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  • Author or Editor: Jayne Zajicek x
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Placing the horticulture student on a path of professional development as a society-ready graduate for the 21st century takes more than technical knowledge. New types of team-oriented organizations are being created that were not even imagined a few years ago. To help empower students to survive in these organizations, the course “Leadership Perspectives in Horticulture” was created. This interdisciplinary course serves as a model for leadership skill instruction by incorporating the component of leadership development into a technical horticulture course. The objectives of this course are to provide academic and historical perspectives in technical horticulture issues, develop skills in leadership, problem solving, and team building, complete a theoretical study of specific leadership models, and blend theoretical leadership models with horticulture issues by completing a problem solving experience. An overview of the course in addition to changes in leadership behavior of students will be discussed.

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The goal of this study was to assess changes in the life skill development of elementary school students participating in a 1-year school garden program. The Life Skills Inventory included statements for six constructs of life skills including teamwork, self-understanding, leadership, decision making skills, communication skills, and volunteerism. The students were divided into two treatment groups, an experimental group that participated in the garden program and a control group that did not participate in the school garden program. Students in the control group had significantly higher overall life skills scores on the pretest compared to students participating in the garden program but the scores were no longer significantly different between the groups on the posttest scores at the end of the program. In addition, there were no significant differences in the control group's pretest scores compared to their posttest scores. However, the students in the experimental group did significantly increase their overall life skills scores by 1.5 points after participating in the garden program. Two internal life skill scales were positively influenced by the garden program; “working with groups” and “self understanding.”

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The performance and satisfaction of students enrolled in a traditionally structured lecture/lab floral design course and a Web-based version of the same course were compared. Students were assigned randomly to course sections by available seating. Data collected included a demographic survey, design and course evaluations, and test grades. Significant differences were noted in class grades, with students in the traditionally taught course outperforming the Web-based students in both lecture and lab grades. Results from a survey instrument designed to determine whether students were suited to the distance learning environment (given only to the Web-based students) indicated a direct correlation between distance preparedness and course grades. A higher level of distance course preparedness correlated with a higher grade in the course. There was also a direct correlation between grades and whether the student was in the course with the delivery method they preferred. Students who were assigned to the course they preferred had significantly higher grades than students who did not. These results indicate that overall, a course such as floral design may be more effectively taught through traditional teaching techniques. However, certain students with adequate computer skills and a preference for Web-based courses may be successful in courses such as floral design.

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Seeds of tickseed (Coreopsis lanceolata L.) and purple coneflower [Echinacea purpureo (L.) Moench] were primed in aerated solutions of a 50 mm potassium phosphate buffer at 16C. C. lanceolata seeds were primed for 3 or 6 days; E. purpurea seeds were primed for 6 or 9 days. Seeds were vacuum-stored for 2 months immediately after priming. Identical treatments were imposed on open-stored seeds just before the termination of the storage duration, thus producing four treatments: a vacuum-stored control, an open-stored control, primed vacuum-stored seed, and seed primed after open storage. Although priming significantly improved the performance of C. lanceolata seed, vacuum storage alone also significantly increased the speed of germination and final germination. The advantage of priming was diminished during 2 months of vacuum storage of E. purpurea, but priming enhanced germination as compared with the open-stored nonprimed control. There was little difference between the performance of E. purpurea seeds both primed and vacuum-stored. and the vacuum-stored control.

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Dyssodia pentacheta, a prostrate-growing perennial Texas wildflower with potential for use in low-maintenance landscapes, was propagated in vitro and by stem cuttings under mist. Optimum rooting for IBA-treated semihardwood terminal stem cuttings (3 to 30 mm IBA) and in vitro-grown nodal segments (30 to 100 mm IBA) occurred after 4 weeks under an intermittent mist system. A 300-mm IBA basal dip was lethal to macroand microcuttings. In vitro, D. pentacheta produced more shoots per nodal explant on Woody Plant Medium (2 g Gelrite/liter) with 1 to 10 μ m BA than with combinations of BA and 0.5 μm NAA. After shoot proliferation, the shoots were subculture twice and grown on growth regulator-free medium. When maintaining D. pentacheta in vitro on media devoid of plant growth regulators, 1% sucrose was more effective than 2% for promoting shoot growth and suppressing apparent production of phenolics. Chemical names used: N-(phenylmethyl) -1H-purin-6-amine (BA); 1H-indole-3-butyric acid (IBA); 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).

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Abstract

Grassland management techniques and dates of seeding for field establishment of 5 species of forbs (wild flowers) were investigated from 1981-1983. Management treatments included burning, mowing, herbicide followed by mowing, and an untreated control. All 3 treatments had no significant affect on seedling establishment. Fall seeding gave best emergence for black samson (Echinacea angustifolia D.C.) and butterfly milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa L.). Spring seeding gave maximum emergence of prairie coneflower [Ratibida pinnata (Venten.)Barhn.] and purple prairieclover [Petalostemum purpureum (Venten.)Rydb.]. Rough gayfeather (Liatris aspera Michx.) displayed low emergence in both spring and fall seeding dates. Stand counts and winter survival responses to seeding dates were similar to emergence response for each species.

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To assess the effects of summer-like [high-temperature long-day (HTLD)] vs. winter-like [low-temperature short-day (LTSD)] growing conditions on production quality and postproduction longevity of potted miniature roses, plants of Rosa L. `Meirutral' and `Meijikatar' were grown in growth chambers using a short-cycle production schedule (potted liners grown until root establishment, pinched, and flowered). Plants grown under the HTLD environment [30C day/21C night plus 725 μmol·m–2·s–1 photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) for 14 hours per day] had more flowering shoots than those grown under the LTSD environment (21C day/16C night plus 725 μmol·m–2·s–1 PPF for 10 hours per day). The difference is attributable to fewer blind shoots (shoots with aborted growing terminals) under HTLD, because plants in both environments had the same total number of shoots at flowering. Plants in the HTLD chamber also flowered faster, were shorter, and had smaller and lighter-colored flowers than plants in the LTSD chamber. In addition, plants under HTLD exhibited greater poststorage floral longevity and whole-plant shelf life than plants grown under LTSD conditions, regardless of cultivar, simulated shipping (storage) treatment (4 days at 16C), or stage of floral development at harvest. These results suggest benefits from summer production of potted miniature rose plants and the possibility of using a higher-temperature forcing regimen than is normally recommended for winter production.

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Seeds of three columbine species, Aquilegia caerulea James, Aquilegia canadensis L., and Aquilegia hinckleyana Munz., were studied to determine if seed priming can be used to enhance or completely bypass stratification. The effect of priming varied among species. Germination percentage of nonstratified, primed seed of A. caerulea was as high as nonprimed stratified seed at the termination of the study. Nonstratified primed seeds of A. canadensis did not perform as well as stratified seed, but priming did enhance the germination percentage of stratified seed. Priming had no effect on seed germination–of A. hinckleyana.

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Landscape plantings have been designed traditionally using aesthetic criteria with minimal consideration given to water requirements. The primary objective of this research was to develop quantitative information on water use of plant communities conventionally used in urban landscapes. Pots of Photinia × Fraseri (photinia Fraseri), Lagerstroemia indica 'Carolina Beauty' (crape myrtle), or Ligustrum japonicum (wax leaf ligustrum) were transplanted from 3.8 l into 75.7 l pots with either Stenotaphrum secundatum 'Texas Common' (St. Augustinegrass), Cynodon dactylon × C. transvallensis 'Tiffway' (bermudagrass), Trachelospermum asiaticum (Asiatic jasmine), or left with bare soil. Whole community water use was measured gravimetrically. In addition, sap flow rates were recorded for shrub species with stem flow gauges. Sap flow measurements were correlated to whole community water use recorded during the same time intervals. Whole community water use differed due to the groundcover component; bermudagrass, Asiatic jasmine, and bare soil communities used less water than St. Augustinegrass communities. Differences were also noted in stomatal conductance and leaf water potential among the species.

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Plant identification is a prerequisite to many, if not all, horticulturally related classes. It typically has been taught through the use of live specimens, slides, and text books. Recently, computers have entered the picture as a possible tool to teach plant identification. Increased availability and sophistication of computer systems in the college setting have led to the increased use of computers in instruction.

The objective of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between a student's learning style and academic achievement following computer assisted instruction. Undergraduate students enrolled in a plant identification class were involved in the study. Students learned plant identification either by: 1) viewing live specimens, 2) utilizing a computer instruction database system, or 3) combining live specimens with computer instruction. The students' cognitive knowledge was evaluated with pre and post tests. Learning style and attitude toward computer assisted instruction were also obtained.

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