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  • Author or Editor: B. B. Rhodes x
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Abstract

‘Green Ice’ is a green-fleshed muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) adapted to the climatic conditions prevalent in the southeastern United States and is well-suited for both commercial and home garden production. It is a high-yielding ‘Honey Ball’-type muskmelon that produces round to oval, pale gray-green, medium-sized fruit that turn cream-colored and slip from the vine at maturity. The thick light-green flesh has a pleasing aroma and sweet flavor and is high in vitamin C. The vigorous plants are resistant to race 3 of powdery mildew [Spaerotheca fuliginea (Schlect ex Fr.) Poll.] and tolerant to most pests and environmental stresses of the region.

Open Access

Hybrid seed production can be facilitated by using male sterility coupled with a seedling marker. This research was initiated to combine the ms male sterility and dg delayed-green seedling marker into watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] lines. Male-sterile plants of the male-sterile line G17AB were crossed with plants of delayed-green breeding line Pale90, which has yellow cotyledons and pale-green, newly developed, true leaves. The double-recessive recombinants, male sterile and delayed green, from the F2 population were backcrossed to the male-fertile plants of G17AB. The pedigree method was used for selection in the progenies. The segregation ratios obtained from F2 and BC1F2 populations suggest that the male-sterile and delayed-green traits are inherited independently and that delayed green is inherited as a single recessive nuclear gene. Two male-sterile watermelon lines with delayed-green seedling marker have been developed. These lines will provide a convenient way to introduce male sterility and the delayed-green seedling marker into various genetic backgrounds. These two lines can be used for testing the efficiency of a new, hybrid, watermelon, seed production system.

Free access

This research was conducted to develop genic male-sterile lines of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Matsum & Nakai) homozygous for the juvenile albino (ja) seedling marker. Male-sterile plants (msms) of the genic male-sterile line G17AB were crossed with a Dixielee plant that was heterozygous for the ja locus. Male-fertile, juvenile albino recombinants of the F2 progeny were self-pollinated, resulting in F3 progeny. The male-sterile normal green recombinants of the F2 progeny were crossed with an F1 hybrid plant with genotype MsmsJaja, and three populations (93JMSB-1, -2, and -3) were obtained from these crosses. Juvenile albino recombinants were confined to 93JMSB-1. Of the juvenile albino plants of 93JMSB-1, male-sterile plants were sib-crossed with male-fertile plants, resulting in 93JMSB-1-1. Progeny of 93JMSB-1-1 was homozygous for ja and segregated for ms in a 127 male-sterile: 128 male-fertile ratio, fitting a 1:1 ratio. The male-sterile juvenile albino plants of F3 were crossed with male-fertile juvenile albino plants of 93JMSB-1, resulting in 93JMSF3-1 and -2. Plants 93JMSF3-1 and -2 were homozygous for ja but segregated for ms at 10 male-sterile: 13 male-fertile and 15 male-sterile: 19 male-fertile for 93JMSF3-1 and 93JMSF3-2, respectively, fitting the 1:1 ratio. These three genic male-sterile lines with the ja seedling marker provide valuable germplasm for introducing ms and ja genes into diverse genetic backgrounds and for studying cross-pollination and gene flow in watermelon populations.

Free access

Juvenile albino, gene symbol ja, is a spontaneous virescent mutant, first observed in `Dixielee' and an F2 population of `G17AB' (msms) × `Dixielee' in 1992. Hypocotyls, new young leaves, shoot tips, tendrils and flowers on the main shoot of the ja mutant are all albino during early spring. The interior portions of albino leaves gradually become green, while the margins remain albino. Fruit rind color of the mutant is variegated. Growth of the ja mutant is severely impaired in the early spring. However, the mutant grows at a rate comparable to wild-type in the summer, and produces fruit of almost normal size. Genetic analysis of F1, F2, and BC1 populations derived from the ja mutant showed that the gene for the ja mutant is inherited as a single, recessive, nuclear gene. Segregation ratios in the F2 and BC1 progenies derived from the cross between the previously reported delayed green virescent mutant and the ja mutant indicate independent inheritance of the genes dg and ja. Temperature and red/far-red light had no differential effect on mutant and the wild-type plants. An increase of daylength from 8 to 15 hours increased fresh weight and chlorophyll content more in the ja mutant than in the wild-type. The mutant had a higher chlorophyll a: b ratio than the wild-type under long days. Chlorophyll synthesis or accumulation in the mutant is severely impaired under short days. This is the only virescent mutant in the family Cucurbitaceae whose expression is regulated by daylength.

Free access

Abstract

Eleven maize inbreds homozygous for genes sugary (su) and sugary enhancer (se) were developed as a consequence of studies to characterize the effect of se with su on car bohydrates in the kernels (2, 3, 4). These inbreds should provide useful germplasm for the development of sweet com hybrids with superior culinary quality.

Open Access

Abstract

Five sugary enhancer (su se) inbreds were compared with 2 sugary (su Se) inbreds of maize (Zea mays L.) for postharvest changes in sugars and sorbitol. The level of sucrose, the predominant sugar, was 17 to 26% of dry weight for the su se inbreds, and 8 and 9% for the su Se inbreds at the time of harvest. The su se inbreds lost about the same proportion of their sucrose as the su Se inbreds during 48 hours storage at 30°C, but storage at 2° slowed or prevented the loss in both genotypes. The sucrose content of su se inbreds after 48 hours storage at 30° was still greater than that of freshly harvested su Se inbreds. For the other sugars and sorbitol, the effect of the se gene was minimal during storage. In general for both genotypes, fructose decreased and maltose increased during either storage condition. Sorbitol decreased during cool storage and increased during warm storage.

Open Access

Abstract

A new inbred, Illinois 677a, was found to have as high a sugar content as the sh2 genotype, and both had twice as much sugar as 3 commercial su1 cultivars when compared at the eating stage.

Open Access

Adventitious and axillary shoots of melon (Cucumis melo L.) were cultured from explants on a modified Murashige and Skoog medium containing 10 μm BA. Explants were diversified with regard to genetic source (breeding lines Miniloup, L-14, and B-line), seed parts (apical and cotyledon tissue), seed maturity (10-40 days after pollination; DAP), and cotyledon sections with respect to apical-radicle axis (distal and proximal). Plants were screened for ploidy level by pollen morphometry. Immature cotyledons produced more tetraploid regenerants than mature cotyledons from seed of breeding line Miniloup; the highest frequency of tetraploid regenerant plants was from cotyledons of embryos harvested 18 and 22 DAP. Explants from the apical meristem of the same seeds produced fewer or no tetraploid plants. Proximal sections from immature cotyledons of three genotypes (Miniloup, L-14, B-line) produced higher frequencies of tetraploids than whole mature cotyledons or whole immature cotyledons.

Free access

Isozyme, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers were used to generate a linkage map in an F2 and F3 watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thumb.) Matsum. & Nakai] population derived from a cross between the fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum) susceptible `New Hampshire Midget' and resistant PI 296341-FR. A 112.9 cM RAPD-based map consisting of 26 markers spanning two linkage groups was generated with F2 data. With F3 data, a 139 cM RAPD-based map consisting of 13 markers covering five linkage groups was constructed. Isozyme and SSR markers were unlinked. About 40% to 48% of the RAPD markers were significantly skewed from expected Mendelian segregation ratios in both generations. Bulked segregant analysis and single-factor analysis of variance were employed to identify RAPD markers linked to fusarium wilt caused by races 1 and 2 of F. oxysporum f. sp. niveum. Current linkage estimates between the resistance trait and the marker loci were too large for effective use in a marker-assisted selection program.

Free access

Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones that regulate plant height and flowering time in plants. Plants with reduced GA or disrupted in GA signaling exhibit a dwarf phenotype. DELLA proteins are transcriptional repressors that attenuate GA-mediated promotion of plant growth. Alleles in which the eponymous DELLA motif in these proteins is disrupted result in constitutive repression of GA signaling and a dominantly inherited dwarf phenotype. We found that the dwarf Helianthus annuus (sunflower) cultivar Sunspot is hyposensitive to GA3 as compared with the tall cultivar Mammoth Grey. Sequencing of the HaDella1 gene indicates that ‘Sunspot’ has a single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in a missense mutation in the DELLA motif as compared with ‘Mammoth Grey’ and the reference sequence. Helianthus annuus has five genes encoding DELLA proteins, including HaDella1. We propose that the DELLA motif alteration in the HaDella1 gene results in a dominant mutation in ‘Sunspot’ and is the cause of its dwarf phenotype.

Free access