Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 34 items for

  • Author or Editor: C.A. Clark x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

C. D. Stanley, G. A. Clark, E. E. Albregts and F. S Zazueta

Sixteen field-located drainage lysimeters (each 60 cm wide, 2.44 m long, 60 cm deep) designed specifically for determination of water requirements for fruiting strawberry production (season - Oct to April) were installed in 1986. Each lysimeter was equipped with individual micro-irrigation and drainage collection systems automated for minimal management input. Initially, computer control (using a low-cost microcomputer) was used to continuously check switching-tensiometers located in each lysimeter and apply irrigation water as needed, A drainage suction (-10 MPa) was applied continuously to simulate field drainage conditions. Manually-installed lysimeter covers were used to protect the plots from interference from rainfall when needed, Initial irrigation application treatments were set at four levels of soil moisture tension controlled by tensiometers and were measured using flow meters for each lysimeter. This paper will discuss problems that were experienced with the initial setup (difficulty in measuring actual application amounts, tensiometer and computer control, elimination of rainfall interference, uniformity of irrigation application, and salinity in the rooting zone) and the modifications (pressurized reservoir tanks, construction of motorized rain-out shelter, micro-irrigation emitters used, and fertilization program) which have been made to overcome them,

Free access

Don R. La Bonte, Christopher A. Clark, Tara P. Smith, Arthur Q. Villordon and C. Scott Stoddard

Free access

D.G. Clark, C. Dervinis, T.A. Nell and J.E. Barrett

In this study, the temporal and spatial regulation of putative ethylene receptor genes was examined during ethylene and pollination-induced flower petal abscission of zonal geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum L.H. Bailey). We used the Arabidopsis thaliana ETR1 gene as a heterologous probe to isolate two full-length cDNA clones, GER1 and GER2, from an ethylene-treated geranium pistil cDNA library. Both cDNAs share a high degree of DNA sequence similarity to ETR1, and examinations of deduced amino acid sequences indicate that the proteins encoded by each gene have the conserved ethylene binding and response regulator domains found in ETR1. Experiments focused on determining the temporal regulation of these genes revealed that both genes are expressed in geranium florets much earlier than when the florets become responsive to ethylene treatment, which is sufficient to cause petal abscission in 1 hr. Both genes are expressed in pistils throughout floret development. Experiments focused on determining the spatial regulation of these genes revealed that both genes are expressed at moderate levels in leaves, pistils, anthers, and petals, and are expressed at very low levels in roots. Preliminary evidence suggests that GER2 is transcriptionally regulated by ethylene in pistils after exogenous ethylene treatment. Currently, the transcriptional regulation of these genes in pistils after pollination is unknown.

Free access

J.E. Barrett, C.E. Wieland, T.A. Nell and D.G. Clark

In some species of bedding plants, rapid hypocotyl elongation during germination makes size control in plug production difficult. Commercial growers often start applying growth regulators as cotyledons are expanding or after the first true-leaves are expanding. Using `Bonanza Spry' marigolds, we evaluated applying paclobutrazol at sowing and after 3 and 6 days. Sprays at 30 mg·L–1 in a volume of 0.2 L·m–2 or 3 mg·L–1 in 0.6 mg·L–1 applied at sowing reduced hypocotyl elongation by 25% and produced more compact plugs. In a second study, plugs of `Double Madness Rose' petunia, `Showstopper Orange' impatiens, `Wizard Rose' coleus, and `Cooler Rose' vinca were grown in 10-cm pots with a growing medium that did not contain pine bark. Uniconazole was sprayed in a volume of 0.2 L·m–2 onto the surface of the medium before planting at concentrations of 25%, 50%, and 100% of the label's recommended concentration for each crop. An additional treatment was uniconazol applied 2 weeks after planting at the label concentration. All early applications reduced final plant size compared to the nonsprayed plants. For impatiens, the early application at 25% of the label concentration produced plants similar to the spray at 2 weeks after planting. For the other crops, the 50% treatment prodcued plants similar to the spray after planting. The early applicaiton of growth regulators offers the industry an additional stradagy to use for controlling the growth of vigorous bedding plant crops.

Free access

Don R. La Bonte, Christopher A. Clark, Tara P. Smith, Arthur Q. Villordon and C. Scott Stoddard

Free access

A.Q. Villordon, J.M. Cannon, H.L. Carroll, J.W. Franklin, C.A. Clark and D.R. LaBonte

Yield tests and evaluation of selected storage root and vine characters were conducted among 12 `Beauregard' sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] mericlones. Maximum yield differences were 43%, 48%, 79%, and 40% for U.S. #1, canners, jumbos, and total marketable yield, respectively. Additive main effect and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) biplot analysis was useful in graphically presenting the yield differences and stability patterns of mericlones. Differences were also detected in vine length, internode diameter, and internode length. Digital image analysis of U.S. #1 storage roots also revealed differences in storage root minor axis length, roundness, and elongation attributes. The results provide valuable information for enhancing current methods of evaluation and selection of mericlones for inclusion in sweetpotato foundation seed programs.

Free access

L.H. Rolston, D.R. La Bonte, W.A. Mulkey, C.A. Clark, J.M. Cannons and P.W. Wilson

Free access

L.H. Rolston, D.R. La Bonte, W.A. Mulkey, C.A. Clark, J.M. Cannon and P.W. Wilson

Free access

D.R. La Bonte, W.A. Mulkey, C.A. Clark, L.H. Rolston, J.M. Cannon, P.W. Wilson and P.C. St. Amand

Full access

D. La Bonte, C. Clark, M. Hoy, A. Villordon, J. Cannon, M. Sistrunk, E. Freeman and G. Roberts

The yield of three generations of virus-tested plants of `Beauregard' sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) was assessed in Louisiana over a 4-year period in 15 yield trials. Treatments included virus-infected foundation `Beauregard', virus-tested `Beauregard' mericlone, B-63 [generation 1 (G-1)], and three generations of B-63 (G-2, G-3 and G-4). Generations refer to the number of continuous years virus-tested plants are grown in the field. Use of G-2 virus-tested `Beauregard' transplants increased yields of U.S. no. 1 grade roots by 16% in comparison with virus-infected, foundation `Beauregard'. Total marketable yield was also higher (11%) using B-63 G-2 transplants in comparison to virus-infected, foundation `Beauregard'. Use of B-63 (G-1), G-3 and G-4 generation transplants did not increase yields in any grade in comparison to virus-infected, foundation `Beauregard' by planting plots amidst virus-infested sweetpotato fields. Generation one B-63 transplants were greenhouse grown and often appeared less robust after planting. Yet we were unable to show significant yield differences between greenhouse derived B-63 (G-1) and field-grown B-63 (G-1) in separate tests; other factors may be involved.