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  • Author or Editor: Dewayne L. Ingram x
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Abstract

Electrolyte leakage was used to measure direct heat injury to roots of Illicium anisatum L., Ilex cornuta L. cv. Burfordii and Juniperus chinensis L. cv. Parsonii. A sigmoidal relationship was found between percent electrolyte leakage and temperature treatment. About 50% electrolyte leakage was realized from a 20 minute exposure of roots to 50.5 ± 0.5°, 48.5 ± 0.5° and 46.5 ± 0.5°C for I. anisatum, J. chinensis, and I. cornuta, respectively.

Open Access

Abstract

Root systems of Pittosporum tobira Thunb. plants were exposed to temperatures of 27°, 30°, or 40°C for 6 hours daily for 7 months. Top and root growth, root carbohydrate levels and photosynthetic rates were reduced by the 40° treatment. Content of K, Fe, and Zn in leaf tissues were reduced at highest root temperatures, while N content showed the opposite response.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Mrs. G.G. Gerbing’ azaleas (Rhododendron L.), grown 12 months in a 2 pine bark : 1 Canadian peat : 1 sand (by volume) medium in 3-liter containers and fertilized with Woodace 14N-1P-2K compressed fertilizer tablets, had greater shoot and root dry weights if the medium was not amended with dolomitic limestone, compared to plants grown in the medium amended with dolomitic limestone at 3 kg/m3. Shoot and root dry weights were not different for plants grown with or without a superphosphate (9% P) amendment at 3 kg/m3 in combination with or without the dolomitic limestone amendment. Growing-medium Mn levels were greater (0.5 ppm) without the dolomitic limestone amendment, than with the amendment (0.06 ppm), whereas P levels were similar with or without the dolomitic limestone amendment. On day 60, growing-medium P levels were greatest (10 ppm) for the superphosphate-amended medium without dolomitic limestone and decreased to 0.5 ppm on day 300. Tissue P levels were not different with or without the superphosphate amendment in combination with or without dolomitic limestone.

Open Access

Abstract

Fertilizer is the 2nd largest supply item purchased by commercial nurseries (1). The cost of fertilizer and labor for application has been estimated as 11% of production costs for a container nursery (2). Although fertilization (fertilizer and labor) costs are a small part of production costs, they are manageable. Thus, the ability to calculate fertilization cost accurately and rapidly assists the nursery operator in making timely management decisions. A microcomputer program was developed to calculate fertilization cost per container for one or combinations of the following methods of fertilizer application (MOA): broadcast, incorporation, injection, and top-dress.

Open Access

Leaf photosynthesis of Magnolia grandiflora `St. Mary' (13-month-old rooted cuttings) was studied when tree roots were exposed to 28, 35, or 42 ± 0.8C for 8 weeks. Root-zone temperature (RZT) treatments were sustained for 6 hours per day by an electronically controlled root-heating system. The experiment was conducted in a 3×7.5-m walk-in growth room. Growth room irradiance was supplied by eighteen 1000-W, phosphor-coated metal-arc HID lamps (photosynthetic photon flux = 600 μpmol-2·-1 at canopy height) for 13 hours daily augmented with 3 hours of incandescent light during the dark period. Leaf C assimilation (A) at an RZT of 42C decreased linearly over 8 weeks compared to leaf A at RZTs of 35 and 28C. Leaf A was similar for all trees at week 1; however, leaf A at an RZT of 42C was 30% and 34% less than at RZTs of 3.5 and 28C, respectively, at week 8. Stomatal conductance at RZTs of 28 and 35C increased linearly over 8 weeks compared to conductance at a RZT of 42C. Intercellular CO2 levels were not affected by RZT treatments. This finding suggests that reductions in leaf A were nonstomatal. Photosynthetic inhibition resulted in reduced shoot and root growth. Operators of outdoor container production nurseries should implement cultural practices that minimize exposure of tree roots to RZTs >35C.

Free access

Computer modeling was used to study the effect of container volume and shape on summer temperature patterns for black polyethylene nursery containers filled with a 4 pine bark: 1 sand (v/v) rooting medium and located in Phoenix, Ariz. (lat. 33.5°N, long. 112°W) or Lexington, Ky. (lat. 38.0°N, long. 84.4°W). For both locations, medium temperatures were highest at the east and west container walls, halfway down the container profile, regardless of container height (20 to 50 cm) or volume (10 to 70 liters). The daily maximum medium temperature (Tmax) at the center was lower and occurred later in the day as container volume was increased because of an increased distance to the container wall. For both locations, predicted temperature patterns in rooting medium adjacent to the container wall decreased as the wall tilt angle (TA) increased. Predicted temperature patterns at the center of the container profile were lowered in response to the interaction of increased container height and wall TA. As container height decreased, the container wall TA necessary to lower center Tmax to ≤ 40C increased; however, the required increase in TA was greater for Phoenix than for Lexington, principally because of higher ambient air temperatures.

Free access

The objective of this study was to examine the differences in global warming potential (GWP) and variable cost structure of a 5-cm-caliper red maple tree grown using two alternative production methods including a traditional field [balled and burlapped (BNB)] production system and a containerized, pot-in-pot (PIP) production system. Feedback from nursery growers was obtained to model each production system including the labor required for each cultural practice, materials used, and the hourly usage of tractors and other equipment. Findings from the study indicate that the total system GWP and variable cost for the PIP tree system is −671.42 kg of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) and $250.76, respectively, meaning that the tree sequesters much more carbon during its life than is emitted during its entire life cycle. The same holds true for the BNB tree; however, in this system, the GWP of the tree −666.15 kg CO2e during its life cycle at a total variable cost of $236.13. Thus, the BNB tree costs slightly less to produce than its PIP counterpart but the life cycle GWP is slightly less positive as well.

Free access

Ilex crenata Thunb. `Rotundifolia' split-root plants were grown for 3 weeks at root-zone temperatures of 30/30, 30/34, 30/38, 30/42, 34/34, 38/38 and 42/42. The 38 C root-zone temperature treatment was the upper threshold for a number of growth and physiological parameters. A portion of the root system grown at near optimum temperatures could compensate in terms of shoot growth for part of the root system exposed to supraoptimal root-zone temperatures up to the 38 C critical threshold. Higher root-zone temperatures did not affect photosynthetic rates or root:shoot ratios, but altered photosynthate partitioning to different stem and root sinks. Although no differences were found for total 14C partitioned to the roots, partitioning of the 14C into soluble and insoluble fractions and the magnitude of root respiration and exudation were influenced by treatment. Heating half of a root system at 38 C increased the amount of 14C respired from the heated side and increased the total CO2 respired from the non-heated (30 C) half. Exposure of both root halves to 42 C resulted in membrane damage which increased the leakage of 14C photosynthates into the medium.

Free access

Root growth of Magnolia grandiflora Hort. `St. Mary' was studied for 16 wk after an 8-wk exposure period to 30°, 34°, 38°, or 42°±0.8°C root-zone temperature (RZT) treatments applied 6 hr daily, Immediately after the RZT treatment period, total root length was similar for trees exposed to 30°, 34°, and 38°C and was reduced 45% at 42° compared to 38°C. For weeks eight and 18 of the post-treatment period, response of total root length to RZT was linear. Total root length of trees exposed to 28°C was 247% and 225% greater than those exposed to 42°C RZT at week eight and 16, respectively. Root dry weight from the 42°C RZT treatment was 29% and 48% less than 38° and 34°C RZT treatment, respectively, at week eight. By week 16, root dry weight as a function of RZT had changed such that the 42°C RZT was 43% and 47% less than 38° and 34°C RZT, respectively. Differences in root growth patterns between weeks eight and 16 suggest that trees were able to overcome the detrimental effects of the 38°C treatment whereas growth suppression by the 42°C treatment was still evident after 16 wk. Previous exposure of tree roots to supraoptimal RZT regimens may have long-term implications for suppressing growth and lengthening the establishment period of trees in the landscape,

Free access

Root growth of Magnolia grandiflora Hort. `St. Mary' was studied for 16 wk after an 8-wk exposure period to 30°, 34°, 38°, or 42°±0.8°C root-zone temperature (RZT) treatments applied 6 hr daily, Immediately after the RZT treatment period, total root length was similar for trees exposed to 30°, 34°, and 38°C and was reduced 45% at 42° compared to 38°C. For weeks eight and 18 of the post-treatment period, response of total root length to RZT was linear. Total root length of trees exposed to 28°C was 247% and 225% greater than those exposed to 42°C RZT at week eight and 16, respectively. Root dry weight from the 42°C RZT treatment was 29% and 48% less than 38° and 34°C RZT treatment, respectively, at week eight. By week 16, root dry weight as a function of RZT had changed such that the 42°C RZT was 43% and 47% less than 38° and 34°C RZT, respectively. Differences in root growth patterns between weeks eight and 16 suggest that trees were able to overcome the detrimental effects of the 38°C treatment whereas growth suppression by the 42°C treatment was still evident after 16 wk. Previous exposure of tree roots to supraoptimal RZT regimens may have long-term implications for suppressing growth and lengthening the establishment period of trees in the landscape,

Free access