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  • Author or Editor: W. F. Campbell x
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Abstract

Abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism of 6-week-old seedlings of cool- and warm-season crops was determined after a 24-hr exposure to supra- and sub-optimal temperatures. Plants were grown at 25°C and then exposed to 10, 25, or 40°C. After a 24-hr exposure, free (FABA) and hydrolyzable (HABA) abscisic acid and dihydrophaseic acid (DPA) were measured in the plant tops by gas chromatography. Warm-season crops, exposed to 10°C exhibited elevated levels of FABA, HABA and DP A compared to those plants exposed to 25 or 40°C. Among cool-season crops, only peas had higher FABA and HABA levels at 40°C than at 10 or 25°C, while beets had lower levels of HABA at 25°C than at 10 or 40°C. DPA existed at much higher concentrations than FABA and HABA in all plants. The increases in ABA and DPA in warm-season crops exposed to 10°C are attributed to low temperature stress.

Open Access

Abstract

Measurable differences in length, width, and depth of seeds of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), from normal and flat-podded “rogues” were observed. Selective milling removed more than half of the seeds that would have given rise to flat pods, resulting in faster and easier field roguing in subsequent crops. The method is suitable only for stock seed purification because of the high loss (60 to 90%) of normal seeds.

Open Access

Abstract

Effects of boric, indole-3-acetic, gibberellic, succinic and fumaric acids, and water extract from onion bulbs on onion pollen germination and tube growth were studied. Boric acid stimulated pollen germination and tube growth at 100 mg/liter but was toxic at 200 mg/liter. Indole-3-acetic acid slightly increased pollen germination and tube elongation at 0.05 mg/liter, but inhibited pollen tube growth at 200 mg/liter. Gibberellic acid not only enhanced germination percentage, but the higher concentrations also increased the pollen tube lengths. Succinic and fumaric acids stimulated germination, but pollen tubes burst at the higher concentrations. At 200 mg/liter of fumaric acid no germination of pollen grains was observed, but with 25 ml of bulb extract in the culture medium, germination and tube growth were stimulated. Pollen tubes developed abnormally at higher concentrations.

Open Access

Abstract

Freshly dehisced pollen of Allium cepa L. was stored under various conditions of temperature and relative humidity for up to 198 days. One series of treatments was freeze dried before storage. The degree of viability was determined by germination percentages at periodic intervals. Germination of approximately 60% of the initial germination was maintained in pollen samples freeze dried and stored at −18° and 5% relative humidity. Without freeze drying, approximately 38% of initial germination was maintained in samples of onion pollen stored 198 days at −18° and 10% relative humidity. Pollen stored at −18° and 80% relative humidity germinated 34% of initial germination after 56 days of storage and gradually declined to 4% by 170 days.

Open Access

Abstract

The effect of imbibition and drying rates on colyledon cracking in snap beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L., was studied. Six snap bean cultivars, representing various degrees of susceptibility to cotyledon cracking, were compared. Data indicated that differences in the rate of imbibition and drying were not responsible for differences in susceptibility to cotyledon cracking. The crack-resistant ‘Improved Higrade’ and moderately-resistant ‘Earliwax’ imbibed water faster than the crack-susceptible cultivars. Anatomical studies indicated that cracking was more frequent across the cell walls of the cotyledon cells than along the middle lamellae in all cultivars.

Open Access

Abstract

The firmness, pericarp color, total pectins, total sugars, free reducing sugars, pH, titratable acidity, organic acids, amino acids, and tannins were analyzed in apricots, Prunus armeniaca L. cvs. Moorpark and Large Early Montgamet and in peaches, Prunus persica L. cv. Elberta. Fruit was stored under varying CO2 concentrations and 5.0% 02. Results of these treatments were compared to those obtained with conventional refrigerated storage fruit.

The data indicated that firmness, total pectins, titratable acidity, total sugars, and tannins decreased with duration of storage time. However, they usually decreased at a slower rate in CA-stored fruit than in refrigerator-stored fruit. Color, pH, and free reducing sugars increased with storage time, but the organic and amino acids content varied erratically with the treatment and length of storage time. The organic acids were generally depleted as storage was extended. Succinic acid occurred only under elevated CO2 concns. increasing the CO2 accelerated accumulation of succinic acid and the depletion of malic acid. Increased CO2 caused alanine to accumulate and aspartic acid to decrease.

Apricot fruit appeared to benefit most when stored in 2.5% CO2. Under this CO2 cone, fruit did not develop detrimental effects as rapidly as at other concns. of CO2 tested. Peach fruit did not appear to be satisfactorily stored under the conditions of this experiment.

Open Access

Abstract

Electron micrographs of ‘Gleason Elberta’ peach flower buds, Prunus persica (L.). Stobes, during rest indicated only moderate metabolic activity prior to December 20. In the December 27 collection, however, a single membrane-bound body (microbody or lysosome) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were present. Also, the Golgi bodies (dictyosomes) were nearly mature. Heterochromatin disappeared on January 3. By the end of February the number of mitochondria, Golgi bodies, and vesicles had increased markedly. During the first week of March, large nucleopores were observed in the nucleus. These data indicated that bud cells were changing at cold temperatures during winter. Organellar changes were compared to the predicted date for end of rest (13).

Open Access

Abstract

Menazon (S-(4,6 diamino-s-triazin-2-methyl) o,o-dimethyl phosphorodithioate) an organophosphate insecticide, and usnic acid, an allergen present in lichens, inhibited germination of mung bean (Phaseolus mungo L.). On the third day of germination, cotyledons were examined histochemically and ultrastructurally and the resultant photomicrographs showed abundant starch grains and protein bodies in the treated seeds compared to the controls. Electron microscopic examination showed extensive endoplasmic reticulum and ribosomes along with vacuoles and normal mitochondria in control tissue. In contrast, the presence of protein bodies and disruption of the cytoplasmic organization were conspicuous in the menazon- and usnic acid-treated mung beans. This suggests impaired utilization of food reserves during germination.

Open Access

Abstract

Labeled 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-DCPE) (5.90 × 10−7 moles/ml) or 3-chloroallyl alcohol (3-CAA) (6.12 × 10−7 moles/ml) was administered to tomato seedlings through the roots. Radioactivity in various fractions was determined at various intervals of time. Maximum amounts of 1,3-DCPE and 3-CAA had been absorbed and translocated to the aerial parts of the plants by 4 hr. Gas chromatographic analysis of plant materials showed that the compounds were readily metabolized by the plant. The 1,3-DCPE was metabolized to 3-CAA, part of which was converted to 3-chloroacrylic acid and 3-chloro-1-propanol as confirmed by co-chromatography with standard compounds. No parent 1,3-DCPE was found in the plant after a 72-hr incubation period and 3-CAA was not detected after a 96-hr incubation. In unlabeled experiments, micrographs of cells from control plants showed normal organellar structure. By contrast, the chloroplasts in some leaf cells from plants treated with 3-CAA had undergone slight swelling and partial disruption of the membrane system 6 hr after treatment. At 12 and 24 hr after treatment, both chemicals had disrupted the organellar structure of the chloroplasts and the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) of some cells. Although the normal organellar structure was disrupted, the data indicate that the dichloropropenes and 3-CAA do not present plant residue problems, and that concern about the ultimate environmental fate of these compounds may be minimal.

Open Access

Abstract

Two species of Zinnia (Z. elegans Jacq. 2n = 24 and 4n = 48; and Z. peruviana (L.) L. 2n = 24) were utilized in a series of crosses in an attempt to develop new types of Zinnia. Embryos were apparently normal and increased in size during the early stages of development, however, during the second week after pollination there was a breakdown of the endosperm cells followed shortly by degeneration of the embryos. By using IAA and embryo culture techniques, mature F1 plants were produced. The F1 hybrids, which resembled Z. elegans more than Z. peruviana, were more vigorous than either parent. They were sterile.

Open Access