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  • Author or Editor: Carl E. Motsenbocker x
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Field experiments were conducted to assess how sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] clones interfere with weeds and how clones tolerate weed interference. Eleven clones with architecturally different canopies were evaluated for yield, canopy surface area and dry mass, weed dry mass, and light interception at ground level. A 2-fold difference in ground area covered by canopy surface area was observed among the eleven clones 42 days after planting, and a 3-fold difference in canopy dry mass at harvest. Yields were reduced from 14% to 68% by weed interference. The yields of high-yielding clones, `Beauregard', `Excel', L87-125, `Regal', `Centennial', and W-274, were reduced to a significantly greater extent by weeds than were yields of the other five clones. No differences were observed between clones for weed suppression as measured by weed dry mass at harvest and ground light interception. Short-internode and long-internode clones had similar competitive abilities. Yield of high-yielding clones was impacted more by weed interference than was that of low-yielding clones.

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Field studies were conducted in 1991 with `Jalapeno-M' and `TAM' Jalapeno pepper. Plants were established by direct seeding at 10, 20, 30, and 40 cm in-row plant spacing. Lodged plants, fruit quality and yield were monitored. A commercial snap-bean harvester was evaluated for harvest. Closer plant spacings resulted in greater yields and reduced plant lodging. No interaction of variety with plant spacing was observed. There were, however, differences in several yield parameters due to variety. Fruit quality characteristics of mechanically and hand harvested pepper stored at 6 C were similar. The use of the mechanical snap-bean harvester appears to be a feasible technique to harvest Jalapeno pepper.

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Field studies were conducted in 1992 with `GMississippi Sport' pepper. Plants were established by direct seeding at 8 cm or transplanting at 8, 15, 23 and 30 cm in-row plant spacing. All in-row plant spacings received one of five nitrogen applications (0, 55, 110, 165, 220 kg pe hectare). Plant parameters, fruit quality and yield were monitored. A modified commercial snap-bean harvester was evaluated for harvest. Closer plant spacings resulted in greater red and combined red and green grade yields. Nitrogen rate did not influence yield or stem diameter and height. The use of the modified mechanical snap-bean harvester appears to be a feasible technique to harvest sport pepper.

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