Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 22 items for

  • Author or Editor: Deborah Buszard x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Shahrokh Khanlzadeh, Michel J. Lareau and Deborah Buszard

During 1987-90, nineteen strawberry cultivars and one selection from Agriculture Canada/McGill University were evaluated for their fruiting and other plant characteristics. Based upon an index of potential return which Integrates percent yield at each harvest date and total yield, the following cultivars listed in decreasing order of desirability (early productivity) are recommended: `Chambly', `Annapolis', `Honeoye', `Kent' and `Cavendish'. `Lina', `Lester', SJ83OR-2, `Bounty' and `Settler' have the most concentrated ripening period based upon an index of concentration. Highest yields were obtained with `Honeoye', SJ83OR-2, `Chambly', `Kent', Glooscap` and `Oka'. All had large, medium-firm fruit. Because of their tolerance to the herbicide terbacil and their large, medium-firm fruit, `Chambly', `Oka' and SJ830R-2 appear to be potential replacements for the commercial cultivars `Kent', `Honeoye' and `Glooscap' and are recommended for trials in Quebec. `Cornwallis', `Settler', `Midway', `Cavendish' and `Redcoat' had the lowest yield variability of the cultivars on trial.

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Mamdouh A. Fanous, Michel J. Lareau and Deborah Buszard

Three mathematical indices were developed to estimate: a) potential for early dollar return or early ripening (IE), b) concentrated cropping (IC), and deviation or similarity of a genotype to known cultivars (ID). Early ripening genotypes with high yield early in the season will have larger IE values than late genotypes with lower yield early in the season. Genotypes with few harvests will have larger IC values than those requiring several harvests. The ID index helps to identify and group genotypes with similar characteristics. These indices condense large numbers of values or arrays of traits into single index values, thereby simplifying genotype comparisons.

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Michel Lareau, Deborah Buszard and Domenico Bagnara

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Deborah Buszard, Odile Carrise and Pierre O. Thibodeau

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Deborah Buszard, Michel Lareau and Domenico Bagnara

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Jacinthe Fortin, Michel J. Lareau and Deborah J. Buszard

Frozen fruit of five locally grown strawberry cultivars and a recent introduction were compared to imported berries for making jam. Line scales were used to evaluate sensory attributes. Cultivars differed only in acidity, fruity flavor, and berry integrity. Jam produced with Quebec-grown berries was less acidic and more fruity tasting than that made from imported Mexican berries. `Kent' had better fruit integrity than Mexican berries, followed by `Chambly', `Midway', `Bounty', and `Glooscap'. Frozen local strawberries were preferred to Mexican berries for making jam. Overall impression was better for Quebec-grown strawberries with the exception of `Midway', which had lower overall impression than Mexican berries.

Free access

Brian P. Pellerin, Deborah Buszard, Alex Georgallas and Richard J. Nowakowski

Inhibition of flower initiation by nearby developing fruits is one of the main causes of biennial bearing in apple trees. This localized inhibition may depend on a critical ratio of inhibitor and promoter hormones that inhibits flowering of apical meristems. A model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. In the model, it is assumed that seeds and leaves act as point sources and export inhibiting and promoting hormones to apical meristems. The model assumes critical ratios of promoting and inhibiting hormones determine whether an apical meristem flowers or not and this may be a cause of biennial bearing. Thus, the spatial arrangement of shoot apical meristems on a limb is perhaps critical in determining whether meristems initiate flower clusters. This article presents a novel framework to view the hormone hypotheses of biennial bearing in apple trees and how management strategies such as flower removal could be used to achieve regular numbers of flower clusters over consecutive years.

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Bertrand Thériault, Odile Carisse and Deborah Buszard

Free access

Shahrokh Khanizadeh, Bertrand Thériault, Odile Carisse and Deborah Buszard

Free access

Shahrokh Khanlzadeh, Robert Pelletler, Michel J. Lareau and Deborah Buszard

Sixteen commercially grown strawberry cultivars with different degrees of resistance to red stele were evaluated for yield, plant characteristics and fruit quality. `Bounty', `Midway', and `Sparkle' had sufficient interior and exterior fruit color, good to satisfactory flavor and suitability for freezing. However, these cultivars as well as `Redcoat' lacked sufficient fruit firmness. `Bounty', `Redcoat', `Redchief and `Sparkle' had the highest yield in the three-year test. `Annapolis', `Earliglow' and `Scott' had reflexed calyx whereas `Allstar', `Annapolis', `Cornwallis', `Earllglow', `Guardian' and `Sunrise' were characterized by a raised neck suitable for mechanical dehulling. `Sunrise' appeared to be the only cultivar free of leaf scorch and leaf spot. `Tristar', `Redchief, `Lester', `Darrow' and `Arking' roots had the lowest incidence of red stele when planted in a naturally-infested field. No relationship between fruit characteristics was observed which suggests the necessity to examine each Individual tralt.