors) during spring and fall production seasons.

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