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  • Author or Editor: A. M. Armitage x
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The effects of differing storage conditions prior to transplanting were examined for Salvia splendens `Red Hot Sally', Impatiens wallerana `Super Elfin White', Viola × wittrockiana `Universal Beaconsfield' and Petunia × hybrida `Supercascade Lilac'. Plug-grown seedlings were stored for 0, 1, 2 or 3 weeks at 5C or 10C and irradiance levels from incandescent bulbs at 0, 2 or 12 μmol s-1 m-2. A second group of plants were stored at 18C and irradiance from fluorescent bulbs at 105 μmol s-1 m-2 for the same time period. Temperature was more important than irradiance in maintaining plant quality over the storage period. Impatiens and salvia could be stored successfully for a minimum of 2 weeks at 5 or 10C with no appreciable loss of quality, petunia and pansy up to 3 weeks. Seedlings of all species showed diminished quality when stored longer than 1 week at 18C. After storage, petunias stored at 18C flowered sooner than those stored at 5 or 10C. However, these plants were single stemmed, with long internodes and few flowers while those plants stored at 5 or 10C developed multiple branching and a short, compact growth habit at flowering.

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Abstract

Plants of Salvia leucantha were subjected to 8, 10, 12, or 14 hr of light under controlled environmental conditions. Salvia leucantha is a short-day plant with a critical photoperiod of 12 hr for macrobud development, but 10 hr for subsequent flower development. About 14 photoperiodic cycles are necessary for flower initiation, but at least 42 cycles are required for normal anthesis and raceme elongation. Apices that had initiated under < 6 weeks of short days failed to develop when placed under long days. Flower initiation did not occur when night break lighting of 1.3 μmol·s−1·m−2 was provided by incandescent lamps.

Open Access

Abstract

Actively expanding apical meristems of geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum Bailey) growing in ambient light or in 60% shade were viewed with a scanning electron microscope at weekly intervals. Floral initiation was 37 days earlier in plants receiving ambient light and differentiation time was reduced by 7 days compared with shadegrown plants. Leaves of shade-grown plants emerged more slowly and were smaller when plants were young compared with ambient light-grown plants. Flowers of shadegrown plants were smaller and fewer in number compared with ambient-grown plants, both during differentiation and at anthesis. Shade-grown plants had 22–24 nodes at flower initiation compared with 16–18 nodes in ambient-grown plants.

Open Access

Abstract

Plants of Primula x polyanthus Hort. grown at 20°C night temperature had more flowers and leaves but shorter peduncles than at 10°. Area of individual leaves was smaller for plants grown at 20° compared with 10°, but total leaf surface area was the same for 10° or 20°. No difference was observed in dry weight or flowering time.

Open Access
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The University of Georgia trial garden has been in existence since 1982, and the method of evaluation and distribution of taxa has evolved over the years. Annual and perennial taxa are evaluated systematically, over the entire season, providing season-long summaries for each one. Annuals are evaluated every 2 weeks, and scores are based on plant performance, including foliar health, flower numbers and the appearance of disease and insect damage. Perennials are evaluated similarly, however flowering time, flowering persistence and height in the landscape are also noted. Summaries for each taxon are presented in tabular and graphic form. Many new crops have been evaluated and introduced to the floriculture industry. New crops are placed in the horticulture gardens and evaluated by garden personnel and by commercial growers and landscapers. Plants have been distributed free of charge to propagators and growers, resulting in rapid market acceptance of successful taxa.

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Abstract

Plants of Petunia hybrida ‘Coral Sea’ were placed in postproduction conditions of low (300 µE m−2s−1), medium (600 µE m−2s−1) or high (900 µE m−2s−1) quantum flux density (QFD) at temperatures of 10, 20, or 30°C after first flower opening. Change in dry weight and number of senesced flowers were determined, and visual quality ratings were given. Plants kept at 20° and 30° had greatest dry weight accumulation and flower number but poorest visual rating at 10 days when kept under high QFD, compared with those kept under medium or low QFD. When plants were kept at 10°, QFD was of little importance to postproduction quality. All plants delined in visual quality by 15 days when kept at 20 or 30° but remained satisfactory when kept at 10°. Plants should be held at either medium or low QFD when placed at 20° or 30° postproduction temperature.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Coral Sea’ petunia plants were irrigated at “low” frequency (surface media dry, soil moisture = −4 to −10 bars), “normal” frequency (surface media moist, soil moisture = −0.8 to −3 bars) or “high” frequency (surface media wet, soil moisture > −0.6 bars) during production. Postproduction quality was evaluated under cool (10°C day, 10° night), moderate (20° day, 20° night), or hot (30° day, 20° night) temperature postproduction environments. Frequency of irrigation was not significant when plants were placed in cool postproduction environments. In moderate or hot postproduction conditions, plants irrigated with high frequency declined in quality most rapidly. Low moisture-treated plants had slower flower development and senescence, greater dry weight, and better overall visual quality than plants with other moisture treatments.

Open Access

Plants of Salix alba `Britzensis' and Salix chaenomeloides were planted on 30, 60 or 90 cm centers in spring, 1992 and plants of Buddleia davidii `Black Knight' were planted at densities of approximately 45, 80, or 165 cm centers in fall, 1991. Stems of Buddleia were harvested in the summer and fall of 1992 and those of Salix were harvested in the winter of 1993. The number of stems/plant decreased but the number of stems/m2 increased with increasing plant density in all species. The stems of Salix alba `Britzensis' were significantly longer in the highest plant density.

Free access

Abstract

Nutrient solutions containing concentrations of 200, 300, 400, and 500 ppm N were applied to Rosa hybrida cv. Caliente grown under either 18 hours of high pressure sodium light of 110µEm-2s-1 quantum flux density or ambient light. Supplemental light increased yield and decreased foliar N and time to flower compared with ambient light. The lowest N level (200 ppm) produced the highest yield under ambient light, but 300 ppm N was optimum under supplemental light High N concentrations reduced stem grade under ambient light. Stem length, stem diameter, fresh weight, keeping quality, days to flower, and foliar nitrogen were not significantly affected by nitrogen treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

Diffusive resistance decreased and chlorophyll content increased in leaves of Impatiens hybrida (shade tolerant) subjected to 14 days of low quantum flux density (QFD) compared with high QFD. There was no difference in diffusive resistance or chlorophyll content in Pelargonium X hortorum Bailey (sun tolerant) regardless of QFD treatment. Light saturation of net photosynthesis (Pn) occurred at higher light levels in impatiens treated with low QFD compared with those treated with high QFD. Light saturation in geraniums treated with high QFD was the same as in those treated with low QFD. Stomatal density in impatiens was greater, and stomatal area was smaller than in geranium. Physiological processes of impatiens appear to be more sensitive to changes in QFD than those of geraniums.

Open Access