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  • Author or Editor: Frank A. Blazich x
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Abstract

A histological study of the initiation and development of adventitious roots in lightgrown cuttings of mung bean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) showed that cell divisions leading to adventitious root initiation occurred 20–24 hours after the cuttings were taken. Cell divisions began at the same time for control and naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) treated cuttings indicating that NAA did not alter the timing of root initiation. The root primordia for both were well developed by 48 hours and the roots began to emerge by 72 hours. Intracellular changes in the cells destine for the initial divisions first became visible histologically at 12 hours. By 16 to 20 hours considerable intracellular change was observed, including enlargement of the nuclei and nucleoli and an increase in apparent cytoplasmic staining density.

Open Access

Hedged stock plants of four full-sib families [27-2 × 27-5, 27-3 × 27-1, 27-2 × 27-1, and 27-6 × 27-1 (designated B, G, R, and W)] of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were fertilized daily with a complete nutrient solution containing N at 10, 25, 40, 55, or 70 mg·L–1. In May, terminal softwood stem cuttings were taken and placed under intermittent mist. Families were combined to form composite poor-rooting (BR) and good-rooting (GW) families. At 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks after sticking, cuttings were evaluated for rooting and analyzed for mineral nutrient and carbohydrate content. Percent rooting by week 12 for cuttings from stock plants receiving N between 25 to 70 mg·L–1 was 28% to 33%, whereas significantly fewer (17%) cuttings from plants receiving 10 mg·L–1 had rooted. By week 12, 98% of cuttings taken from stock plants receiving N at 10 mg·L–1 were alive, while significantly fewer (81% and 82%) of the more succulent cuttings receiving 55 and 70 mg·L–1, respectively, had survived. Nearly all increases in cutting height occurred within the first 3 weeks. In contrast, top dry weight increased steadily throughout the experiment. There were no significant differences in rooting between the two composite families until week 12, when 32% of cuttings from family GW had rooted compared with 24% for family BR. Survival of cuttings was greater for the poor-rooting family (BR) (94%) than for the good-rooting family (GW) (82%) after 12 weeks. Levels of total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC) and individual soluble sugars were initially higher in cuttings taken from stock plants that received higher rates of N, whereas the reverse was true for starch content. With the exception of sucrose, content of TNC and soluble carbohydrates generally increased over time. Starch was nearly depleted by week 3, but had increased by weeks 6 and 9. No correlation was found between TNC: N ratios and rooting percentage. Family GW contained greater quantities of myo-inositol, glucose, fructose, sucrose, total soluble carbohydrates (TSC), and TNC than did family BR. Mineral nutrient content was generally greater in cuttings taken from stock plants that received higher rates of N; these cuttings also maintained higher levels throughout the 12-week rooting period. As with the soluble carbohydrates, the good-rooting composite family (GW) contained greater amounts of all mineral nutrients than did the poor-rooting family BR.

Free access

Producing high quality rooted stem cuttings on a large scale requires precise management of the rooting environment. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of the rooting environment on adventitious root formation of stem cuttings of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Hardwood stem cuttings of loblolly pine were collected in Feb. 2002 from hedged stock plants and stored at 4 °C until setting in Apr. 2002. One hundred stem cuttings per plot in each of two replications received 45, 61, 73, 102, 147, or 310 mL·m-2 of mist delivered intermittently by a traveling gantry (boom) system. Mist frequency was similar for all treatments and was related inversely to relative humidity (RH) within the polyethylene covered greenhouse. Rooting tubs in each plot were filled with a substrate of fine silica sand, and substrate water potential was held constant using soil tensiometers that activated a subirrigation system. Cutting water potential was measured destructively on two cuttings per plot beginning at 0500 hr every 3 hh until 2300 hr (seven measurements) 7, 14, 21, or 28 days after setting. During rooting, leaf temperature and RH were recorded in each plot to calculate vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Cutting water potential and VPD were strongly related to mist application. Cutting water potential was also related to VPD. Rooting percentage had a linear and quadratic relationship with mean cutting water potential and VPD averaged between 1000 and 1800 HR. Eighty percent rooting occurred within a range of values for VPD. Data suggest that VPD can be used to manage the water deficit of stem cuttings of loblolly pine to increase rooting percentage. These results may be applicable to other species and to other rooting environments.

Free access

Research by the authors has demonstrated the effect of day/night temperature difference (Tdiff) on plant growth is as substantive as the effect of daily average temperature (DAT). Dependence of plant primary productivity on temperature cannot be assessed with fewer than two data per 24 hours. Thus, the same experimental approach was applied to time to anthesis in Delphinium cultorum Voss `Magic Fountains' and Stokesia laevis L. `White Parasols', and to survival in D. cultorum. Two hundred and seventy seedlings of D. cultorum and 72 plantlets of S. laevis were grown for 56 days in growth chambers under eighteen 12 hour day/12 hour night combinations of six day and six night temperatures (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, or 35 °C). Ninety plants of D. cultorum were harvested after 13, 34, or 56 days, and 36 plants of S. laevis after 34 or 56 days. For each event of interest (anthesis or death), one datum per plant was recorded, consisting of time elapsed when either the event occurred, or the plant was harvested, whichever came first. Each datum was paired with an indicator of whether the plant was harvested prior to the event being observed. Data were analyzed using time—to—event data analysis procedures. Several parametric distributions fitted the data equally well, and both day and night temperature had strong effects on time to anthesis and survival time. However, in contrast with biomass production, DAT was quite sufficient to account for timing of these developmental events in relation to temperature. Addition of Tdiff contributed marginally to the fit to the data, but the magnitude of the effect was considerably smaller. Within the range of temperatures likely to be encountered in cultivation, the effect was negligible.

Free access

Root growth is a critical factor in landscape establishment of container-grown woody ornamental species. Kalmia latifolia (mountain laurel) often does not survive transplanting from containers into the landscape. The objective of this experiment was to compare rate of root growth of mountain laurel to that of Ilex crenata `Compacta' (`Compacta' holly) and Oxydendrum arboreum (sourwood). Six-month-old tissue-cultured liners (substrate intact) of mountain laurel, 1-year-old rooted cutting liners (substrate intact) of `Compacta' holly (liner holly), 6-inch bare root seedling liners of sourwood, and 3-month-old bare-root rooted cuttings of `Compacta' holly were potted in containers in Turface™. Prior to potting, roots of all plants were dyed with a solution of 0.5% (w/v) methylene blue. Plants were greenhouse-grown. Destructive harvests were conducted every 2 to 3 weeks (six total harvests). Length, area, and dry weight of roots produced since the start of the experiment, leaf area, and dry weight of shoots were measured. Sourwood and liner holly had greater rate of increase in root length and root dry weight than mountain laurel and bare root holly. Rate of increase in root area was greatest for sourwood, followed by (in decreasing order) liner holly, mountain laurel, and bare-root holly. Increase in root length and root area per increase in leaf area was highest for liner holly, possibly indicating why this species routinely establishes successfully in the landscape. Increase in root dry weight per increase in shoot dry weight was lowest for mountain laurel. The slow rate of root growth of mountain laurel (compared to sourwood and liner holly) may suggest why this species often does not survive transplanting.

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Experiments conducted in January (hardwood cuttings) and June (softwood cuttings) 1998 compared rooting and root dry weight (DW) of stem cuttings of three full-sib families of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) rooted in Jiffy forestry peat pellets and Ray Leach Super Cells. Ray Leach Super Cells (vol.= 162 cm3) served as the control and contained a medium of 2 peat: 3 perlite (v/v). Pellet sizes used were 25-65, 30-65, 36-65, 36-75, 42-65, 42-80, and 50-95 (dry diam.-expanded height in mm). Cuttings were taken from hedged stock plants and rooted for 12 weeks under mist in a humidity-controlled greenhouse. Following evaluation for rooting in the June experiment, ≈500 rooted cuttings in pellets and Ray Leach Super Cells were field-planted in eastern Georgia in December 1998 to study the effect of pellet size and cutting development on first-year field growth. Rooting percentages in January for hardwood cuttings rooted in pellet sizes 42-80 (36%) and 50-95 (57%) were less than the control (83%). Root DW for each pellet size was less than the control. Rooting percentage in June for softwood cuttings rooted in pellet size 36-65 (77%) was greater than the control (64%) whereas rooting percentages for cuttings rooted in pellet sizes 42-80 (50%) and 50-95 (52%) were less than the control. Root DWs for cuttings in pellet sizes 25-65, 30-65, 36-65, and 42-65 were less than the control. Field performance data will be presented.

Free access

Grafting fraser fir [Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] scions onto rootstocks of turkish fir (Abies bornmuelleriana Mattf.) is a strategy used by some Christmas tree growers in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina to reduce losses by phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands. This study compared the traditional time of grafting (April) with eight summer/early fall grafting dates from mid-July through mid-October. Shade and irrigation treatments were also superimposed on the grafting dates. To ensure optimal grafting success, grafting should be performed in the late winter/early spring (April) when scions are dormant and the rootstocks are becoming active. April graft success was 95% but when grafting fresh scions in summer/fall, graft success decreased from 52% in July to 0% in October. Shade improved summer graft success (52% with, 38% without). Irrigation did not significantly affect graft success or subsequent growth. In a supplemental storage study, grafting of stored scion material in summer/early fall was not successful (less than 1%).

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Abstract

Seeds of freshly harvested American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) were stratified at 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, or 25°C for 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16 weeks. Regardless of the duration of stratification, respiration was usually lowest at 5° and highest at 20°. For temperatures ≥15°, respiration increased with time, reaching a maximum at week 14 and decreasing thereafter. Measurable embryo growth was not detected at 5° and 10°, but at temperatures ≥15°, growth was observed beginning at week 10. By week 16, the greatest embryo growth was attained at 15°, while the greatest percentage of actively growing embryos occurred at 20°. Changes in embryo length closely paralleled those for the embryo: endosperm length ratio. Delaying the initiation of stratification after seed extraction by as little as 10 days reduced embryo growth.

Open Access

Rosebay rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum L.) seedlings were grown in controlled-environment chambers for 14 weeks under long (9-hour) days at 18, 22, 26, or 30C in factorial combination with 15-hour nights at 14, 18, 22, or 26C. Total dry-matter production was lowest for 18C days and highest for 26C days. A similar response occurred for top, leaf, root, and stem dry weights. Nights at 22C maximized total plant, top, leaf, and stem dry weights. The optimum day/night cycle for dry-matter production was 26/22C. Leaf area was optimum with 18C nights. Leaf weight ratio (leaf dry weight: total plant dry weight) increased with an increase in night temperature to a maximum at 22C. Root weight ratio (root dry weight: total plant dry weight) decreased with an increase in night temperature to a minimum at 22C. Stem weight ratio (stem dry weight: total plant dry weight) and shoot: root ratio (top dry weight: root dry weight) were not influenced significantly by day or night temperature. A day/night cycle of 26/22C seems to be optimal for producing-salable plants.

Free access

Seeds of `Dawn Carpet' and `Little Bright Eye' annual vinca [Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don] were subjected to 32 treatments, arranged as a four × four × two factorial. For each cultivar, seeds were exposed to one of four temperatures (15, 20, 25, or 30C) during the 8-hour (day) and 16-hour (night) portions of the cycle. Within each temperature regime, half the seeds of each cultivar were irradiated for 1 hour daily, and the other half remained in constant darkness. Final germination percentages were suppressed at 15C day or night temperatures; at temperatures ≥20C, there were no significant differences between treatments. Heat input (daily degree hours) was a controlling factor in germination; different temperature cycles with equivalent numbers of daily degree hours had similar effects on germination response. There was a strong interaction between temperature and irradiation regime for both cultivars. Irradiating seeds for 1 hour/day reduced final germination percentages under cool (15C) conditions; response was not adversely affected when seeds at 15C were germinated in darkness. In a second experiment, seeds at 25C were exposed to daily photoperiods of 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, or 24 hours. Germination percentages obtained in darkness and at photoperiods ≤12 hours were equivalent. Twenty-four-hour photoperiods suppressed germination compared to all other irradiation treatments.

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