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  • Author or Editor: James E. Simon x
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The spatial distribution patterns of five melon cultivars (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus) were evaluated by measuring XY coordinates of ripe fruit locations in the field. Fruit ripeness distribution over time was also evaluated for three cultivars by measuring the number of ripe fruit, fruit mass, and location over time. Spatial distribution curves for distances between fruit clusters and individual fruit from cluster centroids varied between clusters and were derived for each cultivar from the best fit curves based on chi-square analysis from the two-dimensional spatial fruit distribution. These equations can be used for predicting actual fruit locations in the field. Ripeness distribution patterns indicated that, while the exact duration of the effective harvesting period is cultivar-dependent, the ripeness trend for each of the cultivars was similar. Spatial distribution patterns vary among melon cultivars and must be recognized in the design of automated harvesting systems.

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Abstract

Somatic embryos of borage (Borago officinalis L., Boraginaceae) were induced directly from immature zygotic embryos and indirectly from callus. Embryogenic callus maintained on liquid basal medium supplemented with 4.5 μm 2,4-D and 10% (v/v) coconut water (CW) produced globular structures that became rhizogenic upon transfer to 2,4-D-free basal medium. Embryogenic callus maintained on semisolid basal medium supplemented with 4.5 μm 2,4-D and 10% CW continued to produce somatic embryos, but development was abnormal. Globular structures often failed to develop cotyledons, and those that developed were small and fused; hypocotyls tended to be large and elongated. Root meristems appeared normal, but shoot meristems were not formed. Carbon source (sucrose, glucose, or maltose) and ABA did not normalize somatic embryogenesis. A highly embryogenic, non-browning clone produced various tissue types when 2,4-D was withdrawn that varied in total fatty acids: white nodular structures (12.6%), cotyledonary structures (22.5%), white callus (5.0%), green leafy growth (3.1%), and translucent globular growth (5.1%). γ-Linolenic acid, as a percentage of total fatty acids, was highest in cotyledonary structures (19.9%) and lowest in white callus (10.2%). Chemical names used: abscisic acid (ABA); 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); coconut water (CW).

Open Access

Abstract

Embryo sac formation in borage (Borago officinalis L.) was of monosporic, Polygonum type. Zygotic embryogenesis resembled the Piperad type (Myosotis Variation) without a suspensor after the four-cell stage with free nuclear endosperm. Cotyledons were initiated 4 days after pollination (DAP) and grew rapidly until 12 to 14 DAP, with seed maturity at 18 DAP. There were two patterns of in vitro somatic embryo development from embryogenic callus: 1) from single cells, which proceeded through typical zygotic embryo stages; or 2) from groups of cells that developed as a meristem. The advanced stages of somatic embryogenesis were characterized by abnormal cotyledon and hypocotyl morphology and incomplete apical development.

Open Access

Abstract

In vitro shoot proliferation of borage (Borago officinalis L.) was achieved in a basal medium based on Murashige and Skoog salts supplemented with 17.6 μm BA (4 mg·liter−1) plus 10% (v/v) coconut water. Rooting of in vitro-produced shoots occurred in basal media and increased in response to the addition of IBA. Rooted shoots were transferred successfully to soil. Immature zygotic embryos cultured in 4.5 μm 2,4-D (1 mg·liter−1) plus coconut water (CW) produce asexual embryos directly from the cotyledonary surface and indirectly from callus. Chemical names used: N-(phenylmethyl)-1H-purin-6-amine (BA); (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D); 1H-indole-3-butanoic acid (IBA).

Open Access

NewCROP (http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop) is a crop resource online program that serves Indiana, the United States, and the world. This crop information system provides useful resources to encourage and assist new rural-based industries and to enhance agricultural sustainability and competitiveness. The NewCROP site currently averages 150,000 hits per month. Indiana CropMAP is the first module in a proposed nationwide, site-specific, retrievable system that will serve the crop information needs of individual growers, marketers, processors, government agencies, cooperative extension personnel, and industry. For each county in Indiana, users can access the most recent US agriculture statistics, county extension offices, lists of crops that are currently grown, recommended alternate crops, and experimental crops. Detailed crop information, much of it specific to Indiana, can be accessed directly or through a crop search. The New Crop Compendium CD-ROM was produced by the Purdue University Center for New Crops and Plant Products in cooperation with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). The New Crop Compendium CD-ROM, a searchable resource of new crop information, was edited by Jules Janick and Anna Whipkey and contains the entire text and figures from the proceedings of the three National New Crop Symposia: J. Janick and J.E. Simon (eds.). 1990. Advances in New Crops. Timber Press, Portland, Ore.; J. Janick and J.E. Simon (eds.). 1993. New Crops. Wiley, New York; and J. Janick (ed.). 1996. Progress in New Crops. ASHS Press, Alexandria, Va. The New Crop Compendium provides a valuable source of information on new, specialty, neglected, and underutilized crops for scientists, growers, marketers, processors, and extension personnel. It employs an intuitive, easy to use interface. Purchase information can be found at the following url: http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/compendium/order.html.

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Hydro-distilled essential oils from fresh and dry leaves and fresh and dry flowers of `Sweet Dani', a new ornamental lemon basil (Ocimum basilicum) cultivar with potential as a source of natural citral, were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The essential oil contents were 0.18%, 0.19%, 0.30%, 0.28% w/w on a fresh weight basis of fresh and dry leaves, and fresh and dry flowers, respectively. Oils from leaves and flowers differed significantly in content and composition. The major constituents in dry leaf oil were neral 21.8% and geranial 33.5%. The major constituents in dry flower oil included: nerol 11.5%, neral 12.9%, geraniol 7.6%, and geranial 17.7%. Nerol (1.6%), and geraniol (0.4%) were very low in dry leaf oil. As citral is a combination of neral and geranial, the relative leaf and flower citral content is 55.3% and 30.6% of the total oil, respectively. Linalool and octanol were detected in flower oils only.

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Parthenolide, a biologically active sesquiterpene lactone found in feverfew [Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Schultz. Bip.], has been indirectly linked to the antimigraine action of feverfew preparations. Commercial products of feverfew leaves vary widely in parthenolide content (0-1.0%/g dwt). No comprehensive studies have quantified parthenolide variation among feverfew populations or cultivars, and whether morphological traits are correlated with this natural product. In this study, 30 feverfew accessions were examined for parthenolide content, morphological traits, and seed origin. Statistically significant differences in parthenolide levels were found among the populations studied. Parthenolide content ranged from (0.012% ± 0.017 to 2.0% ± 0.97 /g dwt) as determined by HPLC-UV-MS. Higher parthenolide levels tended to be in wild material (0.41% ± 0.27) as opposed to cultivated material (0.19% ± 0.09). Parthenolide levels correlated with flower morphology: disc flower (0.49% = B1 0.36), semi-double (0.38% ± 0.13), double (0.29% ± 0.16), and pompon-like flower (0.22 ± 0.14). Leaf color also appeared to be indicative of parthenolide levels, with the light-green/golden leafed accessions showing significantly higher parthenolide content than darker-leafed varieties, but whether this was due to inadvertent original selection of a high parthenolide-containing golden leaf selection is not yet known. This study does show that further selection for improved horticultural attributes and natural product content is promising to improve feverfew lines for the botanical/ medicinal plant industry.

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Abstract

Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) plants were grown, until flower buds became visible, in a peat-lite mix and watered daily with a complete nutrient solution with 10 mm N as either NO 3 or NH 4 + . Ammonium decreased plant height and stem plus petiole dry weight. Leaf blade dry weight was not affected by N form. However, the essential oil content was decreased by 28% with NH 4 + , thereby decreasing the essential oil yield per plant. Although NH 4 + decreased the content (nl·g-1 leaf blade dry weight) of linalool and eugenol, their percentage was not altered. Therefore, the changes in total yield of these individual constituents was simply a reflection of less total extractable essential oil. The total amount of the other major constituents in sweet basil, 1,8-cineole, methyl chavicol, and total sesquiterpenes was not affected significantly. While N form did not alter the percentage of monoterpenes and aromatic polypropa-noides, NH 4 + -N increased the total sesquiterpene percentage. Nitrogen form altered the essential oil content and composition of sweet basil and, therefore, should be considered in nutritional studies with aromatic plants.

Open Access

Plants of rosemary [Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae)] were grown in pots containing a soilless (1 sphagnum peat:1 perlite) or soil-based (1 sphagnum peat: 1 perlite:1 field soil) growing medium and fertilized with either 12N-5.2P-12.5K controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) at 9.0 g/pot; constant liquid fertilization (LF) with 20N4.3P-16.7K at 150 mg N/liter; constant LF at 150 mg N/liter, plus CRF at 4.5 g/pot; weekly LF at 150 mg N/liter; or weekly LF at 150 mg N/liter, plus CRF at 4.5 g/pot. Constant LF plus CRF generally reduced plant height and depressed shoot fresh weight relative to other fertilizer regimes. Essential oil content was highest in plants receiving weekly LF. Plants grown in the soil-based mix were shorter, shoot fresh and dry weight tended to be lower, and essential oil yield was higher when compared to plants grown in the soilless mix. Satisfactory growth was obtained in both media when rosemary plants were fertilized with 12N-5.2P-12.5K CRF at 9.0 g/pot or weekly LF with 20N<.3P-16.7K at 150 mg N/liter.

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Three watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai] cultivars with different ozone (O3) sensitivities were grown in a charcoal-filtered greenhouse and exposed in continuous-stirred tank reactor chambers to five levels (0, 100, 200, 300, or 400 nL·L-1) of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the presence (80 nL·L-1) or absence (0 nL·L-1) of ozone (O3) for 4 hours/day, 5 days/week for 22 days. In the presence of O3, SO2 increased foliar injury in all three cultivars, but the impact was greatest for the most O3-sensitive cultivar, `Sugar Baby,' moderate for `Crimson Sweet,' and least for the least O3-sensitive cultivar, `Charleston Gray.' For all cultivars, SO2 intensified O3 suppression of leaf area for the first seven mainstem leaves and of dry weights for aboveground and total plant tissues. Root dry weight was independently suppressed by both pollutants, and the root: top ratio was linearly suppressed by SO2 alone. Sulfur dioxide combined with O3 can be detrimental to crop species such as watermelon. Thus, the potential for SO2 phytotoxicity should not be summarily dismissed, especially in the vicinity of SO2 point sources where O3 co-occurs.

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