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  • Author or Editor: A. Berry x
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Abstract

Stability and variation of fruit yield, soluble solids, and citric acid content of eight tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivars over 6 years were investigated. The cultivar Ohio 7814 exhibited above-average yield and yield stability. The cultivars showed a wide range of variation for percent soluble solids and citric acid. The cultivar Ohio 7870 was least variable in soluble solids, and ‘Heinz 2653’ most variable. Regarding citric acid, ‘Heinz 722’ had the largest seasonal variation, whereas ‘Ohio 7814’ had the least. A linear relationship between fruit yield and percent soluble solids was not detected on the basis of 6 years of data.

Open Access

Abstract

The Growth Chamber Committee of the Society held a workshop on August 13, 1976 at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana at the annual meeting on Contaminants in Growth Chambers. Observations and comments presented at the discussion are summarized in this report.

Open Access

Datil hot pepper (Capsicum chinense) has potential for increased production due to its unique, spicy flavor and aroma. However, few reports have been published related to postharvest handling characteristics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of harvest maturity on fruit quality under simulated commercial storage conditions. ‘Wanda’ datil pepper plants were grown hydroponically under protected culture. Fruit were harvested at yellow and orange maturity stages, placed in vented clamshell containers, and stored at 2, 7, or 10 °C for 21 days. Peppers harvested at yellow stage maintained greater quality than orange peppers during storage at all temperatures. Marketable fruit after 21 days for peppers harvested at the yellow stage was 94% (2 °C), 88% (7 °C), and 91% (10 °C); that for orange-stage peppers was 68%, 74%, and 82% for the same respective temperatures. No chilling injury (CI) symptoms were observed in these tests. Initial pepper moisture content was 90%, decreasing only slightly during 21 days of storage; weight loss ranged from 2% to 8%. Soluble solids content (SSC) was greater for peppers harvested at the orange stage (9.5%) than for those at yellow stage (7.8%). Neither harvest maturity nor storage temperature affected total titratable acidity (TTA; 0.13%) or pH (5.3). Respiration rate varied with temperature but not by harvest maturity and ranged from 12 to 25 mg·kg−1 per hour after 8 days of storage. Peppers harvested orange contained double the amount of total carotenoids as yellow fruit. Carotenoid content for yellow and orange peppers was 58 and 122 µg·g−1, respectively. Capsaicinoid content ranged from 1810 to 4440 µg·g−1 and was slightly greater for orange-harvested peppers. Datil peppers harvested at the yellow stage and stored in vented clamshell containers had better quality than peppers harvested at the orange stage after 21 days at 2 °C.

Open Access

Abstract

Radiation measurements with different types of meters in several controlled environment facilities have been compiled to demonstrate the problems associated with insuring uniform radiation levels in separate faciities. Data are provided for a quantum meter, three photometers, a pyranometer and a far-red energy meter. Significant variations in total radiant energy in chambers under similar photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) levels were demonstrated. Measurement of light under cool white fluorescent and incandescent lighting with calibrated photometers from different manufacturers, varied by 20%. Greater variation occurred when photometer measurements were compared under different types of lamps. One of the most significant variations in different chambers was the intensity of incandescent radiation. This could only be effectively monitored and controlled with the far-red sensor. Factors are given for conversion between quantum, photometric and radiometric measurements, but high precision cannot be assumed in the use of these factors because of the differences in instrument sensitivity and variations in spectral output of lamps. The study documents the need for calibration of instruments under the same type of light source that is utilized in the growth chambers and for the use of more than one type of sensing instrument to quantify the radiation that controls plant growth.

Open Access