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Valtcho D. Jeliazkov (Zheljazkov)

Chemistry of Spices. V.A. Parthasarathy, B. Chempakam, and T.J. Zachariah. 2008. Oxford University Press, 198 Madison Avenue, New York. NY 10016. 400 pp. $190.00. Hardback, ISBN13: 9781845934057; ISBN10: 1845934059. Hardback, 400 pages Spices

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Lon Johnson

190 WORKSHOP 22 (Abstr. 1055-1058) Production and Utilization of Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Pacific Northwest and Caribbean

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Paul W. Bosland and Danise Coon

University has released three green to red jalapeño cultivars with unique characteristics, such as mildness, phytophthora blight disease resistance, or large fruit size ( Bosland, 2010a , 2010b ; Votava and Bosland, 1998 ). ‘NuMex Lemon Spice’, ‘NuMex

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Tamar Y. Harnik, Monica Mejia-Chang, James Lewis, and Matteo Garbelotto

2 Bayseng Spice Company, 21 Old Tunnel Road, Orinda, CA 94563. 1 E-mail matteo@nature.berkeley.edu . The critical comments on the manuscript by D. Rizzo and W. Schweigkofler were much appreciated. We also thank G. S. Biging for advice on

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Ildikó Hernádi, Zita Sasvári, Jana Albrechtová, Miroslav Vosátka, and Katalin Posta

paprika–spice pepper ( Capsicum annuum L. var. longum ), which is protected by the European Union as a national cultivar. It is traditionally cultivated in the Szeged and Kalocsa regions of Hungary ( Somogyi et al., 2000 ) and ≈28.6 t is annually

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J. Benton Storey

Tropical horticultural crops can be the spark that builds student interest in horticulture. They are a refreshing alternative to the temperate crops that most of our curricula are necessarily built around. Students who become familiar with production problems and opportunities between 30° north and south latitudes are better equipped to compete in the world economy. HORT 423 covers tropical ecology, soils, atmosphere, and many major crops. Beverage crops studied are cacao, coffee, and tea. Fruit and nut crops include bananas, mango, papaya, pineapple, dates, oil palm, coconut, macadamia, cashew, and Brazil nuts. Spices such as vanilla, black pepper, allspice, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, cassia, and cloves are studied. Subsistence crops such as cassava, yam, taro, pigeon peas, chick peas, vegetable soy beans, and black beans round out an exciting semester that draws students. HORT 423 is a 3-hour-per-week lecture demonstration course supplemented with slides from the tropical countries. Many students simultaneously enroll in a 1-hour HORT 400 course that is taught during the 1-week spring break in a tropical country. Recent trips have been two each to Costa Rica and Guatemala. These study trips are gaining in popularity. For more information about HORT 423 consult the world wide web at http://http.tamu.edu:8000/~c963/a/h423main.html.

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Denys J. Charles and James E. Simon

The curry plant [Helichrysum italicum (Roth) G. Don in Loudon ssp. italicum or H. angustifolium (Lam.) DC (Asteraceae)], a popular ornamental herb with a curry-like aroma, was chemically evaluated to identify the essential oil constituents responsible for its aroma. Leaves and flowers from greenhouse-grown plants were harvested at full bloom. Essential oils were extracted from the dried leaves via hydrodistillation and the chemical constituents analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry. The essential oil content was 0.67% (v/w). Sixteen compounds were identified in the oil and included: neryl acetate (51.4%), pinene (17.2%), eudesmol (6.9%), geranyl propionate (3.8%),β-eudesmol (1.8%), limonene (1.7%), and camphene (1.6%). While the aroma of the curry plant is similar to that of a mild curry powder, the volatile chemical profile of the curry plant does not resemble that reported for commercial curry mixtures.

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Michael S. Uchneat, Kathryn Spicer, and Richard Craig

The objective of this study was to identify geranium cultivars that exhibit differential reactions to floral inoculation with Botrytis cinerea Per. ex. Fr. Sixty-two genotypes, including both cultivars and breeding lines, were evaluated from several Pelargonium species. Resistant genotypes included the diploid Pelargonium peltatum (L.) L'Herit. cultivar King of Balcon and the diploid Pelargonium ×hortorum L.H. Bail. cultivar Ben Franklin, as well as the diploid Pelargonium peltatum accession 93-1-33 developed from an accession obtained from South Africa. Susceptible genotypes included the putative tetraploid Pelargonium peltatum cultivar Simone. Floral resistance was not correlated with foliar resistance. Diploid genotypes appeared to have greater resistance than tetraploid genotypes, and P. peltatum cultivars more resistance than P. ×hortorum cultivars. In addition, the association of petal number and resistance was investigated.

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Manuel C. Palada and Stafford M.A. Crossm

190 WORKSHOP 22 (Abstr. 1055-1058) Production and Utilization of Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Pacific Northwest and Caribbean

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Louis E. Petersen

190 WORKSHOP 22 (Abstr. 1055-1058) Production and Utilization of Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Pacific Northwest and Caribbean