Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 13 of 13 items for

  • Author or Editor: J. W. Buxton x
Clear All Modify Search

A capillary mat-mist system was developed to provide near constant media water contents at differing quantities of mist. Media water contents were reduced by increasing the capillary mat height above a constant water table maintained at bench level. Increased tensions from 0 to 10 cm above the water table reduced water content in Oasis, rockwool, and peat-perlite by 35.4%, 27.6%, and 17.4%, respectively. There was no difference in water content for each medium when the mist quantity ranged between 600 and 1800 mL·m-2·h-1, except when the capillary mat was at 9 cm above the water table and mist volume was 300 mL·m-2·h-1. Chrysanthemum cuttings rooted best when water content was highest regardless of media. Using the peat-perlite medium, water content had the greatest impact on rooting when the mist volume was low (600 mL·m-2·h-1). Relative water content of cuttings was lowest during the first 5 days of sticking and both reduced media water content and mist quantity resulted in the lowest internal water status for the cuttings.

Free access

Abstract

The rhizomes of 3 cultivars of tall bearded irises (Iris spp.)—‘Cayenne Capers’, ‘Babbling Brook’, and ‘Stepping Out’—were stored at 2°C for 9, 14, and 18 weeks and then forced to anthesis in a greenhouse. During vernalization, rhizomes were either planted into pots or placed on cooler shelves. Rhizomes of ‘Cayenne Capers’ required no vernalization to develop the flower bud, yet vernalization was required for ‘Babbling Brook’ and ‘Stepping Out’. The longer the vernalization period, the shorter the time to flower after being removed to the forcing environment. Rhizomes not planted during vernalization required more time to flower than those which were planted.

Open Access

Abstract

The environment created by ventilating a greenhouse with mine-air was suitable for the production of high quality spray chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) and snapdragons (Antirrhinum majus L.) from mid-February through November without any additional energy requirement. The environment created in the greenhouse from December to February was extremely humid and favored botrytis development and physiological problems which reduced crop quality.

Open Access