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  • Author or Editor: T. W. Young x
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Abstract

‘Christian Dior’ and ‘Happiness’ roses on Rosa fortuniana stock, fertilized with 3 rates each of N, P, and K factorially combined, were grown for 3 years at Ft. Pierce, Florida. All fertilizer was applied at the beginning of the experiment under plastic mulch just before the bushes were planted. About 2300 lb./A of N on ‘Christian Dior’ and 2100 lb. on ‘Happiness’ produced the greatest number of flowers. Leaf N at 18 months was also maximized by 2100 lb. N. Nitrogen levels maximizing stem lengths were slightly lower. The independent effects of P were minor and low levels best, perhaps because residual soil P at start of the study was adequate. Flower production decreased with K fertilization beyond low rates, whereas stem lengths increased to a max at about 1700 lb./A. At times, various nutrient interactions were noted. ‘Christian Dior’ consistently yielded more flowers than ‘Happiness’. With minor exceptions, ‘Happiness’ had longer stems.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Majestic’ peach {Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) was released by the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station to provide a large, excellent quality freestone fruit in the ripening sequence between ‘Harvester’ and ‘Red Globe’ or from June 22 to July 1 in north Louisiana (1).

Open Access

Abstract

Shading of nectarine [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] scaffold limbs 45-58 days after full bloom caused seed discoloration and fruit abscission. Shading of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] scaffold limbs from 31-41 days after full bloom caused greater fruit adscisson than shading from 11-21 or 21-31 days after bloom. The photosynthetic inhibitor, 3-tert-butyl-5-chloro-6-methyluracil (terbacil), applied to whole trees 35 days after full bloom induced fruit abscission. Terbacil at 500 ppm or higher caused excessive thinning. Fruit size was larger than hand thinned fruit, since overthinning occurred. Fruit color, soluble solids, and firmness of fruit from the 500 ppm treated trees were similar to fruit from hand thinned trees. No leaves abscissed, but marginal chlorosis occurred on less than 30% of the leaves at harvest. Flower bud numbers per cm of terminal length were similar to the hand thinned trees, but much greater than unthinned trees. Residue analysis of fruit at harvest from the 500 ppm terbacil treatment revealed 0.07 ppm in the fruit.

Open Access

Abstract

Results are presented for performance of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] clones at six established National Pecan Advanced Clone Testing System (NPACTS) sites for 16 nut quality factors from 1980 through 1985. Total nut weight and percent kernel were significantly greater at Tulare, Calif. than at any other location, with ≈80% of the clones averaging 6.5 g/nut or more and ≈90% averaging at least 54.5% kernel. Nut weight was smallest at El Paso, Texas. Daily mean temperatures during nut expansion may be a major factor determining nut weight response. Low nut density was characteristic of more clones at Baton Rouge, La. than at any other location. Kernel color was lightest at El Paso and darkest at Baton Rouge, with darker color appearing to be related to high field moisture conditions before harvest. Nut weight was not related to kernel percentage, color, or percent kernel covered with fuzz (packing material); thus, large nuts are not necessarily of lower quality and can be selected in an effective breeding program. Amount of nut “packing material” retained in the sutures of kernel halves after shelling was generally not related to other traits, except that material retained in ventral grooves increased with nut and kernel weight. Depth and width of dorsal grooves were not related to retention of packing material and can be disregarded in future pecan nut evaluation systems. Many other expected character relationships were verified and the overall NPACTS nut evaluation system will be revised based on these results.

Open Access

Abstract

‘La Festival’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released to provide a yellow flesh cultivar with a good quality fruit requiring 400 to 500 hr chilling. ‘La Festival’ produces a heavy crop of medium to large freestone fruit that ripen about 25 June, or about 20 days before ‘Elberta’ in southern Louisinna

Open Access

Abstract

‘La Pecher’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released to provide a good quality yellow flesh cultivar with a 400 to 500 hr chilling requirement. ‘La Pecher’ produces a heavy crop of medium to large semifreestone fruit that ripen 39 days before ‘Elberta’ or about 6 June in southern Louisiana.

Open Access

Abstract

‘La White’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released to provide a 600-700 hr chilling requirement, low acid, white flesh cultivar adapted to conditions in southeastern Louisiana. ‘La White’ produces a heavy crop of medium to large semi-freestone fruit that ripen 27 days before ‘Elberta’ or about 18 June in southeastern Louisiana.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Idlewild’ peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released by the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station to provide a 500- to 600-hr chilling-requirement cultivar which produces a good quality fruit. ‘Idlewild’ produces a heavy crop of medium to large semi-freestone fruit that ripen 36 days before ‘Elberta’ or about June 9 in southeastern Louisiana. ‘Idlewild’ has exhibited good resistance to bacterial leaf spot [Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni (Smith 1903) Dye 1978] when grown under southeastern Louisiana conditions.

Open Access